Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

AMST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with History 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

HIST 137-01

From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S. Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own.

HIST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with American Studies 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

INTL 114-01

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-02

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

PHIL 121-01

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 111
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

PHIL 321-01

Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 294-06*

This course will focus on some central topics in contemporary Anglo-American (or "analytic") social and political philosophy. Likely topics would include an examination of John Rawls's theory of justice and the work of critics of that theory, the value of equality, and issues about global justice. Every other year. (4 credits)

POLI 212-01

Rights and Wrongs: Litigation and Public Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: This course explores the significance, possibilities and limits of litigation as a way of shaping public policy and society. Focusing mainly in the American context, the course connects two braod areas of interest: the rise of rights movements in the 20th century (from the NAACP to contemporary movements such as gay rights) and the use of class action lawsuits and tort law to compensate people for injuries or risk, especially in matters affecting public health (e.g. asbestos, tobacco). Related subjects discussed include the historical roots of litigation as an approach to social problems and government regulation as an alternative to litigation. (4 credits)

POLI 294-06

Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: *Cross-listed with PHIL 321-01* This course will focus on some central topics in contemporary Anglo-American (or "analytic") social and political philosophy. Likely topics would include an examination of John Rawls's theory of justice and the work of critics of that theory, the value of equality, and issues about global justice.

RELI 394-02

Slaves, Animals, and Fetuses

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: William Hart

Notes: This courses addresses ethical “rhetoric.” We explore the construction of animals and fetuses as slaves. We focus on the use of the metaphors of enslavement and abolition by advocates of animal welfare, rights, and liberation and by opponents of abortion, associated reproductive technologies, and of the very notion of reproductive freedom. We explore the chain of associations that emerge between religion, slavery, race, humanity, and animality. The “religious unconscious” of this course revolves the fact that all humans as far as we know grapple with the relations among humanity, animality, and divinity. Thus the central thesis of this course is that the racialization of slavery occurred within Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions and that the historical enslavement of people of African descent provides the model for the ethical rhetoric of animal rights advocates and opponents of abortion. Among the questions we explore is the following: how does the appropriation by animal rights and anti-abortion activists of the image of the enslaved black person and the metaphors of slavery and abolition affect our understanding of racialization?

SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

Fall 2017

ENGL 310-01

Shakespeare Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Penelope Geng

Notes: In Shakespeare’s England, whipping, branding, mutilation (of the hand, nose, ears, or face), pillorying, hanging, burning, and beheading were common forms of legal punishment. The rigors of early modern law may seem strange or “barbaric” to us, yet we may recognize the intentions behind the laws: to restore order, to keep the peace, and to stabilize social relations. To grasp what justice meant to the early moderns and, in turn, what it means to us today, we will examine some of Shakespeare’s most challenging plays through the lens of legal and political philosophy. Plays such as Titus Andronicus, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, and Othello stage a spectrum of responses to insult, injury, and violence. At the same time, the texts trouble the division between good and evil, justice and revenge. Our agenda is two-fold: to deepen our reading of Shakespearean drama and to use our knowledge to investigate difficult and still unresolved questions about the problem of evil, the dialectic between law and justice, and the meaning of the “good life.”

PHIL 121-01

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

PHIL 121-02

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

POLI 206-01

US Constitutional Law and Thought

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: An exploration of the structure of the American political system as seen through the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics include the separation of powers in the federal government, the scope of executive power, and the development of federal-state relations over the course of American history. The material also includes the nature of judicial review, economic rights and contemporary questions about the limits of government power. Political Science 100 recommended. (4 credits)

POLI 316-01

Information Policy, Politics and Law

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required*

Over the past century the world has witnessed incredible changes in the ways that information is produced, distributed, and consumed. Through tutorials, seminar discussions, and individual projects, this course explores the policy problems and conflicts at the cutting edge of the global Information Society. Topics include secrecy, transparency, access to information, surveillance, privacy, intellectual property (such as copyrights and piracy), freedom of expression in a digital world, and the regulation of technology. Offered alternate years. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

AMST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with History 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

ENGL 310-01

Shakespeare Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Penelope Geng

Notes: Close study of half a dozen plays of Shakespeare, with special attention to his development of resources from performance arts and poetry into a powerful form that would come to engage the likes of Bertolt Brecht and other avant-garde theatre artists. Plays will be selected by critical interests and topics, for example gender and race in Shakespeare; masculinity in the Roman plays; the problem of character; Shakespeare and mythology; Shakespeare and later women writers; intercultural Shakespeare; the tragic and the comic. (4 credits)

HIST 137-01

From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S. Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own. 4 credits.

HIST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with American Studies 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

INTL 114-01

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-02

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

PHIL 121-01

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Samuel Asarnow

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

PHIL 121-02

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Samuel Asarnow

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

PHIL 224-01

Philosophy of Law

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: An analysis of fundamental legal concepts and the problems of justifying various legal practices. Topics may include the relationship between law and morality, the distinction between the criminal and civil law, theories of constitutional and statutory interpretation, and the appropriate role of the judiciary. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

POLI 207-01

US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: An examination of civil liberties and rights in the U.S., focusing on the cases decided by the Supreme Court. Central topics include the 1st Amendment freedom of religion, speech, and the press; the right to privacy and abortion; and the constitutional requirement of Equal Protection as affecting discrimination, affirmative action, and voting rights. (4 credits)