Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 221-02

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

EDUC 460-01

Education and Social Change

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Ruthanne Kurth-Schai

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course explores the question: How can we educate to promote change toward more just, compassionate, and sustainable approaches to living and learning in a rapidly changing and increasingly complex world? We will consider contemporary barriers to and opportunities for systemic, progressive education reform and civic renewal on local, national and international levels. We will then work both individually and collectively, on campus and in the community, to analyze specific social issues and reform strategies in addition to conceptualizing plans for principled social action. (4 Credits)

ENVI 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth and how, in turn, this changing environment influences humans. The course will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Students will explore the fundamentals of environmental science, economics, cultural and political ecology, as well as a number of sectoral issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health. (4 credits)

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01;first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth and how, in turn, this changing environment influences humans. The course will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Students will explore the fundamentals of environmental science, economics, cultural and political ecology, as well as a number of sectoral issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health. (4 credits)

GEOG 249-01

Regional Geography of Latin America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 249-01*

This course explores one of the world's most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments fosters great cultural diversity, as well: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Through projects that explore different elements of Latin America's cultural geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region. (4 credits) Course cross-listed with Latin American Studies 249

INTL 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Charmaine Chua

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required; cross-listed with POLI 320*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with Political Science 320. (4 credits)

INTL 382-01

Poverty, Health, and Development

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course explores the links among poverty, health and socio-economic development in low-income countries. Key principles, methodologies and approaches to designing and evaluating programs to improve the health of poor populations will be discussed. We will explore several contemporary approaches to linked poverty reduction, public health improvement, and development. Enrollment limited to International Studies majors, Community and Global Health Concentrators, or International Development concentrators, or by permission of the instructor. 4 credits.

POLI 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Charmaine Chua

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required; cross-listed with INTL 320-01*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with International Studies 320. (4 credits)


SOCI 294-02

Neoliberalism, Poverty, and Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Rebecca Stepnitz

Notes: This course examines the growth of and changes in neoliberalism from the 20 th century to today. Who or what is a neoliberal? What is “neo” about neoliberalism? What changes has neoliberalism brought about and how have these changes affected how we approach questions concerning poverty and international development? Often, people examine neoliberalism as a form of governance—that is, as a means to allocate the power to make decisions and establishment of the criteria on which decisions are judged. From this perspective, neoliberalism rearranged relations between states and markets. In this course, we examine this perspective but also build on it to consider neoliberalism as a cultural and ideological phenomenon that affects the perception of problems and conception of solutions. We learn and apply sociological theories of state-market relationships to explore the changing role of economic markets. From this foundation, we will draw on insights from diverse perspectives (including history, cultural sociology, economic sociology, and critical geography) to address topics such as:

How ideas about individualism and progress influence the material world and peoples’ lived

experiences; How neoliberalism altered approaches to international development and poverty; and how neoliberal ideas and practices have altered who and what we consider to be the subjects and objects of policy.

Fall 2017

ANTH 363-01

Anthropology of Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: The goal of this course is to develop an anthropological understanding and critique of development. It aims to examine both the discourse of development and its practice. The course focuses on the construction of the Third World as an "underdeveloped" area, and discusses the dominant theoretical paradigms of development and modernization. It assesses the reasons for the general failure of development programs based on these models to bring about meaningful and substantive change in societies in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and discusses possible alternatives to "development" as it is currently practiced. (4 credits)


ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 221-02

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 426-01

International Economic Development

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *Capstone*

This course will apply the tools of economic analysis to gain an understanding of economic development problems and their solutions. Patterns of economic development in an historical and dynamic context will be examined. The central role of agriculture and the problem of technological change in agriculture will also be examined. Other topics will include neo-classical growth models, domestic and international economic policies, international trade, foreign aid, external debt, technology transfer, rural-urban migration and income distribution. (4 credits)

EDUC 460-01

Education and Social Change

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Ruthanne Kurth-Schai

Notes: *Permission of Educational Studies Department Chair required; first day attendance required; Educational Studies Majors only*

This course explores the question: How can we educate to promote change toward more just, compassionate, and sustainable approaches to living and learning in a rapidly changing and increasingly complex world? We will consider contemporary barriers to and opportunities for systemic, progressive education reform and civic renewal on local, national and international levels. We will then work both individually and collectively, on campus and in the community, to analyze specific social issues and reform strategies in addition to conceptualizing plans for principled social action. (4 Credits)

ENVI 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on agriculture. We will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Beyond agriculture, we will also examine other sectoral issues in relation to agriculture or as stand alone environmental concerns. These themes include: human population growth, consumption, biodiversity, climate change, and environmental health. We will be trying on a number of theoretical lenses from geography’s broad human-environment tradition (such as physical geography, cultural ecology, commodity chain analysis, political ecology, resource geography, the human dimensions of global change, hazards geography and environmental justice). In other words, I not only want us to explore a range of environmental issues, but also to grapple with theory and how this informs our understanding of the human-environment interface. (4 credits)

ENVI 368-01

Sustainable Development and Global Future

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Roopali Phadke

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

This course examines the history and modern use of "sustainable development" as a framework for international development. Close attention is given to the role of philanthropies, NGOs and social movements in shaping projects and policies. The course examines a range of topics including appropriate technology, microfinance, ecotourism and ecovillages. Prior coursework in international development and/or environmental studies is strongly recommended. Cross-listed with International Studies 368. (4 credits)

ENVI 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Geography 477 and International Studies 477. (4 credits)

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on agriculture. We will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Beyond agriculture, we will also examine other sectoral issues in relation to agriculture or as stand alone environmental concerns. These themes include: human population growth, consumption, biodiversity, climate change, and environmental health. We will be trying on a number of theoretical lenses from geography’s broad human-environment tradition (such as physical geography, cultural ecology, commodity chain analysis, political ecology, resource geography, the human dimensions of global change, hazards geography and environmental justice). In other words, I not only want us to explore a range of environmental issues, but also to grapple with theory and how this informs our understanding of the human-environment interface. (4 credits)

GEOG 249-01

Regional Geography of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with LATI 249-01; first day attendance required* This course explores one of the world’s most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments also fosters great cultural diversity: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Since this is a first-year course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in written and oral communication, scholarly research, and information literacy. Through research projects that explore different elements of Latin America’s geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region.

Class meets TR, 8:00 am - 9:30 am in Carnegie 05

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


INTL 368-01

Sustainable Development and Global Future

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Roopali Phadke

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of instructor*

This course examines the history and modern use of "sustainable development" as a framework for international development. Close attention is given to the role of philanthropies, NGOs and social movements in shaping projects and policies. The course examines a range of topics including appropriate technology, microfinance, ecotourism and ecovillages. Prior coursework in international development and/or environmental studies is strongly recommended. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 368. (4 credits)

POLI 221-01

Global Governance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to global governance. It begins with a discussion of the concept of global governance. It then turns to some of the central features of contemporary global governance, including the changing status of the state and of international/world organizations and the role of global civil society. The emphasis here is on how patterns of global governance have changed and are changing and on the implications of these changes for democracy, social justice, etc. The remainder of the course focuses on the areas of international peace and security, human rights and international humanitarian law, and economic governance. By addressing such topics as the International Criminal Court and the role of the IMF and the World Bank in economic development, these parts of the course highlight the contested nature of global governance in each of the three issue areas. Political Science 120 recommended.(4 credits)

POLI 242-01

Political Economy of Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: This course will help you answer questions about politics and economics in the developing world. For example: What explains global disparities in peace and prosperity? Is democracy good for the poor? Does foreign aid work? Our main objective is to use social science to describe and explain development outcomes. Although we will also address what can be done to solve problems such as poverty and civil war, this course will not provide any panaceas. If you finish the term unsatisfied and frustrated, you will have done something right! You will have begun to understand the complexity of development issues, which will equip you to contribute in a sophisticated way to ongoing scholarly and policy-oriented debates. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

EDUC 250-01

Building Trust: Education in Global Perspective

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sonia Mehta

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines the role of Education as global phenomena. The course encompasses a comparative view of education around the world, as well as its role in International Development. We take it further, by analysis and critique, to understand education as a force for change in an inter-dependent, globalized world. Specifically, we will examine ways in which policies and practice either enhance or diminish efforts towards change that is inclusive, just, sustainable and effective in relieveing suffering, while expanding potential and capacity in those affected by social change. We take the position that, in order to be effective, building trust becomes a key to connectivity between people, groups, organizations and ideas where education, development and change are theorized and practiced. We will construct possible education frameworks around the idea of building trust, by analyzing socio-cultural issues of power, voice, silence, and discourse. Fall semester. (4 credits)

EDUC 460-01

Education and Social Change

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ruthanne Kurth-Schai

Notes: *Permission of Department Chair required; for Majors only; first day attendance required*

This course explores the question: How can we educate to promote change toward more just, compassionate, and sustainable approaches to living and learning in a rapidly changing and increasingly complex world? We will consider contemporary barriers to and opportunities for systemic, progressive education reform and civic renewal on local, national and international levels. We will then work both individually and collectively, on campus and in the community, to analyze specific social issues and reform strategies in addition to conceptualizing plans for principled social action. (4 Credits)

ENVI 343-01

Imperial Nature: The United States and the Global Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

Although the United States accounts for just five percent of the world's population, it consumes roughly twenty-five percent of the world's total energy, has the world's largest economy, and is the world's largest consumer and generator of waste. Relative to its size, its policies and actions have had a significantly disproportionate impact on global economic development and environmental health. Mixing broad themes and detailed case studies, this course will focus on the complex historical relationship between American actions and changes to the global environment. Cross-listed with History 343. (4 credits)

GEOG 243-01

Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This class seeks to go beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent. As geographers, students will attempt to place contemporary African developments in a historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course takes a systematic rather than regional approach, examining sets of issues, rather than regions or countries of Africa. The course covers a broad range of topics, including: Africa in historical perspective; physical geography (physical landscapes, climate, vegetation, soils); human-environment interactions (forest degradation, desertification); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); social geography (African women and development, education); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); and political geography (democratization, conflict). (4 credits)

GEOG 363-01

Geography of Development and Underdevelopment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course introduces students to the geographic study of development around the world, with a particular emphasis on the Global South. The geographic approach emphasizes: the highly uneven nature of development; processes that link and differentiate various areas of the world; connections between development and the natural resource base; and the power relations inherent in development discourse. The course has three main sections: an introduction to development theory; an investigation of various development themes; and an intense exploration of what works and what doesn't in development practice. While much of the development literature has focused on failure, a specific aim of this course will be to uncover and interrogate success stories.

HIST 343-01

Imperial Nature: The United States and the Global Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 343-01 and ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

Although the United States accounts for just five percent of the world's population, it consumes roughly twenty-five percent of the world's total energy, has the world's largest economy, and is the world's largest consumer and generator of waste. Relative to its size, its policies and actions have had a significantly disproportionate impact on global economic development and environmental health. Mixing broad themes and detailed case studies, this course will focus on the complex historical relationship between American actions and changes to the global environment. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 343. (4 credits)

INTL 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 320-01*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with Political Science 320. (4 credits)

POLI 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 320-01*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with International Studies 320. (4 credits)