Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

SOCI 170-01

Sociology of Work

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: This course will examine recent transformations in the U.S. economy - including deskilling, downsizing, and the rise of the service sector - and it will consider how each of these "transformations" relate to issues of identity, community, family formation, structural inequality and national culture. Work has changed so quickly in the last three decades that we have yet to fully comprehend the micro level consequences in our daily lives and the macro level consequences for American culture and global processes. 4 credits

SOCI 175-01

Sociolinguistics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Marianne Milligan

Notes: *Cross-listed with LING 175-01; instructor is looking for class breakdown to be 5 seats Sr/Jr, 10 seats Soph and 5 seats FY students.*

Sociolinguistics is the study of the linguistic diversity. Language and culture are so closely tied that it is nearly impossible to discuss language variation without also understanding its relation to culture, and diversity in language often stands as a symbol of ethnic and social diversity. This course introduces students to the overwhelming amount of linguistic diversity in the United States and elsewhere, while at the same time making them aware of the cultural prejudices inherent in our attitude towards people who speak differently from us. The class involves analysis and discussion of the readings, setting the stage for exploration assignments, allowing students to do their own research on linguistic diversity. (4 credits.)


SOCI 180-01

Sociology of Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: When sociologists look at culture they look at things like people's leisure activities, consumption patterns, style, membership in subcultural groups, and the arts. A common thread throughout most of these studies of culture is how social class and culture intersect. For example, how do people's class backgrounds influence their forms of cultural expression in terms of their leisure activities, their beliefs, their personal style, or whom they want to hang out with? This course will explore these issues, focusing on class as a common theme. Specific topics include: the role of artists and people's development of aesthetic taste in the arts; social forces that push us towards conformity or towards individualism; subcultural groups; and how people make distinctions between themselves and those who they describe as "other." (4 credits)


SOCI 194-03

Progress and Identity: Race, Gender and Social Movements

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Aisha Upton

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 194-01 and WGSS 194-01* In many contemporary social movements, the roles of race and class may either seem obvious or relatively easy to ascertain. But what happens when we add gender to this mix? What are the different roles that women take on in social movements and how can we account for differences across movements? How do gender, race, and class intersect in social movements? For example, what happens when we compare the ideas of progress in Black Lives Matter and white nationalist movements with particular emphasis on women’s place(s) in the future? In this course, we scrutinize the intersections of race, class, and gender as they relate to the ideals to which movements aspire. Social movements that emphasize concepts such as progress, development, and nation-making indicate visions of the future that can illuminate how gender, race, and class shape peoples’ lives. We will focus on the experiences of women (as individuals and as members of groups or organizations) in their historical and structural locations and explore what concepts such as progress, development, and nation-making mean for women in the struggle over feminist meanings and claims.

SOCI 269-01

Social Science Inquiry

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: Social science presents claims about the social world in a particular manner that is centered on theoretical claims (explanations) supported by evidence. This course covers the methods through which social scientists develop emprically-supported explanations. The course covers three main sets of topics: the broad methodological questions posed by philosophy of social science, how social scientists develop research design to generate relevant evidence, and methods with which social scientists analyze data. For both the research design and analysis sections, we will concentrate on quantitative research, learning how to use statistical software. (4 credits)

SOCI 272-01

Social Theories

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Khaldoun Samman

Notes: This course is designed to engage students with the most sophisticated and useful schools of thought available in the social science disciplines. The course raises a number of questions: How can we best understand the complexities of self and society? Are these units of analysis useful in and of themselves? Are they contained in an essential body or polity that we can identify as some unitary entity

called Jenny and John Doe, American, French, Arab/Jew, black/white, modern/primitive, developed/underdeveloped, Oriental/ Occidental, homo/heterosexual, male/female? Or are they socially produced units that have no essence in-of-themselves, produced and made real only through performance with the "Other"? Furthermore, is there something unique about modernity that has fundamentally transformed the notions of our selves, bodies, polities, races, and civilizations? If the answer to the last question is in the affirmative, how and why did this come to be the case, and what consequences does it hold for our

understanding of the past and of the future? These are the kinds of questions that great figures in sociology have been asking since the nineteenth-century, including classic theorists like Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Karl Marx, as well as more recent writers such as Ervin Goffman, Michel Foucault, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Edward Said.

SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

SOCI 290-01

Colonialism, Modernity, and Identities in the Middle East

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Khaldoun Samman

Notes: How can we best understand the complexities of the present U.S. "War on Terrorism"? Should it be understood as a clash between two different cultural systems, one modern and democratic and the other feudal and fanatic? Or, is the violence systemic, taking a variety of forms in different parts of the globe? What role does power and inequality on a global scale have to do with it? These and many other questions will be dealt with in this course. We will trace the conflict historically to assess moments of violence and tensions and other periods of calm and symbioses. Finally, we will analyze how modernity transformed the relationship between Islam and the West, Jew and Arab, male and female, and nation/race and identity. (4 credits)


SOCI 294-01

Consumerism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: Throughout the last century, consumerism has increasingly come to dominate American society even as public concern over issues of sustainability continues to heighten, and widening ranks of social actors –from individuals, communities, and non-profit groups to private corporations – deepen their commitment to sustainable practices. In this course, we apply a sociological perspective to examine the significance of a culture of consumption, paying particular attention to the possibilities for sustainability within a consumption-oriented society. Contextualizing the cultural meanings of consumption within the social forces that shape consumption practices, the course will consider various configurations of consumption in American society, including how consumption structures and reproduces social difference and inequality, the role of consumer practices in the constitution of personal identity, sociability and leisure, the role of marketing and advertising, branding and embodied consumer display, and the location of consumption as a site of sub-cultural resistance. In the context of the study of consumption, we will likewise examine emergent configurations of sustainability, asking how individuals, communities, social groups and organizations in contemporary consumer culture are (differently) defining the pursuit and practice of sustainability through, for instance, anti-consumerism, the green movement, fair trade, “green capitalism,” voluntary simplicity, downshifting, slow living, frugal living, radical consumption and ethical consumption. The course will explore how the social forces of consumer society shape, support and contend these sustainability projects, and, by tracing contemporary beliefs and assumptions about sustainability against a sociological understanding of consumer culture, push us to identify and critically access the possibilities within consumer culture for creating a socially and environmentally sustainable future.

SOCI 294-02

Neoliberalism, Poverty, and Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Rebecca Stepnitz

Notes: This course examines the growth of and changes in neoliberalism from the 20 th century to today. Who or what is a neoliberal? What is “neo” about neoliberalism? What changes has neoliberalism brought about and how have these changes affected how we approach questions concerning poverty and international development? Often, people examine neoliberalism as a form of governance—that is, as a means to allocate the power to make decisions and establishment of the criteria on which decisions are judged. From this perspective, neoliberalism rearranged relations between states and markets. In this course, we examine this perspective but also build on it to consider neoliberalism as a cultural and ideological phenomenon that affects the perception of problems and conception of solutions. We learn and apply sociological theories of state-market relationships to explore the changing role of economic markets. From this foundation, we will draw on insights from diverse perspectives (including history, cultural sociology, economic sociology, and critical geography) to address topics such as:

How ideas about individualism and progress influence the material world and peoples’ lived

experiences; How neoliberalism altered approaches to international development and poverty; and how neoliberal ideas and practices have altered who and what we consider to be the subjects and objects of policy.

SOCI 335-01

Families and Social Change

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Lisa Gulya

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 394-02*

This class focuses on the relationship between families and larger social institutions, including governments, economic institutions, and labor markets. This course also explores how various societal forces shape relationships within contemporary American families, as well as considering other historical forms and understandings of the family. (4 credits)


Fall 2017

SOCI 110-01

Introduction to Sociology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Lesley Kandaras

Notes: The course introduces students to the sociological imagination, or "the quality of mind essential to grasp the interplay of individual and society, of biography and history, of self and the world,” as C. Wright Mills dscribed it. The enduring value of a sociological imagination is to help students situate peoples' lives and important events in broader social contexts by understanding how political, economic, and cultural forces constitute social life. Sociology explores minute aspects of social life (microsociology) as well as global social processes and structures (macrosociology). Topics covered vary from semester to semester, but may include: socialization, suburbanization and housing, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class stratification, deviance and crime, economic and global inequality, families and intimate relationships, education, religion, and globalization. (4 credits)

SOCI 170-01

Work, Identity, and Inequality

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: This course will examine recent transformations in the U.S. economy - including deskilling, downsizing, and the rise of the service sector - and it will consider how each of these "transformations" relate to issues of identity, community, family formation, structural inequality and national culture. Work has changed so quickly in the last three decades that we have yet to fully comprehend the micro level consequences in our daily lives and the macro level consequences for American culture and global processes. 4 credits

SOCI 194-01

The Rise of Right Wing Populism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Khaldoun Samman

Notes: This course seeks to understand Donald Trump’s election as part of a larger pattern of backlash against the existing political, economic, and social order. The course focuses on Trump’s rise as the most visible example of the rise of rise of right wing populism, but will also use some comparative material to examine similar right-wing populist insurgencies in Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America. We will explore the debates of how best to explain populism, reading material from a variety of disciplines. Along the way, we will address questions such as: What is populism and how do we study it? What distinguishes populists from traditional political elites? What social forces produce populism and can they account for how populist movements have varied over time? Is populism always a right wing phenomenon associated with xenophobia, racism, and sexism or can a left-wing, progressive populism be a constructive force of social change? In answering these questions, we will critically assess popular explanations for Trump’s rise, including arguments about the idea of “white rage,” the rebellion of the white working class, and the emasculation of men.

SOCI 205-01

Public Schooling in America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Terry Boychuk

Notes: *First Year Course only*

As Frederick Rudolf aptly noted, the history of American education "is American history" and reveals "the central purposes and driving directions of American society." The advent of mass schooling represents a profound exercise in collective self-definition. As with much else in a democracy, deciding whom to teach, what to teach, and how to teach have been subjects of lively debate in the US from the early nineteenth century to the dawning of the twenty-first. This course offers a broad overview of the overarching political controversies durrounding the historical development of public schooling in America. We begin with a survey of 19th-century movements to define elementary schooling as the chosen instrument for nation-building, for safeguarding democratic self-governance, and for resolving with the cascading social disorders implicated in the rise of urbanization, mass immigration, and industrial capitalism. The rise of high schools in the early twentieth century is the second major topic of interest, and more specifically, progressive-era debates about the relationship between public schools and colleges and universities. This era begets the great ideological fault-lines underlying educational theory and practice in the US that lasted the 20th century into the 21st. The dramatic post-war reconstruction of public schooling is the third major focus of the course. We explore the proliferation of federal government mandates to secularize, integrate, assimilate, equalize, multiculturalize, and expunge racism and sexism from the curriculum, all the while raising academic standards for all. With these directivescame vastly expanded government funding for social science research trained on evaluating public schools' efforts to realize these new benchmarks of educational progress. We observe this rebirth of the social sciences as arbiters of educational policy debates. The final section of the course revolves around contemporary disputes over school choice policies and the federal No-Child-Left-Behind initiatives. These latest campaigns to democratize academic excellence have followed a familiar, recurring script of US policy making since the 1980s: deregulation, de-centralization, consumer choice, managerial and administrative prerogatives in public agencies re-invented in the image of governance in the corporate sector, and the elaboration of benchmarks to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of educational practices. We consider how recent experience indicate limitations to privatization, corporatization, and marketization as solutions to the educational crisis, and perhaps, suggest the beginnings of a renewed search for answers to the riddle of public education.

SOCI 232-01

Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MARKIM LOWER
  • Instructor: Kate Reiling

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 232-01; first day attendance required; students that have completed the Economics Department Entrepreneurship course cannot enroll in this course*

This course is focused and driven by student team project work. Students will prioritize social problems / issues for which they would like to engage in the creation / implementation of a solution. They will spend the semester working to more deeply understand the problems, research successful and failed attempts to resolve the problem in other contexts, and to generate a solution that includes a well researched model for introducing sustainable social change. It is through this engagement that students will grapple with the challenging realities of practice and implementation. Students will study several methodologies including Lean Startup, Human Centered Design, Participatory Poverty Assessment and Impact Gap Analysis. Students will learn through their own experiences and utilize case studies comparing problems, their root causes and the entrepreneurial approaches deployed to address them from various countries and cultural contexts. (4 credits)

SOCI 275-01

Comparative-Historical Sociology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Terry Boychuk

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 250-01*

The course introduces students to principles of cross-national and cross-cultural analysis. The class begins with a survey of the basic methodological orientations that distinguish various modes of analysis in the social sciences. The lectures and discussions in this section provide a general introduction to the logic of causal analysis, explore the relative strengths and weaknesses of differing methodological approaches to understanding social phenomena, and specifically, consider in greater detail the distinctive blend of theoretical, methodological, and empirical concerns that inform comparative-historical social science. The substantive topics of the course include: the Social Origins of the Modern State; the Sociology of Democracy and Authoritarianism; the Sociology of Revolution; and The Rise of the Welfare State. (4 credits)


SOCI 294-01

Immigrant Voices

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Erika Busse-Cardenas

Notes: During the past half century, international migration has rapidly expanded: from 2000 to 2015, the number of migrants increased by over 40%. This growth reflects both policy changes (such as the 1965 policy in the United States that removed an explicitly race-based regime) and international developments. This course examines migration as a global phenomenon addressing questions such as: What motivates people to migrate and what distinguishes migrants from those who remain in their home countries? How does migration reconfigure social relationships, such as parental and community relations? How should we understand the different frameworks of immigration policies (e.g., security, human rights, economic growth) and the consequences of these different policy emphases? The course addresses these questions by drawing on recent research about both immigration policies and immigrant experiences.


SOCI 294-02

Class Cultures and Class Identities

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: In popular discourse, the category of class is often missing, misunderstood as temporary and not institutionalized, displaced onto other discourses of difference such as race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality, or mystified within an ideology of individualism. In this course, we adopt a sociological lens to examine the systematic operation of class divisions through cultural mediums, considering how class identities become formulated and class cultures become differentiated within varying institutional contexts. Our study will track the category of class along multiple lines of cultural distinction, examining class subjectivity as it is constructed in relation to gender, race, and sexual identity, and as it is built around moral discourses of difference and symbolic economies of style, taste, and preference.

SOCI 335-01

Families and Social Change

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Erika Busse-Cardenas

Notes: This class focuses on the relationship between families and larger social institutions, including governments, economic institutions, and labor markets. This course also explores how various societal forces shape relationships within contemporary American families, as well as considering other historical forms and understandings of the family. (4 credits)


SOCI 480-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Samman, Smith

Notes: This senior seminar serves as the capstone experience for sociology majors. This class provides students with an opportunity to develop a synthetic understanding of their sociology course work and to conduct prospective research that may culminate in honors projects. (4 credits)


Spring 2018

SOCI 110-01

Introduction to Sociology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Khaldoun Samman

Notes: The course introduces students to the sociological imagination, or "the quality of mind essential to grasp the interplay of individual and society, of biography and history, of self and the world,” as C. Wright Mills dscribed it. The enduring value of a sociological imagination is to help students situate peoples' lives and important events in broader social contexts by understanding how political, economic, and cultural forces constitute social life. Sociology explores minute aspects of social life (microsociology) as well as global social processes and structures (macrosociology). Topics covered vary from semester to semester, but may include: socialization, suburbanization and housing, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class stratification, deviance and crime, economic and global inequality, families and intimate relationships, education, religion, and globalization. (4 credits)

SOCI 175-01

Sociolinguistics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Marianne Milligan

Notes: *Cross-listed with LING 175-01*

Sociolinguistics is the study of the linguistic diversity. Language and culture are so closely tied that it is nearly impossible to discuss language variation without also understanding its relation to culture, and diversity in language often stands as a symbol of ethnic and social diversity. This course introduces students to the overwhelming amount of linguistic diversity in the United States and elsewhere, while at the same time making them aware of the cultural prejudices inherent in our attitude towards people who speak differently from us. The class involves analysis and discussion of the readings, setting the stage for exploration assignments, allowing students to do their own research on linguistic diversity. (4 credits.)


SOCI 180-01

Sociology of Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erika Busse-Cardenas

Notes: When sociologists look at culture they look at things like people's leisure activities, consumption patterns, style, membership in subcultural groups, and the arts. A common thread throughout most of these studies of culture is how social class and culture intersect. For example, how do people's class backgrounds influence their forms of cultural expression in terms of their leisure activities, their beliefs, their personal style, or whom they want to hang out with? This course will explore these issues, focusing on class as a common theme. Specific topics include: the role of artists and people's development of aesthetic taste in the arts; social forces that push us towards conformity or towards individualism; subcultural groups; and how people make distinctions between themselves and those who they describe as "other." (4 credits)


SOCI 194-01

Sports, Violence, and Civilization

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Terry Boychuk

Notes:

SOCI 194-02

Fascism and Sacred Community

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Davis, Samman

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 194-01*


SOCI 210-01

Sociology of Sexuality

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: What is social about sexuality? Sexuality and its components (desire, pleasure, love, the body) is something more than a personal or individual characteristic. It is socially constructed. Sexuality has been configured during different historical time periods as sin, as a means of fostering alliances between powerful families, as perversion, as a means to pleasure, as a symbol of love, and as personal identity. These different sexual configurations are connected with larger social-historical trends such as the development of capitalism, the use of rationalized technologies, and the expansion of scientific-medical discourse. In this course, we explore how sexuality has been constructed through history. We examine how categories shape our understanding of sexuality such as male/female, heterosexual/homosexual/queer. We also will address issues such as child sexuality, prostitution, images of sexual minorities in the media and heteronormativity. (4 credits)


SOCI 220-01

Sociology of Race/Ethnicity

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erika Busse-Cardenas

Notes: This course explores historical and contemporary perspectives on racial and ethnic groups in American society, including African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, European Americans, and Americans of Middle Eastern descent. The goal is to develop an understanding of socio-historical forces that have shaped the lives of racial and ethnic groups in America.(4 credits)

SOCI 269-01

Social Science Inquiry

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Terry Boychuk

Notes: Social science presents claims about the social world in a particular manner that is centered on theoretical claims (explanations) supported by evidence. This course covers the methods through which social scientists develop emprically-supported explanations. The course covers three main sets of topics: the broad methodological questions posed by philosophy of social science, how social scientists develop research design to generate relevant evidence, and methods with which social scientists analyze data. For both the research design and analysis sections, we will concentrate on quantitative research, learning how to use statistical software. (4 credits)

SOCI 272-01

Social Theories

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Khaldoun Samman

Notes: This course is designed to engage students with the most sophisticated and useful schools of thought available in the social science disciplines. The course raises a number of questions: How can we best understand the complexities of self and society? Are these units of analysis useful in and of themselves? Are they contained in an essential body or polity that we can identify as some unitary entity

called Jenny and John Doe, American, French, Arab/Jew, black/white, modern/primitive, developed/underdeveloped, Oriental/ Occidental, homo/heterosexual, male/female? Or are they socially produced units that have no essence in-of-themselves, produced and made real only through performance with the "Other"? Furthermore, is there something unique about modernity that has fundamentally transformed the notions of our selves, bodies, polities, races, and civilizations? If the answer to the last question is in the affirmative, how and why did this come to be the case, and what consequences does it hold for our

understanding of the past and of the future? These are the kinds of questions that great figures in sociology have been asking since the nineteenth-century, including classic theorists like Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Karl Marx, as well as more recent writers such as Ervin Goffman, Michel Foucault, Immanuel Wallerstein, and Edward Said.

SOCI 294-01

Consumerism

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Deborah Smith

Notes: