Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

AMST 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. Cross-listed with Geography 341. (4 credits)

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


ENVI 294-04

Intro to Urban Ecology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 294-01* Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between human, urban ecosystems and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will also apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field research, and case studies. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.)

GEOG 294-01

Introduction to Urban Ecology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 294-04* Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between human, urban ecosystems and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will also apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field research, and case studies. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.)

GEOG 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. (4 credits)


GEOG 365-01

Urban GIS

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

This course allows students to participate in a “real world” application of their GIS knowledge and skills in a collaborative research project setting. Project focus is on urban GIS and questions developed by and for neighborhoods and other community research organizations. Content of the course includes development of the research project, acquisition and utilization of data used in urban analysis, data manipulation and analytical techniques unique to urban GIS, and geographical data visualization. Laboratory work is required. (4 credits)

GEOG 365-L1

Urban GIS Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: This course allows students to participate in a “real world” application of their GIS knowledge and skills in a collaborative research project setting. Project focus is on urban GIS and questions developed by and for neighborhoods and other community research organizations. Content of the course includes development of the research project, acquisition and utilization of data used in urban analysis, data manipulation and analytical techniques unique to urban GIS, and geographical data visualization. Laboratory work is required. (4 credits)

GEOG 494-01

Global Urbanism

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First day attendance required* The 21st century is an urban century. Half of the world’s population now lives in cities, with the most rapid growth happening in the developing world. The globalized urban processes compel us to rethink existing urban theories as well as the very definition of the city. In this seminar, we will explore three strands of scholarly works that expand our knowledge about contemporary global urbanism. The first focuses on the scholarship of neoliberal urbanism, which prioritizes North American and Western European urban experiences and shapes the mainstream thinking of cities. The second consists of on-the-ground variegated contestations, which reveal diverse urban living experiences and propose alternatives to the capitalist urbanization process. Finally, there is the scholarship challenging mainstream urban theories with a different epistemological stance, seeking to re-conceptualize urbanization from the global South. In addition to studying these important ways of thinking about global urbanism, students will conduct individual research projects to develop deeper and more concrete understanding of the contemporary urbanization processes. Note: completion of GEOG 241, 261 or 294 (Asian Cities) prior to registering for this seminar is highly encouraged. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.) This is a geography senior capstone seminar.


HIST 394-03

Public History in Action: Rondo Digital History Harvest

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 394-02* This digital history practicum is a hands-on workshop where students will work collaboratively to put on a signature national program called a History Harvest. Created by historians at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, History Harvest is a collaborative, community-based approach to history. The shared experience of giving is at the heart of the History Harvest concept. The project makes invisible histories and materials more visible by working with and within local communities to collect, preserve and share previously unknown or under-appreciated artifacts and stories. Initial "harvests" have taken place in a series of communities across the Great Plains region. At each “harvest,” community-members are invited to bring and share their letters, photographs, objects and stories, and participate in a conversation about the significance and meaning of their materials. Each artifact is digitally captured and then shared in this free web-based archive for general educational use and study. This class will begin by examining the history of Saint Paul’s Historic African American community, Rondo, which was devastated by the development of highway I-94. We will also consider the local and national dimensions and consequences of this tragic event. Since the devastation of their physical community, African Americans who once lived in this vibrant neighborhood have been working collectively to make sure Saint Paul remembers this history and that something like this never happens again. The class will collaborate with community partner, Rondo Avenue, Inc. to implement a History Harvest during spring 2017. After the History Harvest event students will digitally process all of the artifacts in order to make them available to the wider Saint Paul community. No digital skills required but students should know that collaboration, flexibility, and enthusiasm are encouraged for this fun community-based course!

HIST 394-04

Public History in Action - Remembering Rondo: Archives

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Rebecca Wingo

Notes: *Course appropriate for First Years; cross-listed with AMST 394-03* This course has two main foci: archives and digital history. First, we broadly examine the “archive” as records of the past. We will interrogate the role of the archive in preserving and interpreting our knowledge, and explore how institutionalized archives preserve some pasts and repress others. We will cover a wide range of fields to study archives, including public history, museum studies, Indigenous studies, gender studies, and African American history. Concentrating specifically on the latter, our second focus will center around a hands-on archival project in partnership with Rondo Avenue, Inc. (RAI). The Rondo neighborhood in St. Paul is a historically Black neighborhood that was intentionally bifurcated by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s to create a diaspora of the community there. We will read old newspapers produce by and for the neighborhood (preserved on microfilm) and mine them for old business advertisements. We will then plot the businesses on a map and generate timelines of businesses for each address. In addition to producing this map for RAI, students are required to produce a final research paper examining the economic trends of the Rondo neighborhood.

POLI 204-01

Urban Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: American urban politics, emphasizing urban policy problems, planning and decision-making . Politcal Science 100 recommened.

Fall 2017

AMST 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01; no first year students allowed* This course is built at the crossroads between critical race studies and urban sociology, and draws on important strains within cultural studies, WGSS, and critical/postmodern geography. We will investigate our own personal cognitive maps and social locations, including our complicity in dominant spatial and racial logics. Lectures, assignments, and activities encourage an understanding of the creation and on-going production of space and scale, and develop insight into racialized communities and identities as sites of conflict, struggle, and potential solidarity rather than fixed categories of representation or consumption. A segment of the course will focus on St. Paul and the impact of the Vietnam War, looking particularly at the construction of Hmong and other Southeast Asian American communities and identities. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies.

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


ENGL 341-01

20th Century British Novel: The British Multicultural Novel

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Amy Elkins

Notes: In Britain, multiculturalism has a long and dynamic history. Recent social and political developments (most notably, Brexit) have thrust narratives of nationhood, belonging, hybridity, and multiculturalism back into the limelight. These stories reveal the striking complexity of cultural hybridity in Britain, and they revel in the interconnected experiences of language, nationhood, sexuality, gender, class, and family that form modern British experience. Beginning with the mid-twentieth century, we will trace literary incarnations of British multiculturalism in the literary texts of authors such as Andrea Levy, Julian Barnes, Caryl Phillips, Ali Smith, Zadie Smith and Kazuo Ishiguro. Through engagement with cultural theorists such as Stuart Hall, Eve Sedgwick, and Mikhal Bakhtin, we will also work to understand how each text is involved in reshaping the form of the novel itself.

GEOG 241-01

Urban Geography

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course seeks to explain the evolving pattern of cities across the earth in terms of the distribution and movement of resources and people. In addition, a careful analysis of the development and internal spatial structure of North American cities will be carried out. Much class time will be spent on discussion of contemporary urban problems such as segregation, unequal investment, and control of public space as well as attempts at their solution. We make extensive use of the Twin Cities as a case study. Field work required. (4 credits)

GEOG 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 250-01; no first year student allowed* This course is built at the crossroads between critical race studies and urban sociology, and draws on important strains within cultural studies, WGSS, and critical/postmodern geography. We will investigate our own personal cognitive maps and social locations, including our complicity in dominant spatial and racial logics. Lectures, assignments, and activities encourage an understanding of the creation and on-going production of space and scale, and develop insight into racialized communities and identities as sites of conflict, struggle, and potential solidarity rather than fixed categories of representation or consumption. A segment of the course will focus on St. Paul and the impact of the Vietnam War, looking particularly at the construction of Hmong and other Southeast Asian American communities and identities. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies.

GEOG 261-01

Geography of World Urbanization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First day attendance required*

We now live in a world where the majority of the population already lives in cities. And yet every year, hundreds of millions of people continue to move into cities to pursue a better future. The contemporary social, economic, and political changes are intrinsically linked to divergent urban processes across the world. This paramount shift poses important theoretical and empirical questions to our age. This course uses the critical perspective of “global urbanism” to both contextualize and connect different urban experiences across places. We will introduce various urban settings and demonstrate how complex relations between urbanization, globalization, and economic development produce spatial unevenness and social inequality. We will study the dominant paradigm of world and global cities, which prioritizes development trajectories of cities in the global North, and discuss contesting views focusing on “ordinary cities” from the global South. Drawing on case studies in the developed and less-developed world, we will also learn how to apply the relational comparative urbanism approach as well as regionally based theoretical perspectives to comprehend the diverse urban landscapes around the globe. (4 credits)


GEOG 261-02

Geography of World Urbanization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* We now live in a world where the majority of the population already lives in cities. And yet every year, hundreds of millions of people continue to move into cities to pursue a better future. The contemporary social, economic, and political changes are intrinsically linked to divergent urban processes across the world. This paramount shift poses important theoretical and empirical questions to our age. This course uses the critical perspective of “global urbanism” to both contextualize and connect different urban experiences across places. We will introduce various urban settings and demonstrate how complex relations between urbanization, globalization, and economic development produce spatial unevenness and social inequality. We will study the dominant paradigm of world and global cities, which prioritizes development trajectories of cities in the global North, and discuss contesting views focusing on “ordinary cities” from the global South. Drawing on case studies in the developed and less-developed world, we will also learn how to apply the relational comparative urbanism approach as well as regionally based theoretical perspectives to comprehend the diverse urban landscapes around the globe.

Class meets MWF 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm in Carnegie 105

Writing designation: WA anticipated

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


GEOG 262-01

Metro Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course discusses the foundations of American urban life and metropolitan development today, and examines how and why urban housing markets operate as they do within American metropolitan regions. Topics covered in the course include: the metropolitan economy, land use patterns, urban housing supply and demand, the geography of urban housing markets, suburbanization, transportation, and public policy debates. By the end of the course, students will have mastered some of the methods used to describe metropolitan organization and change, and be able to analyze how changes in the economy and society relate to metropolitan land use. Fall semester. (4 credits)

GEOG 377-01

Qualitative Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required* Social scientists use qualitative methods to understand the ways in which societal associations operate and how people experience, contribute to, or try to change these associations. Qualitative methods are thus concerned with analyzing processes and experiences. This course trains students to use qualitative research methods to collect data, analyze it, draw authoritative conclusions, and observe professional research ethics. The course emphasizes how qualitative methods contribute to scientific research and how ethical treatment of research participants affects the practice of qualitative research. Above all, the course focuses on training students to conduct qualitative research that contributes to our understanding of human geographies. Students will develop these skills by engaging in a semester-long research project for a client. Participation in this project will help you learn how to plan, prepare, and carry out a qualitative research project on a deadline. In 2017, we will be working with the Union Park District Council in St. Paul, helping to support an ongoing cultural asset mapping project by working with residents on their community place-making efforts.

POLI 203-01

Politics and Inequality: American Welfare State

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 203-01*

Americans, at least since the Founding era, have cherished the ideal of political equality. Unlike European nations, the United States did not inherit economic class distinctions from a feudal past. But time and again, American social reformers and mass movements have highlighted inconsistencies between the value of equality and the actual practice of democracy. Through the extension of rights to citizens who were previously excluded or treated as second-class citizens, such as women and African Americans, the polity has become more inclusive. But over the last three decades American citizens have grown increasingly unequal in terms of income and wealth. The central question posed by this course is the implications of such vast economic inequality for American democracy. Do these disparities between citizens curtail, limit, and perhaps threaten the functioning of genuinely representative governance? In this course will 1) Explore what other social scientists, mostly economists and sociologists, know about contemporary inequality, particularly in terms of its causes, manifestation, and socio-economic effects; 2) Consider the concept of inequality in political theory and in American political thought, and; 3) Examine the current relationship between economic inequality and each of three major aspects of the American political system: political voice, representation, and public policy. Cross-listed as American Studies 203. (4 Credits)


Spring 2018

AMST 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. Cross-listed with Geography 341. (4 credits)

GEOG 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. (4 credits)


Courses at ACTC Institutions

Students may use courses taken at other ACTC institutions towards an urban studies concentration at Macalester. The following is a list of courses that may qualify. Students must seek approval from the concentration director to determine how a course will satisfy the concentration’s requirements.

Augsburg College

  • Art 249/349 HIS 249/349 The Designed Environment
  • Economics 110 Economics of Urban Issues
  • History 225 History of the Twin Cities
  • History 316 U.S. Urban Environmental History
  • History 335 American Urban History
  • Political Science 122 Metropolitan Complex
  • Political Science 140 Social Justice in America
  • Sociology 111 Community and the Modern Metropolis
  • Sociology 381 The City and Metro-Urban Plannin

College of St. Catherine

  • Political Science 2020 State, local and urban government
  • Sociology 3860 Urban Social Problem

Hamline University

  • Political Science 3690: Politics of Urban and Metropolitan America
  • Political Science 3700: Public Administration and Public Policy
  • Sociology 3440: Urban Sociology

University of St. Thomas

  • Geography 430: Urban Geography
  • Economics 333: Regional and Urban Economics
  • History 377: History of the Twin Cities
  • Political Science: Urban and Metropolis Politics and Government
  • Sociology: Urban Sociology