Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

ANTH 358-01

Anthropology of Violence

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: Faced with the escalation of political and ethnic violence in the modern world, anthropologists have become increasingly aware of the need to address these realities which have forced a rethinking of the meaning of violence as a social and cultural phenomenon. This course interrogates the slippery concept of violence in the light of theoretical approaches from different disciplines. The course will begin with a discussion of how anthropologists have reexamined the concept of violence within the context of complex and large-scale societies. It will then address the preponderate weight that the concept of the state has played within the social sciences in interpretation of violence, followed by a consideration of how notions of community and cultural difference figure prominently in the ideology of conflict.

(4 credits)

ANTH 394-03

Global Generosity

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice Rahaim

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 394-02* From Italian Mafia dons to famous American philanthropists; from the knitting of “trauma teddies” in Helsinki to gift shopping in London; and from ceremonial exchange rings in Melanesia to the present day global refugee crisis: this course will investigate how generosity is understood and practiced in global perspective. We’ll begin the semester by examining key debates surrounding reciprocity, gifts, and exchange, theories of altruism and generosity, and patron-client relations. We’ll then explore the birth of the “humanitarian spirit,” and the complicated ethics and politics of humanitarian intervention. We will compare diverse religious traditions’ approaches to giving, including Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Jainism. And we’ll explore contemporary debates surrounding volunteerism within sectarian and neoliberal political regimes.

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

INTL 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with Political Science 352. (4 credits)

INTL 394-02

Global Generosity

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice Rahaim

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 394-03* From Italian Mafia dons to famous American philanthropists; from the knitting of “trauma teddies” in Helsinki to gift shopping in London; and from ceremonial exchange rings in Melanesia to the present day global refugee crisis: this course will investigate how generosity is understood and practiced in global perspective. We’ll begin the semester by examining key debates surrounding reciprocity, gifts, and exchange, theories of altruism and generosity, and patron-client relations. We’ll then explore the birth of the “humanitarian spirit,” and the complicated ethics and politics of humanitarian intervention. We will compare diverse religious traditions’ approaches to giving, including Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Jainism. And we’ll explore contemporary debates surrounding volunteerism within sectarian and neoliberal political regimes.

LATI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Political Science 245. (4 credits)

PHIL 223-01

Health and Human Rights

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Martin Gunderson

Notes: Human rights and healthcare are intimately connected. Human rights are used both to protect human subjects in biomedical research and to support claims for adequate healthcare. The use of human rights to protect human research subjects raises issues of informed consent, privacy, and individual autonomy. The use of human rights to secure healthcare resources raises issues about what level of healthcare ought to be supported and what constitutes a just distribution of healthcare resources. The course also explores recent work on the way in which human rights and public health combine in the quest to secure overall wellbeing. In general the course views public health through the framework of human rights. Alternate years. (4 Credits)


POLI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 245. (4 credits)


POLI 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with International Studies 352. (4 credits)

SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

Fall 2017

ANTH 246-01

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This writing-intensive seminar uses anthropology to situate the experiences of refugees and other forced migrants within a global framework of conflict and humanitarian response. Through analysis of select case studies, we will probe the complex interplay of social, historical, political, and economic factors that are invoked to explain modern refugee-producing conflicts. We will consider how refugees act and are acted upon in these settings and in their aftermath. We will examine critically the ways refugees are defined and described qualitatively and quantitatively, as such discourse determines access to certain entitlements and influences humanitarian and governmental responses. We will consider how refugees are defined in terms of time and space, yet simultaneously redefine time and space as transnational actors. Once we have a better understanding of the nature of the collective experience of war and its effects on refugees and others, we will consider issues of power, ethics, and human rights embedded in humanitarian responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work in U.S. and international settings. Our scope of inquiry includes humanitarian workers broadly conceived, including journalists, human services providers, government workers, researchers, faith-based organizations, and others. In addition to probing the ways that outsiders react to refugee concerns, we will also examine indigenous institutional coping mechanisms—such as family and religion—that facilitate social reconstruction in times of transition. The format of the course will be in-depth discussion, lectures, guest speakers, films, and a field research project that will involve cultural life history interviews with an individual engaged in humanitarian work. This course fulfills the Internationalism and Writing (Argumentative) general education requirements. It also counts a Foundational course for the Human Rights and Humanitarianism Concentration, as a Tier II course for the African Studies Concentration, and as an elective for the minor or major in Anthropology. The course may count as an elective for other Interdisciplinary departments.


ANTH 246-02

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)


ASIA 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 378

HIST 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 credits)

Cross-listed with Asian Studies 378

INTD 421-01

Human Rights and Humanitarianism Colloquium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: *2 credit course; S/SD/N grading only*

This course is designed to provide students with a culminating experience in the human rights and humanitarianism concentration. Through this experience, students will bring together past coursework, along with internship and/or study abroad experiences, reflect on their interests and future goals, and, for some, begin to prepare for further study and/or careers in the fields of human rights and humanitarianism. Class sessions will vary and will include student-led discussions and/or presentations, meeting with concentration faculty, and conversations and interactions with professionals, including Macalester alumni, working in human rights and humanitarianism. S/SD/N grading only. Junior or senior standing. Instructor permission required. (2 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

POLI 221-01

Global Governance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to global governance. It begins with a discussion of the concept of global governance. It then turns to some of the central features of contemporary global governance, including the changing status of the state and of international/world organizations and the role of global civil society. The emphasis here is on how patterns of global governance have changed and are changing and on the implications of these changes for democracy, social justice, etc. The remainder of the course focuses on the areas of international peace and security, human rights and international humanitarian law, and economic governance. By addressing such topics as the International Criminal Court and the role of the IMF and the World Bank in economic development, these parts of the course highlight the contested nature of global governance in each of the three issue areas. Political Science 120 recommended.(4 credits)

Spring 2018

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with Political Science 352. (4 credits)

LATI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Political Science 245. (4 credits)

PHIL 222-01

Philosophy of Human Rights

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Martin Gunderson

Notes: Although human rights play an obviously important international role, philosophers have found human rights puzzling and difficult to justify. What does it mean to say a person has a moral right or a human right? What is the relationship between human rights stated in international covenants and human rights that are said to be morally binding? Aside from questions about the nature of human rights, the course will consider possible justifications for human rights, both legal and moral, as well as arguments that ther are no human rights. The course will take up the issue of whether it is possible to adopt human rights while respecting the diversity of human cultures, religions, and moral views. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

POLI 207-01

US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: An examination of civil liberties and rights in the U.S., focusing on the cases decided by the Supreme Court. Central topics include the 1st Amendment freedom of religion, speech, and the press; the right to privacy and abortion; and the constitutional requirement of Equal Protection as affecting discrimination, affirmative action, and voting rights. (4 credits)

POLI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 245. (4 credits)


POLI 323-01

Humanitarianism in World Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: The past two decades appear to have been very successful ones for humanitarianism. Funding for humanitarianism has skyrocketed; humanitarian organizations have expanded their public support, as well as their activities; and, increasingly, humanitarian issues have found a place at the center of policy decisions. It is also generally agreed that humanitarianism is in crisis owing to the growing awareness of the sometimes harmful effects of aid; the expansion of the concept of humanitarianism to include human rights, development, and peace-building; and the increasing involvement of states in humanitarian operations. This advanced-level course explores the nature and dilemmas of contemporary humanitarianism. (4 credits)

POLI 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with International Studies 352. (4 credits)