Schedule PDF

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 

9:45 – 11:00 A.M. STUDENT-LED WORKSHOP, THURSDAY

    • SUSTAINABILITY IN THE ANCIENT CITY

    • Students: Kelsey Coia ’16, Ben Shields ’17
    • Panelist:  Gaby Mazor – Beit Shean, Israel Antiquities Authority
    • Location: Davis Court, Markim Hall
    • Abstract: While sustainability is a contemporary concern, it is not new to the urban experience. The ancients though carefully and deliberately about how to balance concerns about technology, nature, climate, and environment in building cities that would stand the test of time. In the Hippocratic philosophical and medical tradition, for instance, “city life” had to be balanced with time in nature, in “the country,” – thusly the Latin notion of Otium, and time listening the rhythms and gods of the natural world. We will explore the perspectives and knowledge that animated urban sustainability in the ancient Roman world through a conversation with archaeologists in Israel who are working to understand the ‘sustainable’ concepts laden in Roman paganism and how it shaped urban development over two thousand years ago. 

11:15 – 1:00 P.M. PLENARY SPEAKER, THURSDAY

    • Barriers to Bridges: Building Resilience in the face of an Uncertain Climate Future

    • Speaker: Sarah Dooling
    • Location: John B. Davis Lecture Hall, Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center
    • Abstract: Globally, urban habitats are rapidly changing, driven by human actions that are altering atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide in large part through the production of unprecedented levels of greenhouse gas emissions. Many researchers and policymakers present climate change as a scientific story to tell that reduces cultural and racial diversity, social complexities and the historical legacies of urban development to homogenous categories. In response, urban ecologists suggest that climate change cannot be divorced from the social aspects of human lives. The grand project facing humanity is now less about understanding the science of climate change, and more about developing strategies based on narratives that acknowledge the contribution of historical legacies of urban development and social inequities to the production of neighborhood and city socio-ecological vulnerabilities. 

      Dooling’s talk focuses on strategies for creating resilient urban habitats for people and biota in the context of environmental uncertainties, racial and economic inequities, and uneven development histories. These strategies were developed for a predominantly African American neighborhood in Austin, TX experiencing gentrification, flood risk, heat stress and an active school-to-prison pipeline. The five strategies work together to reconfigure institutional, economic, government and environmental vulnerabilities into new relationships and power dynamics in life-affirming ways. This talk concludes with an expanded idea of what constitutes climate change and resilience, discussing how both are inseparable from environmental and social justice efforts.

1:30 – 2:45 P.M. STUDENT-LED WORKSHOPS, THURSDAY

    • BUILDING COMMUNITY WEALTH AND POWER WITH REINVESTMENT

    • Students: Sophia Downey ’18, Giulia Girgenti ’18, Rebecca Krasky ’19
    • Panelists: Nicole Ektnitphong – Climate Generation, Voices for Racial Justice;
      Jason Rodney ’10 – Resource Generation, USA Cooperative Youth Council, Aynah
      Patty O’Keefe – MN350;  Chris Wells – Macalester College
    • Location: Weyerhaeuser Boardroom
    • Abstract: This workshop introduces the concept of reinvestment, a strategy that connects fossil fuel divestment with efforts to create community wealth through regenerative finance. Divestment aims to end the extraction of resources from people and the environment by removing institutional investments in fossil fuel companies, and reinvestment aims to reinvest those resources in communities. We will be focusing on the broader conceptual frameworks of community wealth building, with less attention to the investment practices that make it happen. The discussion will center on the Just Transition Model, which is an alternative economic system that transitions away from extraction, exploitation and objectification and moves toward a more just and sustainable system in which wealth generated by the community stays with the community. Our panelists all work within the Twin Cities with organizations working towards this Just Transition in reinvestment, racial justice, and cooperative finance.
    • UBER EVERYWHERE

    • Students: Nina Escriva Fernandez ’17
    • Panelists: Samantha Luce – Harvard ’16; Marlon Batres y Carr – Uber driver;
      Harry Campbell – the Rideshare Guy
    • Location: Davis Court, Markim Hall
    • Abstract: Ever since Uber’s launch as a start-up in 2009, the company has drastically changed the world of transportation on a global scale. Available in almost 500 cities around the world, not only does Uber offer improved access to transportation for its passengers where systems already in place are lacking, but provides numerous opportunities for drivers as well. This panel brings in different parties involved in the company, and assesses both the positive aspects and the critiques of the “uberification” of transportation.

3:00 – 4:15 P.M. STUDENT-LED WORKSHOPS, THURSDAY

    • REFUGEES AND URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

    • Students: Muath Ibaid ’17, Bo-Sung Kim ’17, Farah AlHaddad ’17
    • Location: Davis Court, Markim Hall
    • Abstract: As the global population of refugees soars to 21.3 million, refugee camps have become urban centers. Yet, there are crucial differences between refugee camps and mainstream cities. As temporary settlements, refugee camps face ongoing conflict and counteracting support from governments and aid organizations. The social, economic and environmental aspects of such ‘urbanized’ refugee camps question their prolonged existence and projected sustainability. This workshop focuses on the experience of two refugee camps, Yarmouk, Syria and Dadaab, Kenya, to explore the complexity of these new urbanized zones. It then shifts to a more local application: the refugee population in Minnesota – a top destination in the U.S for refugees. 
    • Sustainability in St. Paul’s MLS Stadium

    • Students: Nate Merrill ’18, Spencer Nelson ’17
    • Panelists: Tom Fischer – University of Minnesota College of Design; Eric Molho – Citizens Advisory Committee; Jonathan Sage-Martinson – City of St. Paul
    • Location: Weyerhaeuser Boardroom
    • Abstract: It has become common practice among large cities to build sports stadia as an economic development tool for both the city and a local community. This view is not without controversy, as concerns over environmental impacts and gentrification often arise, and the proposed and impending Major League Soccer Stadium in St. Paul’s Midway area is no exception. The future MLS stadium and redevelopment at the Midway site in Saint Paul has led to both optimism and consternation among community groups across the city. Using perspectives drawn from the communities affected, this panel contributes to and fosters discussion of the economic and environmental sustainability of St. Paul’s MLS stadium, and urban sports stadiums in general.
  • 4:45 – 6:15 P.M. PLENARY SPEAKER, THURSDAY

    • JUST SUSTAINABILITIES: RE-IMAGINING E/QUALITY, LIVING WITHIN LIMITS

    • Speaker: Julian Agyeman
    • Location: John B. Davis Lecture Hall, Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center 
    • Abstract: In his keynote, Julian will first outline the concept of ‘just sustainabilities.’ He will argue that integrating social needs and welfare, offers us a more ‘just,’ rounded, and equity-focused definition of sustainability and sustainable development, while not negating the very real environmental threats we face. He will define it as ‘the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, in a just and equitable manner, whilst living within the limits of supporting ecosystems.’ He will then look at examples of just sustainabilities in practice in the real world focusing on ideas about ‘fair shares’ resource distribution globally; planning for intercultural cities; achieving wellbeing and happiness; the potential in the new sharing economy and finally the concept of ‘spatial justice’ and how it complements the more established concept of social justice.
  • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 

  • 9:10 – 10:40 A.M. PLENARY SPEAKER, FRIDAY

    • Art Interventions

    • Speaker: Seitu Kenneth Jones
    • Location: John B. Davis Lecture Hall, Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center
    • Abstract: Seitu’s artwork investigates the integration of art and nature. He aspires to create environmental artwork that honors and inspires communities. His mission is to create artistic interventions on the streetscape that can be a source of community pride, and a tool for social and cultural development. Typically, Seitu’s designs are informed by and recall elements of the social and natural context of a site and its surrounding communities. He approaches his artwork as a socially based practice that is deeply engaged with people and place with the intention of effecting change.

      His presentation will focus his Frogtown studio and neighborhood and will outline how artistic interventions can “greenline” streetscapes and bring residents closer to the natural world. Greenlining is in direct contrast to “redlining”, the term used to describe how banks and insurance companies withhold services from low-income neighborhoods or communities of color. Seitu believes that creating urban green sanctuaries and embracing our natural environment will enhance and improve community health and the well being of all residents. He will briefly review the socially engaged artistic practice of other African American artists and describe his artistic interventions in the neighborhood food system and his work creating the ARTark.

  • 11:00 – 12:30 P.M. ROUNDTABLE, FRIDAY

    • OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND STRATEGIES FOR BUILDING SUSTAINABLE CITIES

    • Panelists: Chris Ward, Julian Agyemen, Sarah Dooling, Seitu Jones
    • Moderator: Roopali Phadke
    • Student: Isabella Soparkar ’17
    • Location: John B. Davis Lecture Hall, Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center
    • Abstract: We invite our keynote speakers to turn our Roundtable themes into strategies for individual and collective action. This session will begin with a student address and then turn to our distinguished guests for their responses. We then invite the audience to contribute their questions and insights about how Macalester can more fully live out our commitment to urban sustainability.
  • 2:20 – 3:20 P.M. STUDENT-LED WORKSHOPS, FRIDAY

    • URBAN AGRICULTURE IN THE TWIN CITIES

    • Students: Thao Hoang ’18, Que Nguyen ’19
    • Panelists: Claire Baglien – Gandhi Mahal Interfaith Garden & Gandhi Mahal Restaurant; Paula Westmoreland – Ecological Design; Russ Henry – Homegrown Minneapolis
    • Location: Davis Court, Markim Hall
    • Abstract: Urban agriculture is taking off all over the globe and introducing new entrepreneurship opportunities. In the Twin Cities, urban agriculture has already taken many forms, from backyard and rooftop gardens, basement aquaponics, to vacant lot farms and vertical farms.These farming efforts provide multiple ecological, economic, social, and health benefits. This panel discussion aims to inform participants about the growing local food movement as well as challenges and future opportunities for urban agriculture in our cities. These insights will be drawn from different perspectives, an urban farmer, a permaculture designer, and a community organizer.
    • Keeping Minnesota Arts Alive: In the Cities and On the Range

    • Students: Isaac Gamoran ’18, Hannah Mira Friedland ’17
    • Panelists: Scott Artley – Patrick’s Cabaret; Mary McReynolds – Lyric Center for the Arts; Beverly Cottman, interdisciplinary Twin Cities artist
    • Location: Weyerhaeuser Boardroom
    • Abstract: What happens when a modern-day performing arts organization loses its home, or undergoes a long reconstruction process to create a new home? In this workshop, we will explore performing arts organizations and communities in two places: The Twin Cities and Northern Minnesota’s Iron Range. Through discussions with panelists Scott Artley, Executive Artistic Director of Patrick’s Cabaret (formerly located in Minneapolis), Mary McReynolds, Director of the Lyric Center for the Arts in the Iron Range town of Virginia, MN, and Beverly Cottman, interdisciplinary artist in the Twin Cities, we hope to delve into these artistic communities’ relationship to site, role in city place-making, and sustainable financial models. With a panel discussion and small group conversations, we will challenge participants to think critically about the unique future of Minnesota artistry.
  • 3:30 – 4:30 P.M. STUDENT-LED WORKSHOPS, FRIDAY

    • GREEN CHEMISTRY: A PATHWAY TOWARDs URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

    • Students: Hoang Anh Phan ’18
    • Panelists: Paul Jackson – St. Olaf College; Ben Rabe ’09 – Fresh Energy
    • Location: Davis Court, Markim Hall
    • Abstract: Green chemistry is the design and application of chemicals that will reduce or eliminate hazardous substances. Innovations in green chemistry potentially act as catalysts in promoting and enhancing urban sustainability while improving human health. Drawing on multiple perspectives and the experiences of the panelists, this workshop delves into the core values of green chemistry, along with its vital role in energy development and urban infrastructure. This workshop also provides insights into the importance of collaboration and cooperation among scholars, chemistry experts, policy makers, and local communities in building sustainable urban areas.
    • COOPERATIVES: ALTERNATIVE ECONOMY FOR EQUITY AND EMPOWERMENT

    • Students: Euijin Kim ’19, Chelsea Valdez ’19, Ruotong Wang ’19
    • Panelists: Timothy DenHerder-Thomas – Cooperative Energy Futures;
      Tara L Tieso – Lowertown Artist’s Lofts Cooperative; Abby Rogosheske – Seward Community Co-op
    • Location: Weyerhaeuser Boardroom
    • Abstract: Cooperatives are member-controlled businesses that are founded on community and solidarity. This workshop invites panellists and other individuals to share their ideas on how cooperatives can empower people in marginalized communities. We also aim to get at the question of individual identities intersecting with cooperatives. Most importantly, we hope to grow as a group that can actively strive towards better models of urban living that support economic, social and environmental justice.
  • 5:30 – 7:00 P.M. STUDENT-LED WORKSHOP, FRIDAY

    • NIGHT A’ROUND THE TABLE

    • Students: Mira Ensley-Field ’17, Naomi Klionsky ’17, Robert Lin ’17
    • Panelists: Metric Giles – Community Stabilization Project;  Melvin Giles – CREATE: The Community Meal, Friendly Streets Initiative; Delinia Parris – NeighborWorksValentine Cadieux – Hamline University; Seitu kenneth Jones – plenary speaker
    • Location: Cultural House, 37 Macalester Street
    • Abstract: Welcome to the dinner table! Everyone is invited to share in a meal and workshop ideas about collaboration and cooperation. We practice collaboration and cooperation everywhere, in group projects, community engaged scholarship, and organizing for systemic change, whether we are acting as individuals, communities, or institutions. Together and drawing on the wisdom of our featured guests who power a network of farmer/scholar/activist/artists in Saint Paul’s Rondo and Frogtown neighborhoods, we will build a model for collaboration that everyone can take away from the table and place in their personal toolbox for building resilience and regeneration in urban communities.
  • 6:00 – 9:00 P.M., FRIDAY

    • ARTS SAMPLER AND RECEPTION

    • Location: Janet Wallace Fine Arts Center
    • Description: Join us for a festive celebration of arts and urban sustainability in the Twin Cities. We will feature the work of interactive media artists affiliated with two exciting local efforts: Public Arts Saint Paul  and Northern Lights. Projects featured will include The Water Bar, the Urban Flower Field, and the Plume Project. Wander the exhibits and mingle with friends. Light refreshments provided.
  • SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1

  • 12:30 – 1:30 P.M. PLENARY SPEAKER, SATURDAY

    • THE CHALLENGE OF GROWTH   

    • Speaker: Chris Ward
    • Location: Weyerhaeuser Memorial Chapel
    • Abstract: With the ever increasing urbanization of the world, policy planners must determine what kind of cities we want to live in and what kind of barriers exist to reaching that goal. While the structural challenges of urban life have have largely remained constant, external and internal pressures have made answering these questions far more pressing and difficult. Theses structural challenges include: the environment, historically a matter of drinking water and waste; mobility, getting to and from work; and, housing, meeting the needs of all income levels. Radical income inequality, climate change, technological innovation, and constrained economic returns and reduced growth, are all forcing a far more complex series of answers than probably ever before. Building on the multifaceted challenges of my work in New York City, I will discuss responses to those emerging issues, providing some lessons learned from large scale project development in the five boroughs. I will seek to share some urban planning framework and guidelines for cities around the country and the world.
  • 2:00 – 5:00 P.M. FIELD TRIPs, SATURDAY

    • 1. THE STADIUM AS A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

    • Location: Downtown St. Paul or Minneapolis
    • Faculty Guide: Dan Trudeau Student Coordinator: Chris Pieper
    • Abstract: This field trip explores the ways in which publicly-financed sports stadia contribute to broader efforts to make cities more sustainable. Visits to CHS field and Xcel Energy Center, both in downtown St. Paul, afford an opportunity to examine recently built and renovated stadia. With the help of local experts, we will learn about cutting-edge strategies and technology to decrease the environmental footprint of these large structures. At the same time, we will also explore the ways in which stadia present opportunities to advance broader efforts aiming to promote systemic change in transportation, land use, water management, and other domains that affect the urban environment. Finally, we will also consider the controversial aspects of public support and resistance to sports stadia, which may also detract from the social sustainability of such projects.
    • REGISTRATION REQUIRED

    • 2. INNOVATION, PRESERVATION, AND art ALONG CULTURAL CORRIDORS

    • Location: St. Paul: University Avenue, Selby Avenue; Minneapolis: Broadway Avenue, Central Avenue
    • Faculty Guide: Paul Shadewald Student Coordinator: Toan Doan
    • Abstract: This field trip will explore several cultural corridors in the Twin Cities with a focus on how communities are preserving their cultural and community assets while guiding innovation and sustainable development. We shall explore are the emerging innovation district along University Avenue, the historic Rondo Community of St. Paul, and the cultural development models of Juxtaposition Arts in North Minneapolis and the Northeast Arts District. There will be time to get out of the bus at various locations to engage on foot.
    • REGISTRATION REQUIRED
    • 4. FACING THE RIVER: EXPLORING THE MILL CITY  (*FULL)

    • Location: Guthrie Theater/Mill City Museum area
    • Faculty Guide: Chris Wells Student Coordinator: Gordon Moore
    • Abstract: Join us for a walking tour of the industrial waterfront of Minneapolis, ranging from what was once the world’s largest flour mill to the Stone Arch Bridge. In the second half of the 19th century, millers capitalized on the power of St. Anthony Falls to transform a remote outpost on the edges of the expanding American market economy into the leading industrial city of the old Northwest. In doing so, they set the stage not only for the city’s urban future, but also established many of the key relationships that continue to shape the city’s sustainability, now and into the future.
    • 5. URBANWILD: SAINT PAUL’S NEWEST PARKS AND PLACES  (*FULL)

    • Location: Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, Prairie Payne Pocket Park and Frogtown Farm 
    • Faculty Guide:   Roopali Phadke Student Coordinator: Maya Swope
    • Abstract: The Twin Cities are recognized nationally for our great park systems and premier bike culture. Yet, a new vision for the urban wild is emerging that blends recreation, food justice and the arts. On this field trip, we will visit some of Saint Paul’s newest parks: Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, Prairie Payne Pocket Park and Frogtown Farm. We will meet with the local leaders whose vision for combining public art, social justice, and environmental sustainability is giving rise to a new kind of urban wilderness.