Spring Professional Activities Workshop (SPAW)
May 15-18, 2017

Click on the link to register for the workshops.  Spring Professional Activities Workshop.

Funding for the workshops comes from generous support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation through the Digital Ages grant to Macalester College.

Monday, May 15, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Continental Breakfast and Coffee 
DeWitt Wallace Library - Harmon Room
9:00 AM - 10:15 AM
DeWitt Wallace Library – Harmon Room
Developing Departmental Curriculum Plans for Writing (Department Chairs and Program Directors)
Presenter: Dr. Chris Anson, Professor of English, and Director of the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University
Departmental self-study entails the need to evaluate how the curriculum meets the overarching goals of a program. Skills, as much as disciplinary content, need to be developed in a systematic way. For example, teaching writing is a collaborative effort and it works best when it is embedded throughout the curriculum. During this workshop for department and program chairs, Prof. Chris Anson will share some strategies for facilitating conversations with colleagues that should help (1) clarify what types of communication skills graduates of their program should possess; (2) trace and strategize where and how often students get instruction and practice related to these communication skills in the courses offered by a department or program; and (3) create and implement a curricular plan that is more likely to produce the outcomes that the department/program has set for itself. The techniques for curricular mapping that will be shared in this workshop with respect to writing can be applied in tracing the development of other skills and forms of knowledge as well.
10:15 AM - 10:30 AM
Break
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
DeWitt Wallace Library – Harmon Room
Location, Location, Location: Helping Students to Transfer Writing Knowledge and Abilities Across the Liberal Arts Curriculum
Presenter: Dr. Chris Anson, Professor of English, and Director of the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University
How can we help students “connect the dots” between their experiences in different classes? Does writing in the sciences or fine arts help students with their writing in humanities or social science courses and vice versa? The assumption that learners will carry their skills and knowledge from one setting to the next is fundamental to the way we structure courses and curricula, all the way from kindergarten to advanced degree programs. But experience also tells us that students don't always "transfer" their skills and knowledge effectively, but often compartmentalize their learning. In the context of writing, transfer is especially vexed because writing is so highly developmental and because the types, styles, genres and processes of writing are different across contexts and require adaptation, transition, and some degree of trial and error. Increasingly, those intuitions are being supported by research showing that certain kinds of writing-related knowledge don't easily transfer into new and usually more complex settings. In this interactive session, we'll consider the challenges of writing transfer and then discuss strategies that we can use to improve students' abilities to deploy their writing skills and knowledge as they write their way across and beyond diverse educational landscapes.
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
DeWitt Wallace Library – Harmon Room
Lunch
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
DeWitt Wallace Library – Harmon Room
First Year Course “Boot Camp”
For Fall 2017 FYC Faculty only

Presenter: Ann Minnick, Director of Academic Programs and Advising
At this session we'll talk about FYC best practices, including course design considerations, the library session, and working effectively with writing assistants. There will be ample opportunity to ask questions and interact with others teaching a FYC in Fall 2017.
Tuesday, May 16, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Neill Hall, Room 400
Continental Breakfast and coffee
9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Neill Hall, Room 400
Going Public: A workshop on Writing for Academics
Presenter: David Perry, Professor of History at Dominican University.
There’s no such thing as the Ivory Tower. Colleges and universities are not isolated enclaves, and they probably never were. Public engagement is an essential part of the core mission of higher education.

But how do we reach the public? Online and print publications have transformed the traditional pathways of publication, prestige, and engagement. Academics need to be part of the conversation. In fact, the variety of media voices has only made expertise and authority more important.

Dr. Perry will lead you through the process of getting your voice into the public sphere, covering:

The Art of the Pitch
Finding the Right Venue
Managing Social Media Profiles
Getting Paid
Making It Count For Tenure/Promotion
Protecting Yourself From Harassment

He will also talk about strategies to maintain academic authority and be accessible to the broader public.
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Neill Hall, Room 400
Lunch
Wednesday, May 17, 2017                                                                                                    
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Coffee
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Essential Questions for Digital Project Design
Thinking about tackling a new digital project? Want to introduce a digital project or component in one of your courses? This session will introduce some of the essential questions that you should consider as you think about how to design your project or syllabus, select appropriate digital tools, identify your audience and its needs, line up collaborators, and tackle issues of funding and technical support.
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Lunch
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM 
Digital Liberal Arts Deep Dive 

Track Track I:  Inside an Open Educational Resource Initiative: Deconstructing the Grenzenlos Deutsch project
Presenters:  Britt Abel (German Studies) and Ron Joslin (Library)

Have you heard of open educational resources (OER) but are not quite sure whether you should be paying attention to all the hype growing around them? Maybe you are interested in exploring the use of OER in your classroom but have more questions than answers at this point? Are you intrigued by the idea of creating interactive online activities to use with your students? In this workshop, Britt Abel (German Studies) and Ron Joslin (Library) will provide a brief introduction to OER and discuss some of the key issues to think about when exploring the use of OER most effectively. Britt will demonstrate the Grenzenlos Deutsch project, an open first-year German language and culture curriculum that she is developing with a colleague, before actually breaking this project down into its parts: she’ll talk about the process and teach participants how to use the technology involved during this hands-on workshop. Ron will share the support resources being developed by the Library for faculty interested in developing OER for use in their classroom. You will walk away from this workshop with a better understanding of the process involved in creating OER, an opportunity to discover what open educational resources are currently available within your discipline, and will get hands-on experience with the some of the tools available to mix interactive and multimedia content for your own courses.

Track II:  Sow and Grow: The History Harvest Process
Presenters:  Rebecca Wingo (History & CST) and Jennifer Arnold (History & Computer Science Major, ‘19)
The History Harvest is a community-based, student-driven archive project. Over the course of a semester, History Harvest students partner with a community group to run a history event in which members of the community bring artifacts of significance, artifacts that tell their story. Students record community members as they tell stories about their artifacts. Students then digitize the objects for an online archive, and the community members take their items back home. This one-day event is a bit like Antiques Roadshow, except everything is valuable. Back in the classroom, students edit the audio, establish metadata for the items, and upload the items to Omeka, an archival content management system. During this workshop, you will run your own mini-Harvest and learn all the skills you need to teach your own History Harvest next year.

TRACK III: Deconstructing SCOTUSnotes: Building a Crowdsourced Digital Project with Zooniverse
Presenters: Day 1: Day 1: Kevin Ehrman-Solberg (Ph.D. Candidate in Geography, UMN), Ryan Bean (Reference and Outreach Archivist for the Kautz Family YMCA Archives, UMN), and Benjamin Wiggins (Program Director of Digital Arts, Sciences, & Humanities, Affiliated Assistant Professor of History, UMN); Day 2: Timothy Johnson (Morse Alumni Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Law, UMN)
Understanding how Supreme Court Justices' private discussions of cases affects their decisions has been difficult if not impossible because there is no public record of these proceedings. Several past justices kept personal notes of what they and their colleagues said during conference--an incredible record of some 50,000 hand-written pages. To tackle the herculean task of transcribing this remarkable material, Prof. Timothy Johnson and his team have paired with Zooniverse.org, the world’s largest and most popular platform for people-powered research. This research is made possible by volunteers—hundreds of thousands of people around the world who come together to assist professional researchers.

On Day 1, participants will get a hands-on introduction to the basics of crafting a digital project that asks average people to categorize and transcribe images and text. All participants will get to work with the Zooniverse "Project Builder" and by the end of the session they will have their very own functional "workflow" in the platform.

On Day 2 of this workshop, Prof. Johnson will walk participants through the process of designing the project, guide participants through the process of transcription, and introduce participants to a number of tools on the Zooniverse platform.

Track IV:  Capturing and Mapping Social Media Data Using TwitterPresenters:  Eric Shook (Assistant Professor of Geography, Environment, & Society, Univ. of Minnesota)
This Session is Now Full
This workshop will discuss and decompose multiple projects for mapping and making sense of social media data ranging from public response to Superstorm Sandy and the US Presidential Election in 2012 to Ebola in 2014 to major risk events now. Dr. Shook will discuss the exciting prospects and daunting challenges of working with social media data using Twitter, a leading social media platform.  In the hands-on portion of the workshop, participants will learn the basic methods for collecting, filtering, and mapping social media data.  Participants will learn different ways to collect Twitter data, examine data that are embedded in each social media post, and map them using simple pre-written Python programs in the open-source web-application, Jupyter Notebooks. No programming experience or specialized software is necessary to participate in this workshop
2:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Break
2:45 PM - 4:00 PM
Deep Dive Tracks 

Track I:  Inside an Open Educational Resource Initiative: Deconstructing the Grenzenlos Deutsch project

Track II:  Sow and Grow: The History Harvest Process

Track III:  Deconstructing SCOTUSnotes: Building a Crowdsourced Digital Project with Zooniverse

Track IV:  Capturing and Mapping Social Media Data Using Twitter
Thursday, May 18, 2017
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM 
Coffee
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Deep Dive Tracks

Track I:  Inside an Open Educational Resource Initiative: Deconstructing the Grenzenlos Deutsch project

Track II:  Sow and Grow: The History Harvest Process

Track III:  Deconstructing SCOTUSnotes: Building a Crowdsourced Digital Project with Zooniverse

Track IV:  Capturing and Mapping Social Media Data Using Twitter
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Break
10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Deep Dive Tracks

Track I:  Inside an Open Educational Resource Initiative: Deconstructing the Grenzenlos Deutsch project

Track II:  Sow and Grow: The History Harvest Process

Track III:  Deconstructing SCOTUSnotes: Building a Crowdsourced Digital Project with Zooniverse

Track IV:  Capturing and Mapping Social Media Data Using Twitter
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Lunch
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Campus Support Services and Next Steps
What support services exist on your campus?  Join your colleagues and professional staff for a conversation about the services and support available to you as you consider next steps on your digital projects.
2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Break
2:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Deep Dive Tracks Report Out