Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

MCST 110-01

Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: John Kim

Notes: This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. Designed as preparation for intermediate and advanced work grounded in cultural studies, the course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Completion of or enrollment in MCST 110 is the prerequisite for majoring in media and cultural studies. (4 credits)

MCST 110-02

Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: John Kim

Notes: This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. Designed as preparation for intermediate and advanced work grounded in cultural studies, the course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Completion of or enrollment in MCST 110 is the prerequisite for majoring in media and cultural studies. (4 credits)

MCST 126-01

Local News Media Institutions

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Michael Griffin

Notes: In this course students analyze the social, cultural, economic, political, and regulatory factors shaping the nature of US communications media, and then investigate how this affects local media organizations and their role in recognizing, serving and facilitating (or not) local populations, communities, interaction, identity, and civic engagement. Considering the history and practices of American journalism, and the current shifts in media technology and economics, the class examines the degree to which media function to provide effective access to news and information, foster diversity of content, encourage civic engagement, and serve the interest of citizens and diverse communities in a democratic society. Individual student projects for the course begin by identifying particular geographic, ethnic, or cultural neighborhoods and communities in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, and proceed to explore the degree to which these communities are recognized, defined, or served by various media institutions and journalism practice. Students explore various attempts to revitalize local communication, news delivery and civic discourse through experiments in community media, citizen journalism, community-based news aggregation, media arts, community service and other media innovations and reforms across neighborhood, ethnic, immigrant, gender, sexuality, and other public issues and community participation. No prerequisites. (4 credits)

MCST 128-01

Film Analysis/Visual Culture

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Michael Griffin

Notes: This course introduces the aesthetics of film as well as selected issues in contemporary film studies. Its aesthetic approach isolates the features that constitute film as a distinct art form: narrative or non-narrative structure, staging, cinematography, editing, and sound. Topics in contemporary film studies that might be considered include one or more of the following: cultural studies and film, industrial organization and globalization, representations of gender and race, and theories of authorship, horror, and spectatorship. Several papers, a test covering basic film terms, and a short video project emphasizing abstract form are required. Suitable for first year students. (4 credits)

MCST 194-01

Movies of the Third Reich

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Linda Schulte-Sasse

Notes: *Cross-listed with GERM 194-01* Although Donald Trump is, despite the many comparisons, a far cry from Hitler, examining how Nazism sold itself may help us understand the reasons for Trump’s victory, as populist/völkisch movements share common themes across time. The Nazis were masters of propaganda, brilliant at mobilizing the modern media to disseminate their (ironically often anti-modern) world view. Even before seizing power, they recognized the power of film in sustaining their imaginary, and created a film industry that rivaled (and resembled) Hollywood. What did Nazi movies look like? How did they balance film propaganda with film entertainment? Was resistance possible in this system? Instead of asking “What is a fascist film,” we’ll explore how film functioned under fascism. Taught in English; no prerequisites.

Student obligations: attendance, journal responding to readings and films, oral sequence analysis, midterm and final exams, one longer paper.

MCST 234-01

New Media Theories/Practices

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: John Kim

Notes: In the last couple of decades we have seen the invention and popularization of a wide assortment of digital technologies and with them, a wide variety of new media forms. The internet (which includes a collection of media forms, from web pages and peer-to-peer software to social media and video sharing sites), massively multiplayer online video games, ubiquitous computing, software, mobile phones - together, many argue, these and other forms of new media are reshaping how we live, create, work and even, what it means to be human. In this class we'll examine a cross-section of contemporary humanistic research that has sought to understand the impact(s) of new media through a comparison to earlier, pre-digital media. In addition, we will engage in hands-on workshops, where we will use and learn some of the tools, software, and websites that our texts consider. (4 credits)

MCST 252-01

Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with ANTH 252-01 and INTL 252-01*

This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century. In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.” This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations. One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally. (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 credits)

MCST 321-01

Cultures of Neoliberalism

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Bradley Stiffler

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 321-01*

Neoliberal theory posits the relative autonomy of the economic sphere from both culture and politics. Rejecting this assumption, the course will give students the ability to understand the interconnection of economic, political and cultural practices as well as the ways that economic theories are shaped by cultural assumptions about what constitutes a person, a life, a society, etc. We will read some of the foundational texts from the neoliberal school of economic thought (Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman) alongside more contemporary reflections on the culture and politics of neoliberalism from the fields of Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, and Critical Race Studies. Additionally, we will look at both the global institutions that craft and enforce economic policies as well as their impacts in multiple international contexts. This course will emphasize interdisciplinarity and original research. Finally, in addition to key texts, we will examine recent documentaries that attempt to render economic structures visible. (4 credits)

MCST 342-01

Representing the World As It Is: Histories/Theories of Ethnographic Film

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with ANTH 342-01 and INTL 342-01*

How can an experience of the world as it is be represented? What are the promises and challenges of transcultural filmmaking? This course will explore what has been called ethnographic, cross-cultural and transcultural cinema from several points of view. We will look at ethnographic film in terms of its geo-political, anthropological and cinematic origins, and then delve into its various forms and contemporary manifestations. We will examine some of the major films of the canon of ethnographic cinema, and look at the developments of several it its most renowned practitioners (Flaherty, Mead, Rouch, Marshall, Gardner, Asch, MacDougall). We will explore the shifting forms and representational strategies of ethnographic film and how these are linked to technological and ideological transformations. We will see how scholars inside and outside of anthropology have defined, criticized or challenged the project of ethnographic film, and how recent film and video makers, including those who traditionally have been the subject of the ethnographic gaze, have created new ways of visualizing experience for themselves and for others. (4 credits)

MCST 354-01

Blackness in the Media

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 354-01*

This course examines mainstream and alternative systems of African American representation in the media from the 1820s to the 1960s, including race records, race movies, the Black press, Black video, and Black appeal radio. It also examines the way Blackness is constructed in the media today, including the role of new media (such as cable and the Internet); new corporate formations (such as FOX, UPN, and BET), and new forms of representation (such as representations that reject the Black-White binary). (4 credits) Cross-listed with American Studies 354.


MCST 394-01

Finding Success on the Film Festival Circuit

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Andrew Peterson

Notes: Students will develop, write, produce and direct a short film of their choosing during this course--by first learning storytelling techniques that are effective in today's film festival marketplace, and tips on how to avoid the pitfalls that too often prevent a good idea from realizing its full potential, taught by an accomplished writer/director/producer with over 13 years of festival programming experience.

Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Video Production or by permission. Students must be proficient with basic camera, lighting, and sound equipment and have experience editing with Adobe Premiere software.


MCST 488-01

Advanced Seminar: Capstone on Afrofuturism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: This capstone course will focus on dystopian and utopian media representations, in addition to the basic foundations, which cover science fiction/speculative fiction and documentary representations.

Fall 2017

MCST 110-01

Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 111
  • Instructor: John Kim

Notes: This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. Designed as preparation for intermediate and advanced work grounded in cultural studies, the course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Completion of or enrollment in MCST 110 is the prerequisite for majoring in media and cultural studies. (4 credits)

MCST 114-01

News Reporting and Writing

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Howard Sinker

Notes: This class gives an introduction to the many media platforms that are vital to contemporary journalism, and provides a strong foundation in news writing and reporting. It is taught by a veteran editor and writer, who is a Macalester graduate and currently a digital editor at the Minneapolis Star Tribune (startribune.com). Campus and Twin Cities communities are used as students plan, develop, report and write stories individually and in groups. Cookies are usually served in class. (4 credits)

MCST 128-01

Film Analysis/Visual Culture

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Michael Griffin

Notes: This course introduces the aesthetics of film as well as selected issues in contemporary film studies. Its aesthetic approach isolates the features that constitute film as a distinct art form: narrative or non-narrative structure, staging, cinematography, editing, and sound. Topics in contemporary film studies that might be considered include one or more of the following: cultural studies and film, industrial organization and globalization, representations of gender and race, and theories of authorship, horror, and spectatorship. Several papers, a test covering basic film terms, and a short video project emphasizing abstract form are required. Suitable for first year students. (4 credits)

MCST 194-01

Mass Incarceration and the Media

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *First Year Course only* The "Chain Gang" was one of the first tools of the prison-industrial complex in the United States, especially in the South, dating back to Reconstruction. It was designed to re-enslave Black men who were freed from forced labor by the 13th Amendment. Chain gangs were deployed as work crews by corporations such as U.S. Steele. Chain gangs and other parts of the system of mass incarceration have been visible in Hollywood movies and in other parts of popular culture since the era of the Big Studios in the 1930s. An example is Paul Muni's 1933 film, I was a Fugitive from A Chain Gang, which is a narrative about a wrongly convicted working class White man who was swept up into prison industrial complex. But the early films represented mass incarceration as a system dominated by White inmates, whereas recent work by scholars represent the system as disproportionately African American. In this class, we will read the work of historian Michelle Alexander (The New Jim Crow), journalist Douglas Blackmon (Slavery by Another Name) and others who argue that mass incarceration has always been disproportionately Black, and we will study the ways that mass culture has begun to reflect this reality. We will begin the course by examining Paul Muni's film and then we will move on to more recent representations (COPS, Lockup, Orange is the New Black, Oz, and 13th).

The course requires a research paper and a paper for public consumption written for Criminal Injustice, a blog managed by Prof. Nancy Heitzeg at the University of St. Catherine's in St. Paul.

Class meets TR, 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm in Neill Hall 402

Writing designation:

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


MCST 202-01

Global Media Industries

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Michael Griffin

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*

Global media collectively have tremendous influence in how many see and comprehend the world and therefore on the information and beliefs upon which they feel or act. While media are central to the continued production of a sense of "the world" at large or the "global" scale, media industries are situated geographically, culturally and institutionally. Even if they promise worldwide coverage or are multinational companies, there is much to be gained from studying how media are produced and distributed differently according to specific social, political, economic and historical conditions. This course considers media industries around the world with a focus on the relationships between the labor and infrastructures behind representations in a broad range of media (television, radio, cinema, news, telecommunications, internet). (4 credits) Cross-listed with International Studies 202.

MCST 234-01

New Media Theories/Practices

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: John Kim

Notes: In the last couple of decades we have seen the invention and popularization of a wide assortment of digital technologies and with them, a wide variety of new media forms. The internet (which includes a collection of media forms, from web pages and peer-to-peer software to social media and video sharing sites), massively multiplayer online video games, ubiquitous computing, software, mobile phones - together, many argue, these and other forms of new media are reshaping how we live, create, work and even, what it means to be human. In this class we'll examine a cross-section of contemporary humanistic research that has sought to understand the impact(s) of new media through a comparison to earlier, pre-digital media. In addition, we will engage in hands-on workshops, where we will use and learn some of the tools, software, and websites that our texts consider. (4 credits)

MCST 279-01

Value: The Bad, the Ugly, and the Cheap

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Kiarina Kordela

Notes: *Cross-listed with GERM 279-01; taught in English*

For thousands of years value has been scrutinized in philosophy, art history, and economic analysis, as it cuts across three constitutive aspects of social, cultural, and political life: economy, aesthetics, and ethics. Not only do we have and impose on the world our moral, aesthetic, and exchange values, but these three fields often become difficult to distinguish, as is evident in the slippery flexibility of words that allow us to say as much “this painting is bad or worthless” as “I think this person is bad or worthless,” or “this is a bad, or worthless, remark” and “this is a bad or worthless check.” This course will focus primarily on influential accounts of value in aesthetic theory, while also examining the ways in which aesthetic value demarcates itself from or implicates its moral and economic counterparts, and what the interplays among the three fields entail for aesthetic value. Our readings will focus on the impact of primarily German thought on the formation of modern aesthetic theory—from the early eighteenth century through the Enlightenment and Romanticism to high modernism and the Frankfurt School.

Class and readings in English. No pre-knowledge required. This course is appropriate for all level students. (4 credits)

MCST 323-01

Fundamentals of Video Production

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Morgan Adamson

Notes: This course is designed as a basic introduction to digital video production. The objective of the class is to familiarize students of film theory and history with the language of cinema from the standpoint of production in order to deepen your appreciation and knowledge of the technical aspects of film/video and to develop your capacity to use video as a tool for research and communication. In this way, the course will be a combination of technical instruction, critical engagement, and creative exploration. We will analyze and employ a variety of filmmaking techniques as well as constructing narrative and non-narrative strategies for doing so. The focus of the course will be to familiarize you with some basic conventions of experimental, documentary, and narrative cinema. In each assignment, you will be encouraged to think about how formal decisions enhance and further narrative or thematic elements. We will thus pay very close attention to formal aspects of cinematic production: mise-en-scene. cinematography, editing, and sound design. In addition to this attention to form, success in the class will be dependent on a commitment to working through the technical aspects of video production (camera operation, lighting, editing software) in order to create short, original video pieces. Every year. (4 credits)

MCST 334-01

Cultural Studies and the Media

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 334-01*

An overview of contemporary approaches to media as culture, a determining as well as determined sphere in which people make sense of the world, particularly in terms of ethnicity, gender, identity, and social inequality. Students develop tools for analyzing media texts and accounts of audience responses derived from the international field of cultural studies and from the social theory on which it draws. Analysis emphasizes specificity of media texts, including advertisements, films, news reports, and television shows. Experience in cooperative discussion, research, and publication. (4 credits) Cross-listed with American Studies 334.

MCST 488-01

Gender, Labor, and the Media

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Morgan Adamson

Notes: In the capstone seminar, students working on an independent project in line with the theme of the seminar share their scholarship, integrating what they have learned in the major, emphasizing knowledge gained in their focus area, as well as presenting their work at a concluding mini-conference. The capstone experience involves close analysis of cultural artifacts that examine at a higher level issues first raised in the introductory course. The department plans to offer two seminars every year, at least one in media studies, enabling students to select the seminar most relevant to their intellectual development. In exceptional cases, students with sufficient preparation may take the seminar prior to their senior year. Students may take more than one HMCS senior seminar as long as content varies. Recommended prerequisite for film studies seminars: MCST 128. Non-majors are welcome if they have taken MCST 110 or a comparable course. Recent seminar topics have included: Image/Text: Metaphor, Myth and Power; Advanced Film Analysis; Advanced Studies in War and Media; Postmodernism, Identity and the Media; Whiteness and the Media; Advanced Queer Media. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

MCST 110-01

Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. Designed as preparation for intermediate and advanced work grounded in cultural studies, the course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Completion of or enrollment in MCST 110 is the prerequisite for majoring in media and cultural studies. (4 credits)

MCST 110-02

Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. Designed as preparation for intermediate and advanced work grounded in cultural studies, the course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Completion of or enrollment in MCST 110 is the prerequisite for majoring in media and cultural studies. (4 credits)

MCST 126-01

Local News Media Institutions

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Michael Griffin

Notes: In this course students analyze the social, cultural, economic, political, and regulatory factors shaping the nature of US communications media, and then investigate how this affects local media organizations and their role in recognizing, serving and facilitating (or not) local populations, communities, interaction, identity, and civic engagement. Considering the history and practices of American journalism, and the current shifts in media technology and economics, the class examines the degree to which media function to provide effective access to news and information, foster diversity of content, encourage civic engagement, and serve the interest of citizens and diverse communities in a democratic society. Individual student projects for the course begin by identifying particular geographic, ethnic, or cultural neighborhoods and communities in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, and proceed to explore the degree to which these communities are recognized, defined, or served by various media institutions and journalism practice. Students explore various attempts to revitalize local communication, news delivery and civic discourse through experiments in community media, citizen journalism, community-based news aggregation, media arts, community service and other media innovations and reforms across neighborhood, ethnic, immigrant, gender, sexuality, and other public issues and community participation. No prerequisites. (4 credits)

MCST 128-01

Film Analysis/Visual Culture

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Morgan Adamson

Notes: This course introduces the aesthetics of film as well as selected issues in contemporary film studies. Its aesthetic approach isolates the features that constitute film as a distinct art form: narrative or non-narrative structure, staging, cinematography, editing, and sound. Topics in contemporary film studies that might be considered include one or more of the following: cultural studies and film, industrial organization and globalization, representations of gender and race, and theories of authorship, horror, and spectatorship. Several papers, a test covering basic film terms, and a short video project emphasizing abstract form are required. Suitable for first year students. (4 credits)

MCST 252-01

Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 252-01 and INTL 252-01*

This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century. In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.” This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations. One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally. (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 credits)

MCST 321-01

Cultures of Neoliberalism

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Morgan Adamson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 321-01*

Neoliberal theory posits the relative autonomy of the economic sphere from both culture and politics. Rejecting this assumption, the course will give students the ability to understand the interconnection of economic, political and cultural practices as well as the ways that economic theories are shaped by cultural assumptions about what constitutes a person, a life, a society, etc. We will read some of the foundational texts from the neoliberal school of economic thought (Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman) alongside more contemporary reflections on the culture and politics of neoliberalism from the fields of Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, and Critical Race Studies. Additionally, we will look at both the global institutions that craft and enforce economic policies as well as their impacts in multiple international contexts. This course will emphasize interdisciplinarity and original research. Finally, in addition to key texts, we will examine recent documentaries that attempt to render economic structures visible. (4 credits)

MCST 323-01

Fundamentals of Video Production

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Morgan Adamson

Notes: This course is designed as a basic introduction to digital video production. The objective of the class is to familiarize students of film theory and history with the language of cinema from the standpoint of production in order to deepen your appreciation and knowledge of the technical aspects of film/video and to develop your capacity to use video as a tool for research and communication. In this way, the course will be a combination of technical instruction, critical engagement, and creative exploration. We will analyze and employ a variety of filmmaking techniques as well as constructing narrative and non-narrative strategies for doing so. The focus of the course will be to familiarize you with some basic conventions of experimental, documentary, and narrative cinema. In each assignment, you will be encouraged to think about how formal decisions enhance and further narrative or thematic elements. We will thus pay very close attention to formal aspects of cinematic production: mise-en-scene. cinematography, editing, and sound design. In addition to this attention to form, success in the class will be dependent on a commitment to working through the technical aspects of video production (camera operation, lighting, editing software) in order to create short, original video pieces. Every year. (4 credits)

MCST 354-01

Blackness in the Media

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 354-01*

This course examines mainstream and alternative systems of African American representation in the media from the 1820s to the 1960s, including race records, race movies, the Black press, Black video, and Black appeal radio. It also examines the way Blackness is constructed in the media today, including the role of new media (such as cable and the Internet); new corporate formations (such as FOX, UPN, and BET), and new forms of representation (such as representations that reject the Black-White binary). (4 credits) Cross-listed with American Studies 354.


MCST 357-01

Adv Journalism: New Media

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Mary Turck

Notes: In-depth reporting and writing of news, feature and opinion pieces. This course stresses effective writing and editing and the development of a strong sense of journalistic ethics. Emphasis is placed on reporting throughout the community and frequent discussions with practicing journalists, writers and policy makers. Students will examine the changing role and formats of media and the impact of media and journalists on culture, politics, government, education, the legal system and the community. Taught by a veteran print and online journalist and editor. (4 credits)

MCST 488-01

Adv Seminar:Capstone New Media

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: John Kim

Notes:

Notes: In the capstone seminar, students working on an independent project in line with the theme of the seminar share their scholarship, integrating what they have learned in the major, emphasizing knowledge gained in their focus area, as well as presenting their work at a concluding mini-conference. The capstone experience involves close analysis of cultural artifacts that examine at a higher level issues first raised in the introductory course. The department plans to offer two seminars every year, enabling students to select the seminar most relevant to their intellectual development. In exceptional cases, students with sufficient preparation may take the seminar prior to their senior year. Students may take more than one MCS senior seminar as long as content varies. Non-majors are welcome if they have taken MCST 110 or a comparable course. Recent seminar topics have included: Image/Text: Metaphor, Myth and Power; Advanced Film Analysis; Advanced Studies in War and Media; Postmodernism, Identity and the Media; Whiteness and the Media; Advanced Queer Media.