The First-Year Course

A seminar for first-year students

In your first semester, you must take a First-Year Course. There are many options for you to choose from, on a wide-variety of topics, representing diverse disciplinary perspectives. Some students choose this course based on the topic; others because they want to explore a department in which they might major or minor. Either approach is fine. Because this is only one course out of four, and it only lasts one semester, there are plenty of opportunities throughout the first year to explore majors or interest areas beyond the First-Year Course.

Some First-Year Courses are designated as residential courses. Students who enroll in one of these courses live near one another in the same residence hall, usually on the same floor. This facilitates discussion and group work outside of the classroom. Many courses also utilize student writing preceptors to provide additional writing support and peer mentoring.

Abbreviations Key

  • R = students in the class will live near each other on the same floor and may be roommates
  • TR = Tuesday, Thursday; MWF = Monday, Wednesday, Friday
  • WA = Argumentative Writing, WC = Writing as Craft, WP = Writing as Practice

First-Year Course Offerings for Fall 2018

Department Instructor Course Name Writing Designation Residential
Anthropology Ron Barrett ANTH 194-01:  The Anthropology of Medicine: An Introduction to the Discipline WA R
Anthropology Arjun Guneratne ANTH 194-02:  Human Foodways: An Introduction to Anthropology
WA R
Art & Art History Stan Sears ART 235-01:  Sculpture I: Basic Sculpture with a Dose of Hot Metal None R
Asian Languages and Cultures Arthur Mitchell ASIA 254-01/JAPA 254-01:  Japanese Film and Animation:  From the Salaryman to the Shōjo WA R
Biology Lin Aanonsen BIOL 118-01:  Heart and Soul of Biology WA R
Biology Devavani Chatterjea BIOL 194-01/ENVI 194-02:  Health in the Anthropocene WA R
The Classical Mediterranean and Middle East Beth Severy-Hoven CLAS 194-01:  Sex, Satire and Slavery: Life and Literature in the Roman Empire WA
Computer Science Susan Fox COMP 123-01:  Core Concepts in Computer Science: Turtles, Text, Images,and the Social Good None R
Economics Felix Friedt ECON 119-01:  Principles of Economics None R
Economics Liang Ding ECON 194-01:  Calculus-Based Principles of Economics None
English Matt Burgess ENGL 150-01:  Introduction to Creative Writing WC
English Amy Elkins ENGL 137-01:  Novel:  On Beauty WA R
Environmental Studies Louisa Bradtmiller ENVI 294-01:  Oceanography WA R
French and Francophone Studies Andrew Billing FREN 194-02:  From ‘68 to (17)89 and Back: May 1968 and the French Revolutionary Legacy WA
Geography Laura Smith GEOG 242-01:  Regional Geography of the U.S. and Canada WA R
Geography Bill Moseley GEOG 243-01:  Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context WA R
Geology Kristi Curry Rogers GEOL 194-01:  Flying Dinosaurs and Walking Whales WA R
Geology Karl Wirth GEOL 160-01/ENVI 160-01 and GEOL 160-L1/ENVI 160-L1:  Dynamic Earth and Global Change WA R
German and Russian Studies Linda Schulte-Sasse GERM 255-01:  German Cinema Studies: Art/Horror WA R
History Linda Sturtz HIST 137-02:  From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War WA
History Karin Velez HIST 294-01:  First Encounters in History WA
International Studies David Chioni Moore INTL 111-01:  Introduction to International Studies:  Literature and Global Culture WA R
Linguistics Christina Esposito LING 194-01:  Being Human:  An Introduction to Language WA R
Media and Cultural Studies Morgan Adamson MCST 128-02:  Film Analysis/VIsual Culture WA
Media and Cultural Studies Leola Johnson MCST 194-01 Critical Studies of Sports in the Media WA
Music Mark Mandarano MUSI 194-01:  33 1/3 WA
Philosophy Joy Laine PHIL 100-01:  Introduction to (World) Philosophy WA R
Philosophy Diane Michelfelder PHIL 121-01:  Ethics:  Happiness and Philosophical Inquiry WA
Physics and Astronomy Tonnis ter Veldhuis PHYS 194-01:  Rocket Science WA R
Physics and Astronomy John Cannon PHYS 194-02:  The Cosmos WA R
Political Science Andrew Latham POLI 223-01:  The Politics of the World Wars WA R
Political Science Patrick Schmidt POLI 294-02:  The Politics of Architecture and the Built Environment WA
Psychology Brooke Lea PSYC 194-01:  How We Remember, Learn, and Decide:  Applied Cognitive Science
Religious Studies William Hart RELI 252-02/AMST 294-02:  Martin and Malcolm: Racial Terror and the Black Freedom Struggle Today WA R
Religious Studies Erik Davis RELI 311-02:  Ritual WP
Sociology Erik Larson SOCI 190-01:  Criminal Behavior/Social Control WA
Spanish and Portuguese Ernesto Ortiz-Diaz SPAN 305-01:  Brothers from Another Mother: Exploring Latin America’s Giants, Brazil & Mexico (Intro to Hispanic Studies: Brazil and Mexico) WA R
Theatre and Dance Wynn Fricke THDA 105-01:  Seeing Performance in the Twin Cities WA
Theatre and Dance Claudia Tatinge Nascimento THDA 105-02:  Seeing Performance in the Twin Cities WA

Course Descriptions

ANTH 194-01: The Anthropology of Medicine: An Introduction to the Discipline  (R)
Ron Barrett, Anthropology Department

This course introduces the anthropological study of health, illness, and healing from evolutionary, cross-cultural, and epidemiological perspectives.  From an evolutionary perspective, we will consider the changing relationships between human societies and human diseases ranging from Paleolithic parasites to the emerging and re-emerging diseases of the present day. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing traditions from around the world.  Finally, from the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases.  This course is taught by a former registered nurse with dual training in human biology and cultural anthropology. The course counts as an introduction to anthropology for students wishing to take other courses in the department. However, students who take this course may not take ANTH 239, Medical Anthropology, because of significant overlap between these two courses.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Carnegie 06B

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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ANTH 194-02: Human Foodways: An Introduction to Anthropology  (R)
Arjun Guneratne, Anthropology Department

For human beings, food is much more than nutrition; food is a way that people communicate. What we eat, how we eat, where and with whom we eat transmits messages about status, identity, gender, power and a host of other matters that shape our place and role in society and the ways in which we understand ourselves and others. Human foodways are thus an important window into understanding what makes us human and how human cultures operate. Through an examination of human foodways across time and space, from the origins of Homo sapiens to the present, this course offers an introduction to anthropology, the discipline that specializes in the study of human beings in their biological and cultural complexity. Students will write a 10-page paper based on original field work; in addition, students must cook a culturally unfamiliar dish and write a commentary on it that places it in its cultural context.  The course counts as an introduction to anthropology for students wishing to continue in the field; students who take this course may not take ANTH 369, Food and Culture, because of significant overlap between the two courses.

Class meets MWF 10:50 am – 11:50 am in Carnegie 105

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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ART 235-01:  Sculpture I: Basic Sculpture With a Dose of Hot Metal  (R)
Stan Sears, Art & Art History Department

We start with an exploration of the tools and processes available in the sculpture studio, including woodworking tools for both carving and fabrication.  Sculpture I introduces students to cast metal work in our foundry, where we will learn a lost wax ceramic shell casting system. The range of form which can be explored is infinite and starts with a wax form which is eventually replaced with the 2100 degree bronze.

Like my other course offerings, Sculpture I will include an off-site project that includes a class trip to my farm/studio in western Wisconsin.  At the farm we will install a series of wind powered kinetic sculptures which is your first project. There is also a flock of sheep to visit as well as great food.

Class meets TR 8:00 am – 11:10 am in Art 118

Writing designation: None

Living arrangements:  Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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ASIA 254-01/JAPA 254-01: Japanese Film and Animation: From the Salaryman to the Shōjo  (R)
Arthur Mitchell, Asian Languages and Cultures Department

This course examines Japanese film from the classics of Japanese cinema (Kurosawa Akira’s Ikiru, Mizoguchi Kenji’s Osaka Elegy) to the transnational genre of anime (Miyazaki Hayao’s Spirited Away and Anno Hideaki’s Evangelion) by tracing the archetypes of the white-collar worker and the adolescent girl. The course will be centered on weekly screenings, and class meetings will be focused on developing skills of film analysis. You will learn how to identify and analyze the structures and strategies that produce the narrative effects of the films we watch and learn how to develop arguments about how they engage society. You will also work on cultivating your critical voice and use writing as a means of developing your critical skills.

Class meets MWF 1:10 pm – 2:10 pm in Neill 110

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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BIOL 118-01: The Heart and Soul of Biology  (R)
Lin Aanonsen, Biology Department

All of us encounter stress in many ways and often, more stress than is healthy for our mind and body.  In this course, we will explore the biological basis of stress, its causes, and different approaches to reducing stress.  Fundamental principles of cell biology and physiology will be covered in this course primarily through study of the endocrine and nervous system, especially as they relate to our understanding of stress.  As well as studying the biology underlying stress and its effects on the body, we will be simultaneously learning and practicing meditation and other mindfulness-based approaches in order to better handle stress.  Why do I call this course “The Heart and Soul of Biology”? My desire to study biology is sparked by the wonder and beauty that permeates all living beings, and that “wonder and beauty” is inextricably linked to my search for meaning and what may be beyond our “normal” comprehension.  In this course, we will attempt to not only discuss and explore life through the study of biology, but also explore how science and spirituality can be seamlessly entwined. This is a course about body, mind, and spirit, thus, we will be reading a variety of papers and articles on topics arranging from the role of meditation and sleep on the function of the brain/body to the intersections between science and religion/spirituality. This is a writing intensive course that does not require a strong science background, and is appropriate for students interested in pursuing either science or non-science majors. It is especially intended for students who are interested in gaining a deeper understanding of biology and also willing to discuss the bridge between science and spirituality and belief.

This is a residential course and has been approved as a WA course.

Class meets TR 9:40 am – 11:10 am in Olin-Rice 205

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements:  Single gender rooms, single gender floor

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BIOL 194-01/ENVI 194-02: Health in the Anthropocene  (R)
Devavani Chatterjea, Biology Department

By many measures, the human population is healthier – life expectancies higher, and childhood mortality lower – than ever before.  But gains in human achievements in health and beyond have come at the cost of an unprecedented exploitation of planetary resources. Energy extraction and use, agricultural and industrial production and massive transactions of goods and services have literally reshaped and transformed the air, waters and soils that sustain life and health on earth on local and planetary scales. A damaged planet damages human health. In this first-year course, we will explore the changing health of populations in a fraying world through historic and contemporary lenses of human-environment interactions using tools from biology, epidemiology, ecosystem health and public health to dissect patterns of old and emerging infectious and chronic diseases in human and non-human species.  We will read research articles, news stories and memoirs, use analytic and expressive modes of inquiry including reflective and expository writing, art, theater and movement to explore these issues and create roadmaps for empowered, hopeful actions toward a healthy future for ourselves and our planet.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Olin-Rice 205

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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CLAS 194-01: Sex, Satire and Slavery: Life and Literature in the Roman Empire
Beth Severy-Hoven, The Classical Mediterranean and Middle East Department

How can we use literature to help us understand life in an ancient world? Novels, poetry and satire provide a window into the Roman Empire — a window tantalizing for its details, humor, foreignness and familiarity, as well as clouded by its elite and male biases. Together we will explore a variety of Roman literary texts and how scholars have used them to reconstruct everyday life. We’ll supplement these studies with remains of material culture as we delve into topics such as the family, sexuality, slavery, and dining. We will read a lot of ancient literature and modern scholarship, and class will be based primarily on discussion. This course also carries a WA designation, so we will devote time to the study and practice of crafting and supporting an academic argument in writing.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Old Main 002

Writing designation: WA

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COMP 123: Core Concepts in Computer Science: Turtles, Text, Images, and the Social Good  (R)
Susan Fox, Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science Department

At its core, Computer Science is about information and process. Information becomes data that a computer can manipulate; a process describes in a standard way the steps to solve a given problem. The computer and the Internet have transformed our lives by allowing us to store and manipulate data in unprecedented ways, and by automating incredibly complex processes. Computer science is also fundamentally about the interplay of design, creativity, technique, and experimentation. Creating complex systems or ways to represent complex data requires us to plan carefully (design), and to know how to use the computer’s tools (technique), but we also experience inspiration and build something beautiful out of our imaginations (creativity), and often we just have to get our hands dirty trying things out (experimentation). This course will introduce you to computer science, including central concepts of the field such as design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, and the representation of information within the computer. Our exploration of these central ideas will be organized around several major topics, including turtle graphics, text and data analysis, image processing, and graphical user interfaces. Throughout, we will apply our techniques to simulations, data analysis, and visualizations that explore topics that make our world a better place. We will use the popular Python programming language.

This course is suitable for students who are considering a major in computer science, and also for students who are just interested in learning about computer science to support other interests. There are no prerequisites for this course; no background in computing or programming is required.

Class meets MWF 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm in Olin-Rice 258

Writing designation: none

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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ECON 119-01: Principles of Economics  (R)
Felix Friedt, Economics Department

This course is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics and macroeconomics. The course begins with an introduction to supply and demand and the basic forces that determine an equilibrium in a market economy. We then turn our attention to firms and their decisions about optimal production, and the impact of different market structures on firms’ behavior. The last part of Microeconomics introduces a framework for learning about consumer behavior and analyzing consumer decisions. The second part of the class is Macroeconomics. It includes the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed. Important policy debates such as, the sub-prime crisis, social security, the public debt, and international economic issues are critically explored. The first objective of this class is to introduce students to a wide range of economic theories and to help students understand how markets work to allocate goods, resources and income in society. The second objective is to provide students the proper scientific methods and tools to discuss economic issues, solve economic problems and make good policy decisions. This course also aims to provide economic majors the appropriate background and foundation for future coursework in the economics major.

Class meets MWF 1:10 pm – 2:10pm in Carnegie 304

Writing designation: none

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, single gender floor

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ECON 194-01: Calculus-based Principles of Economics
Liang Ding, Economics Department

This course is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics and macroeconomics in a math intensive way. Compared to Econ 119 Principles of Economics, this class requires calculus to learn economic models and conduct economic analysis, although the two classes cover the same economic concepts and theories.

This course begins with an introduction to supply and demand and the basic forces that determine an equilibrium in a market economy. We then turn our attention to firms and their decisions about optimal production, and the impact of different market structures on firms’ behavior. The last part of Microeconomics introduces a framework for learning about consumer behavior and analyzing consumer decisions.

The second part of the class is Macroeconomics. It includes the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed. Important policy debates such as, the sub-prime crisis, social security, the public debt, and international economic issues are critically explored.

The first objective of this class is to introduce students to a wide range of economic theories and to help students understand how markets work to allocate goods, resources and income in society. The second objective is to provide student proper scientific methods and tools to discuss economic issues, solve economic problems and make good policy decisions. This course also aims to provide economic majors the appropriate background and foundation for future coursework in the economics major.

Class meets MWF 10:50 am – 11:50 am in Carnegie 305

Writing designation:  None

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ENGL 137-01: Novel: On Beauty  (R)
Amy Elkins, English Department

This first year course explores the concept of beauty in its many forms, from feelings associated with beautiful places and people to the history of visual attraction and attention.  Reading novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present, we will learn to see beauty from different perspectives and to ask how the visible world intersects with larger social issues.  For example, can the beautiful be political? How are shifting gender norms redefining beauty in today’s world? What is the relationship between art and narcissism? How do writers use beauty as a tool of critique, celebration, unity, etc.? Can there be beauty in trauma?  The novels we will study critique and analyze these issues even as they revel in the complexity of beauty across time, space, artistic forms, media, and cultures.

Students will read literary works by Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, and Zadie Smith, among others.  In addition to lively in-class discussions and multimedia analysis, students will conduct work in Macalester’s IdeaLab and focus on becoming stronger academic writers.

Class meets MWF 1:10 pm – 2:10 pm in Neill 111

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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ENGL 150-01: Introduction to Creative Writing
Matt Burgess, English Department

This first-year course will focus on the basic elements of creative writing. You will be asked to read and discuss work by major writers, to critique each other’s work, and to write multiple drafts of original works of short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Throughout the semester our focus will be on helping you to discover and nurture your creative voice, and then express that voice with force and conviction. Authors under consideration will include the Grimm Brothers, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bishop, James Baldwin, and Alison Bechdel. All literary genres—sonnets, slam poems, personal essays, narrative podcasts, kitchen sink realism, and intergalactic space operas—are welcome here. Also, please know that this course must be completed at Macalester as a prerequisite for the further study of creative writing in the English Department.

Class meets MWF 9:40 am – 10:40 am in Main 011

Writing designation: WC

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ENVI 294-01: Oceanography  (R)
Louisa Bradtmiller, Environmental Studies Department

The study of oceanography is a multidisciplinary pursuit that applies tools from geology, physics, chemistry, and biology to better understand one of Earth’s most unique planetary features. Oceans cover the majority of Earth’s surface and were the birthplace of nearly all complex life on Earth. Ocean currents carry heat, nutrients, and carbon around the globe, influencing Earth’s climate from global to local scales. However, despite its immense size, the ocean system is also highly sensitive to human impacts such as acidification, overfishing, and pollution. This course will provide an overview of the ocean’s physical, chemical, and biological properties and processes and the complex ways in which they interact. We will use oceanographic data to ask and answer questions about modern oceanographic systems. We will also explore human impacts on the oceans in their scientific and socio-political contexts. We will read scientific as well as non-technical writing about the ocean, and write our own oceanographic “stories” in a variety of forms. This course is designed for students with an introductory background in any related discipline, and enthusiasm for approaching science in a multidisciplinary way.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Olin-Rice 170

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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FREN 194-02:  From ’68 to (17)89 and Back: May 1968 and the French Revolutionary Legacy
Andrew Billing, French and Francophone Studies Department

2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the events of May 1968, one of the most significant and controversial periods in post-war France. For several weeks, left-wing students and workers demonstrated in the streets of Paris, occupied French universities and other public buildings, and initiated general strikes in protest against the perceived authoritarianism of the French political system and the inequalities of French capitalism. Students and workers demanded a radical political, social, and economic transformation of French society, and for a moment the French political order looked as if it might crumble.

May 1968 ended with conservative president Charles de Gaulle and the French right’s reassertion of political authority. Yet the intellectual ferment of the 1968 generation – the soixante-huitards – elicited profound changes in French society, from public life, to the university and workplace, and to the home, and for relations between political leaders and citizens, citizens and immigrants, and men and women, among other groups. As such, May 1968 can be viewed less as a failed revolt or revolution than as a cultural and social turning point and touchstone.

In this course, in a year in which academics and intellectuals are actively reassessing its legacy, we will explore the causes, ideas, and importance of May 1968 in light of the French Revolution of 1789. Our focus will not be on history per se, but on the political, social, and economic ideas and values at stake in these periods. The Revolution is often understood as the defining event in modern French history. In its assault on the old order of the ancien régime, the Revolution asserted the primacy of new emancipatory ideals of liberty, equality, fraternity, and secularism. Although these ideals were meant to provide the foundation for a new and reformed social order, their hegemony, meaning and even their legitimacy remained contested and uncertain, a factor contributing to French political instability during the nineteenth century and through to 1968.

Our question, then, will be: to what extent was May 1968 a continuation of and attempt to complete the Revolution of 1789 and its inspirations, ideals, and energies? What did May 1968 owe to the ideas and principles of radical eighteenth-century figures such Rousseau, Sièyes, Robespierre, Olympe de Gouges, Madame de Staël, and Babeuf? Where, and why, did thinkers linked to 1968 (Debord; Godard; Foucault; Cixous; Herrmann) break with the ideas and commitments of the Revolution? And what lessons might we draw from the successes and failures of 1789 and 1968 as we examine the question of revolution today?

The class will be taught mainly in seminar/discussion format with some short lectures, and some debates and historical simulations. Coursework will include a series of short papers, oral presentations, written exams, and one longer research paper. You will be expected to present and defend your ideas using arguments and evidence, and attempt to persuade and engage with the ideas of other students. All materials in English.

Class meets MWF 2:20 pm – 3:20 pm in Neill 400

Writing designation: WA

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GEOG 242-01  Regional Geography of the U.S. and Canada  (R)
Laura Smith, Geography Department

What is it?  Where is it? Why is it located there?  So what? Geography is much more than a collection of facts about capital cities and mountain ranges; the essence of geography is to study why locations and features matter.  Geography is the study of spatial organization of human activity, and of people’s relationships with their environment – whether in an urban or a rural setting. How have human activities and social/cultural characteristics in a place been shaped by the landscape, and in turn, how has the landscape been shaped by human activities?

In Regional Geography of the United States and Canada, we tackle timely and engaging questions such as: What characteristics give “The South” a stronger regional image than other areas of the U.S. and Canada?
Can we – or should we? – reverse the dramatic loss of population from the Great Plains region?
Can the Colorado River continue to sustain fast-growing western cities like Las Vegas and Phoenix?
What are the economic and cultural effects of language in the French Canada region?

Throughout the semester, we explore the ways in which diverse groups of people interact with the natural environment to produce the contemporary landscapes (human and physical) and regional differentiation (social and cultural) of the U.S. and Canada.  The course emphasizes patterns of human settlement, economic activity, and land use, with special attention given to social and legal issues relevant to Native populations in the U.S. and the historic and current status and development of Native lands. This course fulfills the U.S. Identities and Differences (USID) general education requirement.

This course will introduce you to a variety of concepts and methods that geographers use to analyze spatial patterns and processes.  It is designed to be interactive; we often draw on classmates’ “regions of expertise” to learn from each other. In addition – because fieldwork is central to developing our skills of observation and analysis and to improving our understanding of places and regions – we will also head into the field for some first-hand experience with the Boreal Forest region of northern Minnesota.  Here we will explore the “reinvention” of a natural resource-based regional economy: the impact of iron ore mining on the cities and populations of Minnesota’s Iron Range, the historic and contemporary forestry and paper industries of the area, and the urban redevelopment strategies of the international port of Duluth on Lake Superior. Our visit to the Heritage Center of the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa and stay at the tribal casino hotel will allow us to also experience and explore cultural history and contemporary Native American economic development issues.

In addition to short writing assignments throughout the semester (e.g. map and visual image interpretations, reflective essay, policy recommendation), you will also complete a final research paper on a regional geography question of your choosing (with the help of your writing assistant).  Geographers are broadly trained to analyze and synthesize, and are well prepared to study contemporary issues from urban to rural and from local to global. Come explore the U.S. and Canada with us!

Class meets MWF 10:50 am – 11:50 am in Carnegie 107

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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GEOG 243-01: Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context  (R)
William (Bill) Moseley, Geography Department

From the positive images in the film Black Panther, to the derogatory remarks of President Trump, the African continent often figures prominently in our collective imagination. This class goes beyond the superficial media interpretations of the world’s second largest region to complicate and ground our understanding of this fascinating continent.  As geographers, we will place contemporary African developments in their historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and bio-physical environments, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. We will cover a broad range of sectoral themes, including: health and population dynamics; food and agriculture; cities and urbanization; rural life; parks and peoples; development and underdevelopment; politics and governance; and sociocultural geography and music. This course fulfills the argumentative writing (WA) requirement.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Carnegie 105

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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GEOL 160-01/ENVI 160-01 and GEOL 160-L1/ENVI 160-L1: Dynamic Earth and Global Change  (R)
Karl Wirth, Geology Department

This course provides a framework for understanding natural processes and global change on a dynamic planet.  We will examine the origins of mountains, the eruption of volcanoes, and the drifting of continents in the context of the unifying theory of plate tectonics.  The course will also address surface processes, including landscape evolution, river systems, groundwater, desert environments, and coastal processes, all of which have profound effects on the human condition.  Students in this course will use a variety of approaches to learn, including: lecture, readings, laboratory activities, group projects, and field trips. In particular, the course will emphasize problem-based learning in which students work in groups to address important societal questions.

Class meets MWF 10:50 am – 11:50 am in Olin-Rice 187.  Lab meets Thursdays 8:00 am – 11:10 am in Olin-Rice 187.

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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GEOL 194-01  Flying Dinosaurs and Walking Whales  (R)
Kristi Curry Rogers, Geology Department

This class will change the way you think about your place in the world. We’ll spend the semester journeying back in time, delving into the fossil record of vertebrates, the backboned animals. Living vertebrates range from humans to hagfish, from aardvarks to alligators, and all points in between. We’ll explore the awesome, 500-million year evolutionary history of vertebrates, and use that framework to investigate the factors that shaped them.  We’ll touch on originations and extinctions, the innovation of new body plans, and the functional changes associated with invasion of new habitats. From mouths to jaws, jaws to ears, arms to wings, and fins to legs (and back again), we’ll integrate discoveries in paleontology, geology, and molecular and developmental biology. We’ll discover the little mementos that evolution has left behind in our own human bodies that highlights our ancient fishy origins. The class will include periodic field trips to the Science Museum of Minnesota’s Paleontology Collection. Three hours of lecture each week.

Class meets MWF 1:10 pm – 2:10 pm in Olin-Rice 175

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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GERM 255-01: German Cinema Studies: Art/Horror  (R)
Linda Schulte-Sasse, German Studies Department

One often hears horror movies referred to as trash. Does horror necessarily “deserve” this condemnation (or plug)? Why does an occasional horror film like The Silence of the Lambs win respectability or even a best-picture Oscar? What are the criteria by which we determine whether any film or work of art is good, bad, or perhaps not art at all? The course will examine horror films from various eras and places, some of which were repudiated at their release only to be recuperated later as arthouse classics. But all challenge cultural assumptions about art and horror as mutually exclusive categories, and all employ shock, horror, or the uncanny as compelling means of representing social anxieties and historical traumas. Our objective will be to reflect on questions of aesthetic valuation, and to explore the themes, narrative strategies, and audience effects of horror; we will draw on a variety of theoretical approaches like Freud’s notion of the uncanny or Todorov’s of the fantastic. In some sense horror cinema was “born” in Weimar Germany, so we will begin with silent German films, but our investigations will extend to Universal Studio’s depression-era horror (which owed a debt to German expressionist cinema), to modern horror (Franju, Powell, Hitchcock), and contemporary “post-modern” horror (Argento, Romero, Cronenberg, Haneke).

Course prerequisite: guts.  First, films like Tod Browning’s Freaks (1932) or Franju’s Les Yeux sans Visage (1960) will disabuse you of any notion that Quentin Tarantino invented grossness.  Second, you may find that by seriously engaging film studies, introducing theoretical concepts, and doing what some call “over”-reading, the course will “ruin the fun.”  My hope is that the opposite will be the case (and that fun and work are no more mutually exclusive than art and horror).

Student obligations: a series of short papers, oral presentations, and one longer research paper.  Two exams and an informal log responding to class readings. Hopefully the Twin Cities will offer some cultural events relevant to our theme that we can visit as a class.

Class meets MWF 10:50 am – 11:50 am in Neill 401

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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HIST 137-02: From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War
Linda Sturtz, History Department

In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 “Albany Convention,” Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women’s rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that “All men are created equal.” This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S.  Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own.

Class meets TR 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm in Old Main 010

Writing designation:  WA

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HIST 294-01: First Encounters in History
Karin Vélez, History Department

This first year course invites you to pause at a frontier in your own life to reflect on how past peoples have confronted the other and the alien. How do we behave in the intense moments of first encounters with substantially different people? What are the patterns, pitfalls or unspoken protocols? Case studies we will consider may include first meetings between Vikings, Spaniards, Englishmen, and Native Americans (1000, 1500s and 1620s), missionaries and native peoples in Canada and Africa (1600-1700), Dutch merchants and Chinese warlords (mid-1600s), Europeans and Australian aborigines (late 1700s), doctors and Goliath pygmies (early 1900s), and humans and extraterrestrials (1950-present). In revisiting these moments, we will practice four mainstays of academic conversation. We will read closely and critically, and often quickly and widely, for the purposes of scholarly analysis; we will respond to and make use of the work of others; we will draft and revise texts; and we will make our writing public. These skills are applicable across disciplines and outside of college, but this course focuses on them through the particular lens of History. Class assignments are designed for you to become familiar with the conventions followed by professional historians, culminating in a final assignment where you will present your own original interpretation of a firsthand report of encounter.

Class meets MW 8:00 am – 9:30 am in Old Main 111

Writing designation: WA

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INTL 111-01: Introduction to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture  (R)
David Moore, International Studies Department

One of the most significant trends of the current era has been globalization: the shrinking of distances, the greater interpenetration of the world’s peoples, and the rise, perhaps, of a so-called global culture. Yet it is too simple to say, “it’s all a big mix,” for the questions of how the mixing is done, and who mixes, are complex. By reading important recent literary and nonfiction texts, this course tackles “world” questions: what does it mean to be from a certain place? what is a culture? and who are we in it? Texts will be drawn from U.S. multicultural, “world,” and travel literature, and rich readings in politics, history, anthropology, and cultural critique.  Like all courses in the INTL 110-114 sequence, this course is sufficient preparation for any later 200-level International Studies course.

Class meets TR 8:00 am – 9:30 am in Carnegie 404

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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LING 194-01: Being Human: An Introduction to Language  (R)
Christina Esposito, Linguistics Department

Language is a uniquely human skill; no other animal possesses anything like it.  This course will make you aware of the complex organization and systematic nature of human language. In a sense, you will be studying yourself, since you are a prime example of a language user (for example, how do you pronounce  pecan? Do you call carbonated beverages soda, pop, soda-pop, or Coke? How is plural expressed in your language? ) Most of your knowledge of language, however, is unconscious, and the part of language that you can describe is largely the result of your earlier education, which may have given you confused, confusing, or misleading notions about language. This course is intended to clarify your ideas about language and bring you to a better understanding of its nature. By the end of the course you should be familiar with some of the terminology and techniques of linguistic analysis and be able to apply this knowledge to the description of different languages.

Class meets TR 9:40 am – 11:10 am in Neill 112

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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MCST 128-02: Film Analysis/Visual Culture
Morgan Adamson, Media and Cultural Studies Department

We live in a world populated by images. These images, still and moving, can tell us a good deal about who we are, what we desire, and what we value as a culture—they both reflect and transform the realities of everyday life. Learning to analyze the power of images requires understanding the ways that they are produced, disseminated, and consumed; it requires looking at the ways that images are constructed and reading the codes and conventions that give them meaning. Over the course of the semester, we will develop skills for examining the images that surround us, applying the tools and insights of visual analysis to television, advertising, art, and new media. However, the main focus of the course will be on the cinema. Exploring a wide range of styles, geographies, and theories of cinema, this course will give you the tools and vocabulary necessary to more systematically analyze films. We will look at the evolution of the moving image, studying the transformations the cinema has undergone over the past century, as well as the ways that we, as spectators, have been transformed along with it.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Neill 226

Writing designation:  WA

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MCST 194-01: Critical Studies of Sports in the Media

Leola Johnson, Media and Cultural Studies DepartmentIn this course, we write about  the way the media represents difference and dissent among Black athletes, culminating in recent coverage of “taking a knee” in solidarity with Black victims of police brutality.   Our writing will follow the example of Dave Zirin, a Mac alum and the editor of www.edgeofsports.com. Student blogs will include entries about race and difference among amateur as well as well as professional athletes.  In addition to the blog, every student will produced a 12 to 15 page term paper.  We will also take at least two trips to local sporting events.Our readings, screenings and class discussions will cover representations of Jack Johnson (screening Ken Burns, Unforgivable Blackness);  Muhammed Ali  (The People’s Champ); Eduardo Galeano , Soccer in Sunlight and Shadows; Venus and Serena (screening, Venus and Serena).
Class meets TR 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm in Neill 402
Writing designation:  WA

MUSI 194-01: 33 ⅓
Mark Mandarano, Music Department

33&⅓ will explore the concept of the record album in popular music. Originally made from vinyl with microgrooves that vibrate a needle, this type of record spun at thirty-three and one-third revolutions per minute, resulting in 30 – 45 minutes of recorded sound. The critical community generally agreed that the record album became a medium for making a coherent artistic statement with nuanced overtones on a variety of subjects: teenage angst, anti-war, racial inequality, gender issues and more. In this discussion-based class, students will be encouraged to interpret what they hear and differentiate the strata through which a message is being delivered — in lyrics, instruments, effects, vocals, production techniques, musical style and more. Students will be encouraged to follow the thread of the themes where they may lead with frequent writing assignments documenting this progress. Students will listen extensively to diverse examples of this medium ranging widely from Elvis Presley, James Brown, Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Mary J. Blige, Public Enemy and Lady Gaga. Alongside the list of albums, there will be selected readings of critical commentary to enhance the understanding of history, background and reception.

Writing:
This class will ask students to respond to the subject in writing in a variety of formats and styles. Students will be asked to frequently (approximately once per week) submit a brief (one-page) writing assignment in response to the listening and/or reading. These writing assignments will provide a foundation for in-class discussion. I will provide written feedback on all writing assignments to address clarity, usage, and appropriateness to the assignment. In these assignments we will explore “tone” and how to think of writing for different audiences (for example, one assignment can be a blog entry, another can be a newspaper article). In addition, the students will be asked to submit two papers of a more scholarly nature (one three pages and one seven pages) that will explore a topic of their choosing in greater depth and which will require some research and evidence. These papers will go through a process which will include submission of the topic and an abstract for approval, submission of a draft for feedback in an individual meeting and written feedback and a grade for the final version. We will also devote time in class on how to structure a paper and how to support an argument with evidence.

Class meets MWF 9:40 am – 10:40 am in Music 228

Writing designation: WA

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PHIL 100-01: Introduction to (World) Philosophy  (R)
Joy Laine, Philosophy Department

Typically, introductory philosophy courses focus on one philosophical tradition, that of the West, specifically that of Europe and North America. A more accurate title for such courses might therefore be Introduction to (Western) Philosophy. Some philosophers have even argued that philosophy itself is not a global phenomenon, but a uniquely European tradition that had its origins in classical Greece. In this course we will first examine definitions of philosophy to develop the thesis that rich philosophical traditions can be found elsewhere  –in India, China and the Middle East for example. Using this broader conception of philosophy, we will examine a range of traditional philosophical questions but from a more global perspective, in an effort to create a cross-cultural dialog. (Sample topics: Hume and Al-Kindi on the existence of God; Descartes, Zhuangzi and Śaṇkara on knowledge and skepticism; Aristotle and Dignāga on inference; Locke and Nāgasena on personal identity)

Class meets TR 9:40 am – 11:10 am in Old Main 111

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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PHIL 121-01: Ethics: Happiness and Philosophical Inquiry
Diane Michelfelder, Philosophy Department

Nearly everyone keeps a “to do” list, but not many people keep a “to be” list. If you did keep a “to be” list, though, chances are that “be happy” would be toward the top. But just what is happiness anyway?  What is involved in the pursuit of a happy life? These perennial philosophical questions will be the focus of this highly discussion-based course. In general, this course aspires to do three things. One is to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what philosophers and philosophically-minded thinkers have had to say about happiness, ethics, and the relationship between the two. Another is to give you some sense of the general dimensions of philosophy as an activity—or what it is to “do philosophy”– beginning with the formation of a philosophical question and arriving at the structured presentation of philosophical ideas. The third is to give you the opportunity to do philosophy itself through bettering your skills at deep reading, imaginative and critical thinking, and argumentative writing.  You’ll be expected to write one very short (3 pages) and two short papers (5 pages each) for this course; as well as do in-class reading reflections. Of course there are no guarantees that you will be happier as a result of taking this course, but there is a hope that you will pick up some useful insights about happiness along the way.

Class meets MWF 9:40 am – 10:40 am in Old Main 111

Writing designation: WA

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PHYS 194-01: Rocket Science  (R)
Tonnis ter Veldhuis, Physics and Astronomy Department

Rocket Science is a rocketry themed calculus-based introductory physics course for first-year students only. The course covers standard material such as Newton’s laws, conservation of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum, oscillations and orbital dynamics, but with a strong focus on applying these basic physics principles to rocket propulsion and flight dynamics. Instead of a conventional lab, the course includes a hands-on semester-long project where students design, simulate, build, and fly their own high-power rockets. Apart from the rocket building project, evaluation will take the form of regular problem sets, exams, short papers, and a research paper. Some high school physics and calculus are recommended.

Rocket Science can be substituted for the course Principles of Physics I towards the physics major and provides a solid foundation for Principles of Physics II.

Class meets MWF 2:20 pm – 3:20 pm in Olin-Rice 101

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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PHYS 194-02: The Cosmos  (R)
John Cannon, Physics and Astronomy Department

In this FYC, students will explore various current topics of interest in astronomy.  After building a foundation in basic physics, the course will include discussions about: planets (both within the Solar System and the exploding field of extrasolar planets); the birth, life, and death of stars; exotic remnant objects (e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes); galaxies (including our own Milky Way and external systems); cosmology and the fate of the universe; the “unseen 95%” (dark matter and dark energy); and astrobiology and the question of life in the universe.  This course covers the same material as PHYS113 and PHYS114 (“Modern Astronomy I” and “Modern Astronomy II”), but at an accelerated pace. “The Cosmos” is an ideal FYC for students who are interested in astronomy and who might be considering the physics major with astronomy emphasis. This residential course satisfies the Q1 distribution requirement and the WA writing requirement. Previous exposure to physics and calculus are recommended. This FYC will meet at the same time as PHYS194-01 in order to allow simultaneous sessions when needed.

Class meets MWF 2:20 pm – 3:20 pm in Olin-Rice 100

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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POLI 223-01: The Politics of the World Wars  (R)
Andrew Latham, Political Science Department

This course explores the causes, character and consequences of the two world wars through the disciplinary lenses of both History and International Relations. Among the topics it covers are the origins of the wars, the grand strategies of the major belligerent powers, the political economy of the wars, war crimes and genocides, the “decisive battles” or turning points in the wars, and the world order that emerged out of (and in response to) these conflicts. It will also explore some of the ways in which the two wars have been represented and made meaningful in film, poetry and literature.

Among the questions we address are:

  1. Why did the wars break out, and what does this tell us about the causes of war more generally?
  2. What was the character of the wars?  How were they fought? How did they end?  And what does this tell us about the relationship between economics, culture, technology and war?
  3. How did the wars transform the societies that fought them?  And what does this tell us about the relationship between war and political development?
  4. How did the wars transform the international system?  How did they set the stage not only for the Cold War, but also the ‘minor’ wars running throughout the twentieth century?  And what does this tell us about the impact of war on global political life?

This course will address these questions through a reading of both primary and secondary sources.

Class meets MWF 9:40 am – 10:40 am in Carnegie 208

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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POLI 294-02: The Politics of Architecture and the Built Environment
Patrick Schmidt, Political Science Department

Buildings and the landscape are all around us, but often we take them for granted. This class examines the built environment–the buildings, streets, parks, and communities that we have created–from a political perspective. We explore how architecture embodies the ideals and political tensions of the individuals and societies that create them, and how the physical landscape then shapes the political world. About a third of the course, especially in the early weeks, is based on lectures in architectural history and learning to “read” buildings. Students will write short papers based on visits to buildings and spaces around the Twin Cities. With a foundation of knowledge (pun intended) in being able to identify building styles and traits, the course turns to the analysis of cases including 19th century Paris, Nazi Germany, political protests, and contemporary surveillance. Class discussion and a longer paper will increasingly make connections to the work of political theorists who have written on themes of borders, power, ethics, utopia, and ideas of public and private spaces.

Class meets TR 9:40 am – 11:10 am in Art Commons 202

Writing designation: WA

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PSYC 194-01: How We Remember, Learn, and Decide: Applied Cognitive Science
Brooke Lea, Psychology Department

How do people think, remember, learn, and make decisions?  Philosophers have considered these questions for millennia, and in the last century or so the questions have been taken up in the relatively newer fields of psychology and cognitive science. Recently, significant progress has been made in applying our understanding of human cognition to larger societal goals and challenges.  In this FYC, we will take a psychological approach to the study of human mental processes such as memory, attention, problem solving, and learning. Equipped with evidence-based theories of the mind’s sophisticated yet quirky workings, we will examine how recent advances can be used to dispel popular myths about human cognition, and point the way to societal improvements in the areas of criminal justice, education, and bias-reduction. Our readings will include both primary sources and popular writing from scholars and public intellectuals.

Class meets MWF 9:40 am – 10:40 am in Olin-Rice 170

Writing designation: TBD

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RELI 252-02/AMST 294-02: Martin and Malcolm: Racial Terror and the Black Freedom Struggle Today
(R)
William Hart, Religious Studies Department

America is incomprehensible without reference to black Americans. In this course we explore the complicated lives of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X: how their lives converged and diverged. We analyze the intersections of racial identity, religious affiliation, and political orientation and their relations to the prevailing notions of manhood and American identity. How did Martin Luther King and Malcolm X enter the black freedom movement? How did their religious affiliations facilitate or hinder entry? How did their participation in the movement transform their understanding of religion? In what ways do MLK and X make theological critiques of antiblackness and white supremacy? How do they understand the relations among race, religion, and politics? Is religion central to their respective self-understanding? How do Martin and Malcolm enact—before the fact—the ideas expressed by the Twitter hashtags “#BlackLivesMatter” (created by the activists Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi) and “#SayHerName” (by the poet Aja Monet)?

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Old Main 009

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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RELI 311-02: Ritual
Erik Davis, Religious Studies Department

The word “ritual” is used in many contexts to refer to types of practice that are considered centrally important, as well as formalistic and repetitive. 

This seminar-style course concentrates on the concept of ritual as a central component of social practice, within and without religious groupings. Focusing on developing the concept of ritual, we will focus on ritual across traditions. This requires students to ‘work with’ concepts – forming a conception of what they mean by ritual, and be willing to change that conception when faced with contradictory evidence. As a First Year Course, this class offers an intensive introduction to theories of culture and social thought, and provides persistent and explicit practice in named academic skills.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Old Main 003

Writing designation: WP

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SOCI 190-01: Criminal Behavior/Social Control
Erik Larson, Sociology Department

The use of imprisonment as a form of criminal punishment is only about as old as the United States. Currently, 2.1 million adults–more than one out of every 120 adults–in the United States are in prison or jail. If we include those under probation or parole, the total population under correctional supervision in the U.S. is 6.6 million, or one out of every 38 adults. How should we understand the growth of criminal punishment? How is it similar to other methods to react to and to attempt to control unwanted behavior? What are the social consequences of these formal institutions of social control? In this course, we examine these developments in the processes and organization of social control, paying particular attention to criminal behavior and formal, legal responses to crime. We study and evaluate sociological theories of criminal behavior to understand how social forces influence levels of crimes. We examine recent criminal justice policies in the United States and their connections to inequality, examining the processes that account for expanding criminalization. Finally, we compare the development of formal, bureaucratic systems of social control and informal methods of social control, paying attention to the social and political implications of these developments.

Class meets MWF 2:20 pm – 3:20 pm in Carnegie 208

Writing designation: WA

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SPAN 305-01: Brothers from Another Mother: Exploring Latin America’s Giants, Brazil & Mexico  (R)
(in the drop down box on the registration form look for:  Intro to Hispanic Studies: Brazil and Mexico)
Ernesto Ortiz-Díaz, Spanish and Portuguese Department

Brazil and Mexico are Latin American giants rivaling each other for regional hegemony, but they are also more similar than most people think. Located on opposite geographical, cultural, and linguistic sides of the Americas, Brazil and Mexico share common history, politics, and economy, which has traditionally been overlooked or ignored. Both countries have surpassed their former colonizers –Portugal and Spain– economically and demographically, and they have cemented vibrant individual cultural identities that are recognized across the world.

This class will introduce students to the rich cultural universes of Brazil and Mexico from the 1500s to the present. In and outside the classroom, students will follow the historical paths of both countries through the lenses of their geography, literature, music, painting, sculpture, architecture, dance, and cinema. While we explore these artistic and cultural manifestations, we will reflect on how concepts like nation, identity, race, ethnicity, and class have transformed the face of these countries—and the fate of Latin America.

This course is taught in Spanish and requires that students have attained proficiency at the Spanish 305 or fifth semester level through high school coursework, or that the student has tested into that level via the WebCape placement test that Macalester administers.

Class meets MWF 2:20 pm – 3:20 pm in Neill 215

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor

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THDA 105-01: Seeing Performance in the Twin Cities
Wynn Fricke, Theatre and Dance Department

In this course, first-year students critically attend live dance and theatre performances in the exciting arts scene of the Twin Cities, and articulate their individual reactions by writing reviews, responses, and essays. In this process of studied spectatorship, students acquire the vocabularies of the field. Readings include seminal texts in dance and theatre criticism, as well as manifestos and scholarly articles. We will attend dance and theatre performances at professional venues such as the Walker Arts Center, the Guthrie, Penumbra Theatre, Mixed Blood, Northrop Auditorium, and Cowles Center.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Olin-Rice 301

Writing designation: WA

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THDA 105-02: Seeing Performance in the Twin Cities
Claudia Tatinge Nascimento, Theatre and Dance Department

In this course, first-year students critically attend live dance and theatre performances in the exciting arts scene of the Twin Cities, and articulate their individual reactions by writing reviews, responses, and essays. In this process of studied spectatorship, students acquire the vocabularies of the field. Readings include seminal texts in dance and theatre criticism, as well as manifestos and scholarly articles. We will attend dance and theatre performances at professional venues such as the Walker Arts Center, the Guthrie, Penumbra Theatre, Mixed Blood, Northrop Auditorium, and Cowles Center.

Class meets TR 1:20 pm – 2:50 pm in Library 250

Writing designation: WA

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