Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

PSYC 100-01

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Anjali Dutt

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-02

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Anjali Dutt

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L1

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L2

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L3

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L4

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 180-01

Brain, Mind, and Behavior

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 113
  • Instructor: Eric Wiertelak

Notes: *Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*

A multidisciplinary investigation of behavior and the nervous system. Particular emphasis is placed on human processes of perception, cognition, learning, memory, and language. This course also serves as the introductory course for the neuroscience studies major. (4 credits)

PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L1

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L2

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 220-01

Educational Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Tina Kruse

Notes: *Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*

An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings. (4 credits)

PSYC 240-01

Principles of Learning and Behavior

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Julia Manor

Notes: *Cross-listed with NEUR 240-01*

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the principles and methods used in the study of how behavior changes as a function of experience. The emphasis will be on classical and operant conditioning principles and procedures, which have become the standard research technologies used in biomedical, psychopharmacological, and other animal laboratory research areas. The laboratory component is designed to give students experience with behavioral technology and data collection and analysis. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 240-L1

Principles of Learning and Behavior

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 371
  • Instructor: Julia Manor

Notes: *Cross-listed with NEUR 240-L1*

This course provides an in-depth introduction to the principles and methods used in the study of how behavior changes as a function of experience. The emphasis will be on classical and operant conditioning principles and procedures, which have become the standard research technologies used in biomedical, psychopharmacological, and other animal laboratory research areas. The laboratory component is designed to give students experience with behavioral technology and data collection and analysis. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 242-01

Cognitive Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 242-L1

Cognitive Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 244-01

Cognitive Neuroscience

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Cross-listed with NEUR 244-01; ACTC students may register with permission of the instructor*

Cognitive neuroscience is a relatively recent discipline that combines cognitive science and cognitive psychology with biology and neuroscience to investigate how the brain enables the myriad of complex functions we know as the mind. This course will explore basic concepts and contemporary topics in the field, focusing in particular on the methods used in cognitive neuroscience research. Through lecture and lab sessions, students will learn to read and interpret primary source material, design and implement cognitive neuroscience studies, and present research in verbal and written forms. Overall, students will gain an appreciation for the amazing intricacy of the brain-mind relationship, as well as a sense of how this relationship may be understood eventually using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Group A course. (4 credits)

PSYC 244-L1

Cognitive Neuroscience Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Cross-listed with NEUR 244-L1; ACTC students may register with permission of the instructor*

Cognitive neuroscience is a relatively recent discipline that combines cognitive science and cognitive psychology with biology and neuroscience to investigate how the brain enables the myriad of complex functions we know as the mind. This course will explore basic concepts and contemporary topics in the field, focusing in particular on the methods used in cognitive neuroscience research. Through lecture and lab sessions, students will learn to read and interpret primary source material, design and implement cognitive neuroscience studies, and present research in verbal and written forms. Overall, students will gain an appreciation for the amazing intricacy of the brain-mind relationship, as well as a sense of how this relationship may be understood eventually using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Group A course. (4 credits)

PSYC 250-01

Developmental Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Cari Gillen-O'Neel

Notes: This is a course in lifespan human development; as such, we examine psychological theories and research to describe, understand, and explain the processes that shape our lives between conception and death. We will cover issues related to physiological/biological, cognitive/linguistic, and social/emotional development. A theme throughout this course is an exploration of the lifelong interaction between nature and nurture. This course also focuses on developing an understanding of the concepts, methods, research findings, and applied knowledge central to the study of developmental psychology. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 252-01

Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: *ACTC students may register with permission of the instructor*

This course will examine the experiences, causes, and treatments of the major forms of distress and disorder codified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, stress disorders, and personality disorders. We will critically evaluate theories and research derived from biological, genetic, psychological, interpersonal, and social-cultural perspectives. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 254-01

Social Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Yi Xiao

Notes: This course will survey the ways in which social phenomena influence the thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals. The major theories, experiments, and issues associated with social psychology will be examined. Sample topics include love, aggression, conformity, attitudes, prejudice, persuasion, obedience, and attribution. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 294-01

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Grabow, Halperin

Notes: Industrial-organizational (I/O) psychology is the scientific study of people in organizations — and the application of that science to workplace issues facing individuals, teams, organizations and society. This course will introduce you to the science and practice of I/O Psychology, and what I/O Psychology has to offer anyone who plans to lead others or to help develop effective organizations. Topics will include how to determine what to look for in candidates for hire, how to evaluate candidates for hire or promotion, how best to manage performance in organizations, what’s been shown to motivate people, employee retention, team effectiveness, and organizational culture.

PSYC 294-02

Enactments:Theaters/Therapies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Cleary, Strauss

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with THDA 294-01* Theaters/Therapies is a semester-long inquiry into the dynamic, complex, and generative intersections between psychology and performance. Beginning with Freud’s epiphanies about personality while viewing a staged production of Oedipus Rex, the course uses psychoanalytic theory to reveal and interrogate audiences’ and actors’ psychological experience alongside therapists’ and clients’ dramatic experience. We explore plays about therapy; improvisation as a therapeutic and performance practice; empathy, emotion and spectatorship; and the transformative capacity of “what if?” role-playing. The course also invites reflections on the intertwined worlds of theater and therapy in promoting social justice.

PSYC 301-01

Research in Psychology II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Open only to declared Psychology majors*

This course continues instruction begun in Psychology 201. We more closely examine key factors for planning and implementing research studies, such as validity, variable operationalization, and common ethical dilemmas faced by psychologists. Students gain in-depth experience in developing, interpreting, and communicating different types of empirical psychological research designs (e.g., experiments, surveys). (4 credits)

PSYC 350-01

Social Identities in Developing Lives

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Cari Gillen-O'Neel

Notes: *First day attendance required*

All of us belong to several social groups, including race/ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexual orientation. On the one hand, social groups can provide us with identity, community, and pride, but on the other hand, we may face stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination as a reslut of how our groups are seen in society. How do children experience these different aspects of social groups? When do children even realize that they are members of these groups? At which ages or under which circumstances do children derive identity, community, and pride from their groups? If children face discrimination, do they understand what happened? What consequences does discrimination have for other aspects of children's development? In this course we will draw from developmental and social psychological perspectives to explore these questions and more. (4 credits)

PSYC 374-01

Clinical and Counseling Psychology

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Timothy Baardseth

Notes: This course examines specific applications of psychological principles to the mental health field by exploring strategies for therapeutic intervention. We will discuss a wide range of approaches (e.g., psychoanalysis; humanistic therapy; cognitive behavioral and dialectical behavior therapy; mindfulness based stress reduction; family therapy; art therapy) and we will consider issues raised by traditional clinical practice, such as ethics, the politics and economics of mental health, and cultural biases. NOTE: Course not available to students who have taken European Clinical Psychology through the DIS study away program. (4 credits)


PSYC 394-01

Attitudes and Persuasion

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Yi Xiao

Notes: What determines our likes and dislikes—our attitudes—about people, consumer products, and ideas? How can we measure these preferences? How do our attitudes influence behavior? Is it possible to hold attitudes that we are not aware of? Can our attitudes ever be changed, and what makes a strong persuasive message? It is clear that understanding attitudes is fundamental for understanding many topics of interest to social scientists—impression formation, group stereotypes, marketing and consumer behavior, jury decision-making, political preferences, and many others. This course will provide an intellectual forum for discussing attitudes and persuasion from a social psychological perspective. Students will use materials from books, scholarly research articles, and video/film clips to explore topics such as attitude formation and structure, self-perception, attitude measurement, ambivalent attitude, the attitude-behavior relationship, attitude change, social influence and persuasion, dissonance, implicit attitude, attitude about groups, and so on. We will rely on scientific experiments and theories to approach each of these topics. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions, provide written reaction papers, and develop a final research proposal.

PSYC 394-02

Brain and Emotion

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: THEATR 205
  • Instructor: Julia Manor

Notes: *Cross-listed with NEUR 394-01* In this course, students will be introduced to the growing field of affective neuroscience. This is a field that has long been controversial because it relies on private experiences. Animal models are often necessary for the controlled study of emotions, but many scientists have denied the existence of animal emotions. We will explore the evidence for emotional systems and experiences in animals and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The format of the seminar will include student led discussion of recent topics in the study of affective neuroscience. Topics will include: love and sexuality, anger and aggression, and play and laughter. We will also look at the connections of these emotional systems to development and psychiatric disorders.

PSYC 394-03

Psychology of Globalization

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Anjali Dutt

Notes: Globalization is the growing interconnection of cultures and societies worldwide. In this course we will examine how methods and theories from psychology can contribute to understanding this phenomena. We will also discuss how globalization relates to inequalities, and in turn, how and why it has important implications for psychological research. Questions to be discussed include: In what ways does globalization impact ideology? How are individuals and communities impacted by changing international structures? And, in what ways does our increasing interconnection help or impede our abilities to address social issues at a global level, such as social inequalities and environmental concerns? Students will complete semester long research projects on relevant topics of their choosing. Fulfills the UP3 requirement.

PSYC 394-04

Social Cognitive Neuroscience

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Katie Broadwell

Notes: The field of social cognitive neuroscience is relatively new, but has already produced many groundbreaking studies. This interdisciplinary research approach uses neuroscientific techniques to investigate questions about how the brain implements social processes, behaviors and cognitions. In this discussion-based seminar, we will read articles from the social cognitive neuroscience literature covering topics as diverse as political cognition, theory of mind, relationship perceptions, game theory, and self-other judgments. For each topic, we will examine the neural evidence and discover how various brain areas play a role in social interactions and the ways we think about those social interactions.

PSYC 401-01

Directed Research in Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Gillen-O'Neel, Strauss

Notes: Students are involved and guided in conducting research within specific content areas approved by the supervising faculty. Research may be conducted individually or in small groups depending on the content area. Research groups meet regularly for presentation of background material, discussions of common readings, and reports on project status. Directed research is typically taken in the junior year and is open only to declared majors. Students will be assigned to sections by the supervising faculty. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the major in Psychology. (4 credits)

PSYC 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as Cross-listed with Economics 490. 4 credits

Fall 2017

PSYC 100-01

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Joan Ostrove

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-02

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Jhon Wlaschin

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L1

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L2

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L3

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L4

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 180-01

Brain, Mind, and Behavior

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Deborah Kreiss

Notes: A multidisciplinary investigation of behavior and the nervous system. Particular emphasis is placed on human processes of perception, cognition, learning, memory, and language. This course also serves as the introductory course for the neuroscience studies major. (4 credits)

PSYC 194-01

Psychology of Right and Wrong

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: *First Year Course only*


PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L1

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L2

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 220-01

Educational Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Tina Kruse

Notes: *Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*

An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings. (4 credits)

PSYC 242-01

Cognitive Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Ariel James

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 242-L1

Cognitive Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Ariel James

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 243-01

Psychological Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 243-01*

This course explores the relationship between self, culture and society. We will examine and discuss critically the broad array of methods and theories anthropologists use to analyze personality, socialization, mental illnes and cognition in different societies. Our aim is to address questions related to the cultural patterning of personality, the self and emotions and to understand how culture might shape ideas of what a person is. We will also seek to understand how cultures define behavior as abnormal, pathological or insane, and how they make sense of trauma and suffering. Cross-listed as Anthropology 243. (4 credits)

PSYC 244-01

Cognitive Neuroscience

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Permission of the instructor is required for ACTC students*

Cognitive neuroscience is a relatively recent discipline that combines cognitive science and cognitive psychology with biology and neuroscience to investigate how the brain enables the myriad of complex functions we know as the mind. This course will explore basic concepts and contemporary topics in the field, focusing in particular on the methods used in cognitive neuroscience research. Through lecture and lab sessions, students will learn to read and interpret primary source material, design and implement cognitive neuroscience studies, and present research in verbal and written forms. Overall, students will gain an appreciation for the amazing intricacy of the brain-mind relationship, as well as a sense of how this relationship may be understood eventually using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Group A course. (4 credits)

PSYC 244-L1

Cognitive Neuroscience Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Permission of the instructor is required for ACTC students*

Cognitive neuroscience is a relatively recent discipline that combines cognitive science and cognitive psychology with biology and neuroscience to investigate how the brain enables the myriad of complex functions we know as the mind. This course will explore basic concepts and contemporary topics in the field, focusing in particular on the methods used in cognitive neuroscience research. Through lecture and lab sessions, students will learn to read and interpret primary source material, design and implement cognitive neuroscience studies, and present research in verbal and written forms. Overall, students will gain an appreciation for the amazing intricacy of the brain-mind relationship, as well as a sense of how this relationship may be understood eventually using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Group A course. (4 credits)

PSYC 254-01

Social Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: This course will survey the ways in which social phenomena influence the thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals. The major theories, experiments, and issues associated with social psychology will be examined. Sample topics include love, aggression, conformity, attitudes, prejudice, persuasion, obedience, and attribution. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 270-01

Psychology of Sustainable Behavior

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Christina Manning

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 270-01; first day attendance required*

This course is built around the argument that "environmental problems" do not exist; they are in fact human behavior problems. Thus, if we want to craft effective solutions to issues such as ocean acidification, air pollution, or climate change, we must start with the human behaviors that lead to them. We will cover psychological principles, theories, and methods and explore the complex web of factors underlying environmentally sustainable and unsustainable actions. A strong theme throughout the semester is the intersection of identity - personal, social, and cultural - and environmentalism. We will explore questions such as, "Why do some groups of people feel a part of the sustainability movement while others feel alienated from it or skeptical of it?"; "Who takes action on behalf of the natural environment, under what circumstances, and why?"; and "How can we create contexts that promote true sustainability?" Psychology of Sustainable Behavior is a project-based class with a strong civic engagement component. Students will participate in three class projects: a self-change project (2.5 weeks), a community-based collaborative project (5 weeks), and a communication/education project (3 weeks). Criss-listed as Environmental Studies 270. (4 credits)

PSYC 272-01

Health Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: This course will examine multiple, interactive factors that contribute to human health; we will take a biopsychsocial perspective to understanding how best to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and adapt and thrive in the context of chronic illness. We will discuss the roles of stress, coping, immune response, social relationships, personality, and structural inequalities in the progression and prevention of disease. We will also address some ways in which behaviors (e.g. physical activity, nutrition, substance use, sleep) can contribute to wellbeing or sickness, and we will examine behavior change strategies that can help improve our own health habits. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 301-01

Research in Psychology II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Cari Gillen-O'Neel

Notes: *Open only to declared Psychology majors*

This course continues instruction begun in Psychology 201. We more closely examine key factors for planning and implementing research studies, such as validity, variable operationalization, and common ethical dilemmas faced by psychologists. Students gain in-depth experience in developing, interpreting, and communicating different types of empirical psychological research designs (e.g., experiments, surveys). (4 credits)

PSYC 350-01

Social Identities in Developing Lives

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Cari Gillen-O'Neel

Notes: All of us belong to several social groups, including race/ethnicity, gender, religion, and sexual orientation. On the one hand, social groups can provide us with identity, community, and pride, but on the other hand, we may face stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination as a reslut of how our groups are seen in society. How do children experience these different aspects of social groups? When do children even realize that they are members of these groups? At which ages or under which circumstances do children derive identity, community, and pride from their groups? If children face discrimination, do they understand what happened? What consequences does discrimination have for other aspects of children's development? In this course we will draw from developmental and social psychological perspectives to explore these questions and more. (4 credits)

PSYC 380-01

Community Psychology and Public Health

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

This course will examine the inter-related fields of community psychology and public health psychology. These disciplines share a commitment to the promotion of well-being within a social and cultural context. We will explore theory, research, and praxis related to ecological analysis, empowerment models, prevention and health promotion, risk and resilience, and community organizing and activism. These conceptual tools will help us understand the complex processes underlying clinical psychopathology (e.g., serious and persistent mental illness), behavioral health (e.g., smoking; obesity; substance abuse), and symptoms of structural violence (e.g., domestic violence; homelessness). Throughout the course, we will focus on the unique contributions of psychological scholarship to understanding and improving population health. All students will participate in a civic engagement experience of at least two hours a week to foster fuller understanding of the course concepts. Student led component. UP3 course. (4 credits)

PSYC 394-01

Neurobiology of Anxiety and Depression

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Deborah Kreiss

Notes: This seminar addresses neurobiological approaches for the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders. We discuss how therapeutic strategies have evolved along with our understanding of the etiology of these disorders and the advantages/disadvantages of past and current therapeutic methodologies. We explore the development of novel techniques that may shape the future treatment of these debilitating disorders. Pre-requisite: PSYC/NEUR 180 and either MATH 155 or PSYC 201

PSYC 394-02

Psychology of Climate Change

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Christina Manning

Notes: Climate change is no longer a distant, hypothetical threat. Yet, though nearly half of Americans are “concerned” or “alarmed” about global warming, few are taking significant personal action in response, and only a small minority are involved in civic action to address the issue.

This course will take a broad psychological perspective on the question, “Why are we not doing enough to address global climate change?” The class will begin with the lens of evolutionary psychology to understand why historically adaptive behaviors are problematic in the face of climate change. We will then turn to cognitive psychology to describe the mental and emotional processes that underlie the judgments and decisions we make when faced with data vs. personal experience. We will also explore social psychological theories and studies that help explain why people deny climate change even in places where its impacts are likely to be severe. Toward the end of the semester, we will touch on emerging topics such as the psychology of community action, the psychological perspective on environmental justice, and the fundamental importance of reconnecting our urban, technology-addicted society to the natural world. PREREQUISITES: Psych 100, and MATH 155 or PSYC 201.

PSYC 394-03

Applied Social Psychology: Nudging Behavior and Social Change

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Jhon Wlaschin

Notes: This course is designed for students who are interested in behavior change and wish to develop insights and skills toward influencing positive social policy. Given the increasing technological, environmental and personal complexity of modern life, people and societies are relying on social psychological principals for sophisticated methods to understand and improve social and professional functioning. This course will provide an overview of practical ways in which social psychological theory and research have been applied to understand and deal effectively with problems in everyday life. We will explore research and policy initiatives that address social concerns in areas such as law enforcement, consumer behavior, education, environmental policy, political behavior and health. In particular, we will review the ongoing work of government agencies such as the Behavioral Insights Team (Nudge Unit) in Great Britain who have used evidence and innovation to promote government performance and efficiency. Students will collaborate on identifying a particular social concern in an area they are interested in and will create an intervention strategy as a final project. Prerequisites: PSYC 100, and PSYC 201 or MATH 155

PSYC 401-01

Directed Research in Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Burgund, Ostrove, Strauss

Notes: Students are involved and guided in conducting research within specific content areas approved by the supervising faculty. Research may be conducted individually or in small groups depending on the content area. Research groups meet regularly for presentation of background material, discussions of common readings, and reports on project status. Directed research is typically taken in the junior year and is open only to declared majors. Students will be assigned to sections by the supervising faculty. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the major in Psychology. (4 credits)

PSYC 401-01

Directed Research in Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Burgund, Ostrove, Strauss

Notes: Students are involved and guided in conducting research within specific content areas approved by the supervising faculty. Research may be conducted individually or in small groups depending on the content area. Research groups meet regularly for presentation of background material, discussions of common readings, and reports on project status. Directed research is typically taken in the junior year and is open only to declared majors. Students will be assigned to sections by the supervising faculty. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the major in Psychology. (4 credits)

PSYC 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 490-01; Capstone course*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as Group E elective for the Economics major. Cross-listed with Economics 490. 4 credits

Spring 2018

PSYC 100-01

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jhon Wlaschin

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-02

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ariel James

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L1

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L2

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L3

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-L4

Introduction to Psychology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jamie Atkins

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 180-01

Brain, Mind, and Behavior

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: A multidisciplinary investigation of behavior and the nervous system. Particular emphasis is placed on human processes of perception, cognition, learning, memory, and language. This course also serves as the introductory course for the neuroscience studies major. (4 credits)

PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L1

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L2

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 220-01

Educational Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Tina Kruse

Notes: *Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*

An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings. (4 credits)

PSYC 242-01

Cognitive Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 242-L1

Cognitive Psychology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 248-01

Behavioral Neuroscience

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: An examination of the role of the nervous system in the control of behavior. While the course features a systems approach to the investigation of sensory and perceptual mechanisms, molecular, cellular and cognitive components of the nervous system will also be discussed in the context of course topics. Particular emphasis is given to the nature of learning, memory, and motor processes, motivation, emotion, homeostasis, cognition, and human neuropsychology. The laboratory will be used for a variety of instructor-demonstrative and student participatory research and laboratory activities. Fulfills Group A requirement for Psychology. (4 credits)

PSYC 248-L1

Behavioral Neuroscience Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: An examination of the role of the nervous system in the control of behavior. While the course features a systems approach to the investigation of sensory and perceptual mechanisms, molecular, cellular and cognitive components of the nervous system will also be discussed in the context of course topics. Particular emphasis is given to the nature of learning, memory, and motor processes, motivation, emotion, homeostasis, cognition, and human neuropsychology. The laboratory will be used for a variety of instructor-demonstrative and student participatory research and laboratory activities. Fulfills Group A requirement for Psychology. (4 credits)

PSYC 250-01

Developmental Psychology

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: This is a course in lifespan human development; as such, we examine psychological theories and research to describe, understand, and explain the processes that shape our lives between conception and death. We will cover issues related to physiological/biological, cognitive/linguistic, and social/emotional development. A theme throughout this course is an exploration of the lifelong interaction between nature and nurture. This course also focuses on developing an understanding of the concepts, methods, research findings, and applied knowledge central to the study of developmental psychology. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 252-01

Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: This course will examine the experiences, causes, and treatments of the major forms of distress and disorder codified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, stress disorders, and personality disorders. We will critically evaluate theories and research derived from biological, genetic, psychological, interpersonal, and social-cultural perspectives. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 264-01

The Psychology of Gender

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Joan Ostrove

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 264-01*

This class is an introduction to feminist psychological theory and research dedicated to understanding and critiquing biological, psychological, social, and cultural meanings and implications of gender and its intersections with class, race, physical ability, sexual orientation, etc. Examples of research and theory will come from a wide variety of areas in psychology and related disciplines, and will address such issues as socialization and social development, stereotypes, bodies and body image, social relationships, identity, language, violence, sexuality and sexual behavior, well-being, work, etc. We will also learn about the historical, cultural, and epistemological underpinnings of psychological research on gender. Counts as a UP3 course. Cross-listed with Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 264. (4 credits)


PSYC 294-01

Industrial/Organizational Psyc

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Grabow, Halperin

Notes:

PSYC 301-01

Research in Psychology II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Open only to declared Psychology majors*

This course continues instruction begun in Psychology 201. We more closely examine key factors for planning and implementing research studies, such as validity, variable operationalization, and common ethical dilemmas faced by psychologists. Students gain in-depth experience in developing, interpreting, and communicating different types of empirical psychological research designs (e.g., experiments, surveys). (4 credits)

PSYC 374-01

Clinical and Counseling Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: *ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course examines specific applications of psychological principles to the mental health field by exploring strategies for therapeutic intervention. We will discuss a wide range of approaches (e.g., psychoanalysis; humanistic therapy; cognitive behavioral and dialectical behavior therapy; mindfulness based stress reduction; family therapy; art therapy) and we will consider issues raised by traditional clinical practice, such as ethics, the politics and economics of mental health, and cultural biases. NOTE: Course not available to students who have taken European Clinical Psychology through the DIS study away program. (4 credits)


PSYC 377-01

Moral Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course will explore how and why we make moral judgments about people and their behavior. How are our moral judgments shaped by intuition, emotion, and reasoning? Which kinds of behaviors do we view as immoral? Do we ever put the interests of our broader group or community above our own self-interest? What are the evolutionary and developmental origins of moral judgements? How do we balance punishment motives of retribution and deterrence, and how do these relate to policy decisions about capital punishment? Could a robot have moral rights and responsibilities? In this course we will examine these questions by considering theories and findings from social, developmental, evolutionary, and political psychology, as well as from related fields like philosophy and artificial intelligence. Offered every year. (4 credits)

PSYC 385-01

Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive technique used to provide indirect measures of neural activity in healthy (and unhealthy) humans. Although the technique has been readily available to researchers for only about 20 years, its popularity and use has grown tremendously in the last 10, and we now see it influencing aspects of culture and society not traditionally based in biomedical research (i.e., law, politics, economics). This course will cover the mechanics of fMRI, evaluate its strengths and weaknesses, and explore recent applications that have received wide and sometimes controversial media coverage. By the end of the course, students will understand essential components of the fMRI technique and be informed consumers of primary and secondary source reports involving brain imaging. Student led component. (4 credits)

PSYC 394-01

Psychology and/of Disability

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Joan Ostrove

Notes:

PSYC 394-02

Intelligence

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ariel James

Notes:

PSYC 401-01

Directed Research in Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Burgund, Lea, Strauss

Notes: Students are involved and guided in conducting research within specific content areas approved by the supervising faculty. Research may be conducted individually or in small groups depending on the content area. Research groups meet regularly for presentation of background material, discussions of common readings, and reports on project status. Directed research is typically taken in the junior year and is open only to declared majors. Students will be assigned to sections by the supervising faculty. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the major in Psychology. (4 credits)

PSYC 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as Group E elective for the Economics major. Cross-listed with Economics 490. 4 credits