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Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 11, 2016 at 03:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
AMST 103-01  The Problems of Race in US Social Thought and Policy
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 219 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*First Year Course; first day attendance required*

In this discussion-based and residential course, we will explore the hypothesis that 21st century racism has morphed from simple and evil formulations of bigotry and exploitation into more decentralized and seemingly benign systems of cultural camouflage and ideological control. We will focus particularly on the ways that “structural” inequalities inform complex racial formations, and consequently, individual life chances.

Our interdisciplinary and integrative approach will employ multiple methods of inquiry and expression, including: self-reflective essays and maps; a scavenger hunt along University Avenue; library research; and deep, critical analysis of arguments about race/ethnicity/assimilation/multiculturalism in the novel Americanah and the film "Crash."

We will hone writing and speaking skills through highly structured assignments paired with open-ended conversations in order to discover the questions that truly matter to us. The semester will culminate with a short (8-10 pages) college-level paper shaped by the Green Line light rail along University Avenue.



AMST 194-01  Hunger Games: Map and Mirror for the 21st Century
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required* This introductory-level course uses the youth-oriented Hunger Games trilogy as a platform for launching an adult and scholarly conversation about global inequality, environmentalism, Reality TV, race/gender/sexuality, war, revolution, and the power of love. We will take an interdisciplinary approach; we will read, discuss, write, and interact in ways that are less concerned about adhering to disciplinary traditions than about exploring ideas and problems that are relevant to the 21st century. We will take archery lessons and learn to bake bread. A major goal of the course is to open up our hearts and minds, and to discover more precisely what we hunger for—as scholars, citizens, and human residents of the planet Earth.

Prerequisites: Before the course starts, you should have finished all three books and watched the first movie. Then, to get the instructor’s signature, you need to say (over email or in person) what interesting ideas and perspectives you will bring to the discussion. An equal number of seats will be reserved for each graduating class. May the odds be ever in your favor!

AMST 194-02  American Voices
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Rodolfo Aguilar
*Cross-listed with ENGL 105-01; first day attendance required*

AMST 194-03  American Voices
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Rodolfo Aguilar
*Cross-listed with ENGL 105-02*

AMST 200-01  Critical Methods for American Studies Research
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Nathan Titman
*First day attendance required*

AMST 225-01  Native American History
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with HIST 225-01*

AMST 225-02  Native American History
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with HIST 225-02*

AMST 240-01  Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 215 Brian Lozenski
*Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01; first day attendance required* For wait-listing, see Prof. Kurth-Schai.

AMST 250-01  Race, Place and Space
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01; first day attendance required* How do racial formations manifest in space and place? Through lecture and discussion, we will define what is spatial or “platial.” A prelude on visual culture will help us to engage the difficult practice of “looking” at race and space. Then we consider how race and racism operate at various levels of spatial scale: women’s reproductive health (Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body), urban renewal (Detroit: An American Autopsy, by Charlie LeDuff), and the planet (“A Fierce Green Fire”). This is an interdisciplinary approach so prior exposure to American Studies, Urban Studies, or Environmental Studies will help ground you in this course.

AMST 256-01  Transatlantic Slave Trade
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Linda Sturtz
*Cross-listed with HIST 256-01*

AMST 263-01  African-American Theatre
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Sarah Bellamy
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-06 and THDA 263-01*

AMST 294-02  Race, Class, and Gender in American Photography
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 294-03 and WGSS 294-03*

AMST 294-03  Martin and Malcolm: Racial Terror and the Black Freedom Struggle
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 William Hart
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-01*

AMST 294-04  Latinas/os and the Environment
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Jennifer Peacock
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-05* This course will examine a broad range of Latino/a environmental experiences across time and place in the United States. Taking the environment as a key category of analysis, we will explore the ways that the natural and built environment shapes, and is shaped by, Latino/a culture. Looking to important rural, urban, suburban, and wilderness sites across the US, we will aim to construct a more nuanced “picture” of Latino/a environments. With our methodology placed squarely in historical and visual analysis, we will engage cross/multi-disciplinary analysis frequently to enhance our understanding of key issues such as labor, migration, public health, community building, transportation networks, natural resource development, education, and tourism. We will create depth in our analysis by focusing our attention each week on a single object, such a sugar, automobiles, water, the US/Mexico border, gold, and table grapes, allowing us to consider how Latino/a environmental experiences have changed over time in relation to these objects of material culture. At the same time, we will consider human expressions of place, such as art, literature, and activism, to gain a better understanding of how Latino/as have represented these environmental experiences.

AMST 300-01  Jr Civic Engagement Seminar
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*

AMST 308-01  Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 213 Galo Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*

AMST 330-01  Mellon Seminar
W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 113 Duchess Harris
*Must be one of the ten Mellon Fellows to register; first day attendance required;2 credit course*

AMST 394-01  Slavery and the Body in U.S. Literature and Culture
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 112 Jean Franzino
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-01*

AMST 445-01  Frontera: The U.S./Mexico Border
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 214 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 445-01 and LATI 445-01; first day attendance required*

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 11, 2016 at 03:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
AMST 101-01  Explorations of Race and Racism
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*

AMST 203-01  Politics and Inequality
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Lesley Lavery
*Cross-listed with POLI 203-01* “Democracies, and the citizenries that stand at their center, are not natural phenomena; they are made and sustained through politics and government policies can play a crucial role in this process - shaping the things publics believe and want, the ways citizens view themselves and others, and how they understand and act toward the political system.” Suzanne Mettler and Joe Soss, 2004.

How do the social programs that, when woven together, constitute the American Welfare State, contribute to the lived experiences of American citizens? The readings and assignments in this course are designed to examine this question from a policy perspective. We will examine various theoretical justifications for the policies that constitute the American approach to social welfare. We will then confront and dissect major strands of the American social safety net (looking at evolution across time and political jurisdiction) to better understand how political institutions and policy mechanisms contribute to diversity, and often, inequality, in Americans’ lived experiences (based in race, class, gender, dis/ability, region, political jurisdiction, etc.). Students will then explore and offer new approaches to meeting the needs of a diverse American citizenry.

AMST 237-01  Environmental Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Erik Kojola
*Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and HIST 237-01*

AMST 265-01  The Schools-to-Prison Pipeline
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with EDUC 265-01; first day attendance required; prior exposure to American Studies or Urban Studies is recommended*

AMST 270-01  Black Public Intellectuals
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*

AMST 288-01  Identity, Race, and Ethnicity in Japan
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell
*Cross-listed with INTL 288-01 and JAPA 288-01*

AMST 292-01  Engaging the 21st Century City: Innovation/Inequality/Urban Dev in Twin Cities and Seattle
W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MARKIM 303 Paul Schadewald
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 292-01* This course examines contemporary urban issues in the Twin Cities and Seattle, Washington, to understand the possibilities and challenges of cities in the 21st century. Seattle offers a compelling vantage point for urban learning. The Seattle region is a hub for creative neighborhood engagement programs, a thriving entrepreneurship culture, and communities that have been formed through migration and interaction with the Pacific Rim. The course will critically engage such themes as urban development and gentrification, racial and economic inequality, and the emerging landscape of innovation We will connect academic themes to specific examples from the Twin Cities and Seattle of what it means to live, work, and make positive social change in urban environments. The course meets weekly for 1 ½ hours to develop approaches for understanding urban issues, and includes a mandatory, fully-funded immersive learning experience in Seattle over Spring Break. The permission of instructor is required and all students must complete an application. Accepted students have an option of doing an additional parallel 2-credit independent study on course themes. Applications are due November 18th at 11 p.m. Applications can be found at

http://bit.ly/1NnceIv or contact the instructor.

AMST 294-01  Native American History Since 1900
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-09*

AMST 308-01  Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 217 Galo Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*

AMST 308-02  Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 409 Claudia Giannini
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-02 and LATI 308-02; first day attendance required*

AMST 315-01  Transnational Studies: US Imperialism: From the Philippines to Viet Nam
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 217 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-01* *First day attendance required* In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Vietnam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is imperialism different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the “East”? How did they reshape or reconfigure “American” positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements.

AMST 330-01  Mellon Seminar
W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 113 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course; must be one of the Mellow Fellows to register, course is graded as S/N only*

AMST 341-01  City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

AMST 354-01  Blackness in the Media
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 402 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with MCST 354-01; screening times TBD*

AMST 384-01  Langston Hughes: Global Writer
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTL 384-01*

AMST 394-01  Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: An Oral History Practicum
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 215 Amy Sullivan
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-01* Archives, institutions, and museums have vast, invaluable collections of local, state, and national histories built from the collections they acquire through purchase or donation. But what about the stories and artifacts still in the hands of the people? This hands-on, collaborative course focuses on the Rondo community, an historically African American St. Paul neighborhood bisected and ruined by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s. Over the years, Rondo citizens continued to fight for recognition of what happened to their community. In July 2015, St. Paul issued a formal apology. Students will actively engage in a community-driven project to collect and record the history of Rondo in a variety of mediums--written, oral and digital. Throughout the semester, the Digital History class and the Oral History class will work and meet together to create a meaningful piece of Public History.

Oral History Focus: This team will collect the oral histories of Rondo neighbors, families, and citizens. After immersion in oral history theory and methods, memory and narrative-based histories, students will work with the community to conduct and transcribe video interviews and help create an online repository.The course will include standard lecture and classroom activity, a lab to learn digital methodologies, tools pertinent to the project, and hands-on work in the Rondo community.

AMST 394-02  Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: A Digital History Practicum
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 216 Rebecca Wingo
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-02* Archives, institutions, and museums have vast, invaluable collections of local, state, and national histories built from the collections they acquire through purchase or donation. But what about the stories and artifacts still in the hands of the people? This hands-on, collaborative course focuses on the Rondo community, an historically African American St. Paul neighborhood bisected and ruined by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s. Over the years, Rondo citizens continued to fight for recognition of what happened to their community. In July 2015, St. Paul issued a formal apology. Students will actively engage in a community-driven project to collect and record the history of Rondo in a variety of mediums--written, oral and digital. Throughout the semester, the Digital History class and the Oral History class will work and meet together to create a meaningful piece of Public History.

Digital History Focus: This team will produce a digital history archive for the Rondo community through a model known as the History Harvest (historyharvest.net). Students will work with the community to digitize their artifacts, conduct interviews, and create an online repository.The course will include standard lecture and classroom activity, a lab to learn digital methodologies and tools pertinent to the archive, and hands-on work in the Rondo community.

AMST 400-01  Senior Seminar
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 202 Jennifer Peacock
*First day attendance required*

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