Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

AMST 194-01

Progress and Identity: Race, Gender and Social Movements

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Aisha Upton

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 194-03 and WGSS 194-01* In many contemporary social movements, the roles of race and class may either seem obvious or relatively easy to ascertain. But what happens when we add gender to this mix? What are the different roles that women take on in social movements and how can we account for differences across movements? How do gender, race, and class intersect in social movements? For example, what happens when we compare the ideas of progress in Black Lives Matter and white nationalist movements with particular emphasis on women’s place(s) in the future? In this course, we scrutinize the intersections of race, class, and gender as they relate to the ideals to which movements aspire. Social movements that emphasize concepts such as progress, development, and nation-making indicate visions of the future that can illuminate how gender, race, and class shape peoples’ lives. We will focus on the experiences of women (as individuals and as members of groups or organizations) in their historical and structural locations and explore what concepts such as progress, development, and nation-making mean for women in the struggle over feminist meanings and claims.

AMST 222-01

Imagining the American West

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 222-01*

The American West is central to the construction of America’s identity and popular culture. The mythology of the American West, built on a narrow foundation of Euro-American settlement and conquest, is critical to understanding the role of the West in the national narrative of American history. Using a variety of materials, including films, art and photography, literature, and historical sources, this course will examine how writers, artists, actors, settlers, and government officials, among others, shaped the creation of the mythic West. This course will investigate what – and who – is and is not considered part of this mythology, as well as the ways in which these constructs attempted to make sense of the diverse populations converging in the West. Cross-listed with History 222. (4 credits)

AMST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with History 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

AMST 237-01

Environmental Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Erik Kojola

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and HIST 237-01*

Poor and minority populations have historically borne the brunt of environmental inequalities in the United States, suffering disproportionately from the effects of pollution, resource depletion, dangerous jobs, limited access to common resources, and exposure to environmental hazards. Paying particular attention to the ways that race, ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped the political and economic dimensions of environmental injustices, this course draws on the work of scholars and activists to examine the long history of environmental inequities in the United States, along with more recent political movements-national and local-that seek to rectify environmental injustices. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 237 and History 237. (4 credits)

AMST 270-01

Black Public Intellectuals

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Duchess Harris

Notes: This course will address the tradition of public intellectuals in numerous Black communities. We will expand the definition of "politics" to include theater, literature, and film. We will interrogate the concept of who chooses the scholarly leaders for Black communities. We will examine numerous topics such as Communism, The American Dream, Incarceration, Feminism, and Ebony Voices in the Ivory Tower. (4 credits)

AMST 294-01

Bruce Lee, His Life And Legacy

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: This discussion-based course is entirely focused on Bruce Lee, the actor and leading martial arts icon of the 20th century. Using American Studies and Critical Race Studies frames to examine the construction of racialized and gendered bodies, we will discuss Bruce Lee in terms of his biography, identities, politics, philosophy, and filmography. We will take time to appreciate the entertainment value and athleticism that Bruce Lee brought to his work, but we will also learn to distinguish the commercialized, commodified Bruce Lee (from t-shirts to posters to action figures) from the serious historical figure who symbolized the spirit of cultural independence and political sovereignty around the world. Among the required books and movies: The Tao of Jeet Kune Do, and “Way of the Dragon” (1972). Possible class activities include: guest lectures by film experts, martial arts/self defense lessons, dance instruction (Bruce did the cha-cha!), eating at a Chinese restaurant owned by a martial artist, visiting one of Bruce Lee’s teachers who lives in the Twin Cities, and interviewing the modern-day Bruce Lee personality known as Alex Hing.

AMST 294-02

The Rhetoric of Riot, Protest, and Social Movements

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Jacqueline Schiappa

Notes: This course is designed to promote a rhetorical and historical understanding of social movements in recent history. We will examine communication’s role in seeking social change, including: the issues of power, organization, and audience that advocates confront; the strategies employed to attract members, generate support, gain media attention, combat counter-movements, and influence institutions; and the role of new media in emerging networked movements. Because they have so profoundly influenced both scholars of movement rhetoric and subsequent movements for change, the American social movements of the 1960s (including the various ethnic and civil rights, anti-war, feminist, and countercultural movements) will ground our sampling of more recent and ongoing contemporary movements.

AMST 294-03

Comparative Feminisms: Then and Today

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENGL 294-10 and WGSS 240-01* Feminisms today show new ways of being and also carry the legacies of feminisms past. This course will explore the similarities and differences in feminist concepts and practices in the 20th and 21st centuries, through writings from North and South America, Western Europe, and South Asia. We will compare and contrast inside and also across generations. We will address issues such as racial/ethnic difference, political and sexual autonomy, nationalism, violence, and consumerism, through literature, film, music and other performative arts, and internet publishing. Some writers included are Gwendolyn Bennett, Victoria Ocampo, Grazia Deledda (from past generations) and shani jamila, Sonia Shah, and Adriana Lopez (from recent generations).

AMST 305-01

Race, Sex and Work in the Global Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01*

This seminar presents feminist and queer studies of global capitalism, which examine power relations under contemporary globalization in terms of the racial and sexual dynamics of labor, citizenship, and migration. Course material considers the local and transnational dynamics of free trade, labor fragmentation, and structural adjustment, as these shape industrial and informal labor, and community organizing around gender, sexuality, and HIV/AIDS. The material foregrounds ethnographic analyses of the everyday conditions of people situated in struggles with the effects of global capitalism. (4 credits)

AMST 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with Hispanic Studies and Latin American Studies. (4 credits)

AMST 315-01

U.S. Imperialism from the Philippines to Viet Nam

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. Global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at

U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Viet Nam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is it different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the "East"? How did they reshape or reconfigure "American" positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements. Cross-listed with Asian Studies 315 and History 315. (4 credits)

AMST 330-01

Mellon Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; must be one of the Mellow Fellows to register, course is graded as S/N only*

The Mellon Seminar is for students who are the recipients of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship. The course is interdisciplinary, in order to meet the needs of students across the Mellon-designated fields. They will develop their academic interests to the fullest, with the intent to enter of Ph.D. programs, and careers in higher education. We will cover topics such as "contemporary issues in higher education," "the politics of knowledge production," and "preparing to apply to graduate school." This course is designed to train students who will purse PhDs and subsequent careers in academia in selected core fields in the Arts and Sciences. Our objective is to prepare for the Professoriate. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Graded S/SN only. (2 credits)

AMST 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. Cross-listed with Geography 341. (4 credits)

AMST 354-01

Blackness in the Media

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 354-01*

This course examines mainstream and alternative systems of African American representation in the media from the 1820s to the 1960s, including race records, race movies, the Black press, Black video, and Black appeal radio. It also examines the way Blackness is constructed in the media today, including the role of new media (such as cable and the Internet); new corporate formations (such as FOX, UPN, and BET), and new forms of representation (such as representations that reject the Black-White binary). (4 credits) Cross-listed with Media and Cultural Studies 354.


AMST 394-02

Public History in Action: Rondo History Digital Harvest

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 394-03* This digital history practicum is a hands-on workshop where students will work collaboratively to put on a signature national program called a History Harvest. Created by historians at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, History Harvest is a collaborative, community-based approach to history. The shared experience of giving is at the heart of the History Harvest concept. The project makes invisible histories and materials more visible by working with and within local communities to collect, preserve and share previously unknown or under-appreciated artifacts and stories. Initial "harvests" have taken place in a series of communities across the Great Plains region. At each “harvest,” community-members are invited to bring and share their letters, photographs, objects and stories, and participate in a conversation about the significance and meaning of their materials. Each artifact is digitally captured and then shared in this free web-based archive for general educational use and study. This class will begin by examining the history of Saint Paul’s Historic African American community, Rondo, which was devastated by the development of highway I-94. We will also consider the local and national dimensions and consequences of this tragic event. Since the devastation of their physical community, African Americans who once lived in this vibrant neighborhood have been working collectively to make sure Saint Paul remembers this history and that something like this never happens again. The class will collaborate with community partner, Rondo Avenue, Inc. to implement a History Harvest during spring 2017. After the History Harvest event students will digitally process all of the artifacts in order to make them available to the wider Saint Paul community. No digital skills required but students should know that collaboration, flexibility, and enthusiasm are encouraged for this fun community-based course!

AMST 394-03

Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: Archives

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Rebecca Wingo

Notes: *Course is appropriate for First Years; cross-listed with HIST 394-04* This course has two main foci: archives and digital history. First, we broadly examine the “archive” as records of the past. We will interrogate the role of the archive in preserving and interpreting our knowledge, and explore how institutionalized archives preserve some pasts and repress others. We will cover a wide range of fields to study archives, including public history, museum studies, Indigenous studies, gender studies, and African American history. Concentrating specifically on the latter, our second focus will center around a hands-on archival project in partnership with Rondo Avenue, Inc. (RAI). The Rondo neighborhood in St. Paul is a historically Black neighborhood that was intentionally bifurcated by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s to create a diaspora of the community there. We will read old newspapers produce by and for the neighborhood (preserved on microfilm) and mine them for old business advertisements. We will then plot the businesses on a map and generate timelines of businesses for each address. In addition to producing this map for RAI, students are required to produce a final research paper examining the economic trends of the Rondo neighborhood.

AMST 400-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: THEATR 204
  • Instructor: Duchess Harris

Notes: The Senior Capstone is required of all majors. Majors who meet college criteria are encouraged to conduct an honors project in conjunction with their Senior Capstone. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

AMST 103-01

Problems of Race in US Social Thought and Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 409
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *First Year Course only* In this discussion-based and residential course, we will explore the paradox of a society in which people are increasingly aware of patterns of racism and yet still unable to see or explain how those systems and patterns are connected to everyday life. As awareness increases, why are we not able to develop effective or meaningful responses?

Our interdisciplinary and integrative approach will employ multiple methods of inquiry and expression, including: self-reflective essays and maps; a scavenger hunt along University Avenue; library research; and deep, critical analysis of arguments about race/ethnicity/assimilation/multiculturalism. We will practice engaging in open-ended conversations so that we might discover the questions that truly matter to each of us. To fulfill the WA general education writing requirement, this course will invite you to produce at least 20 pages of college-level writing through various assignments. Each writing assignment will strengthen your use of evidence and argumentation, and will involve drafts, feedback, in person conference, and revision.


AMST 110-01

Introduction to African American Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Duchess Harris

Notes: This class will explore what it has meant to be African-American in the United States, and how this identity shaped Black community, thought, and life. This course, using a variety of disciplinary approaches, exposes students to issues and problems in the development of African-American identity, and provides students with theoretical tools and contextual sensibilities necessary for advanced courses and independent projects in African American Studies. (4 credits)


AMST 194-01

Intro to American Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Nathan Titman

Notes: This course traces the evolution of the field of American Studies and introduces students to the key questions that scholars apply to the study of people and cultures affected by competing discourses about “American” citizenship. Students will read and critically evaluate “classic” American Studies texts that exemplify the shifting contours of the field in various time periods, as well as works that model the discipline’s long history of research that engages with real world political, social, and economic injustice. This is a discussion-based course that will cultivate comprehension of core American Studies concepts and analytical frameworks, while also gauging the role of interdisciplinary research in deepening contemporary understandings of cultures that have circulated within and across the boundaries of the United States.

AMST 200-01

Critical Methods for American Studies Research

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Nathan Titman

Notes: This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary research approaches to the study of race, ethnicity, and other categories of difference. Students will learn to conceptualize and design research projects, and will obtain hands-on experience in executing different methods. The course will also consider the critiques of systems of knowledge production and research approaches that have been informed by scholars from fields such as African American history, gender studies, and critical race studies, as well as from the disciplines. The goal is to develop an understanding of the assumptions embedded in many fields of inquiry, and to learn to apply critical approaches to important research questions.

AMST 225-01

American Indian History to 1871

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 225-01*

The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. European (and, later, Euro-Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands, cultures, religions, politics, and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1871 - the year that Congress stopped making treaties with Native nations - by considering the complicated and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this courses argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience from pre-contact toward the twentieth century. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with History 225. (4 credits)

AMST 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 235-01 and LATI 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with History 225 and Latin American Studies 225. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

AMST 240-01

Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Brian Lozenski

Notes: *Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01; first day attendance required*

This survey course will explore history, policy, and pedagogy as they relate to race, ethnicity, and culture as education. K¿12 public education will be the primary focus with topics including desegregation, standardized testing, multi-cultural and ethnocentric pedagogy, the teacher's role and experience, and significant historical events in education. The course will culminate by analyzing current trends and future expectations in education. (4 credits)


AMST 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01*

In this discussion-based course we focus on the racialized places of U.S. cities, rural towns and suburbs in an effort to understand how social, historic, and spatial forces have colluded to bring about complex and enduring racial formations. We will look for race and related social categories in places around St. Paul and Minneapolis. By engaging theories about visuality and representation, urban development and suburban sprawl, and social movements for racial justice, we will develop a specialized vocabulary for explaining how race, place, and space are connected. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies. (4 credits)


AMST 294-01

American Cultural Landscape

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Jennifer Peacock

Notes:

AMST 294-03

Black Feminist Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Brittany Lewis

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 294-06* The aim of this course is to critically examine key issues, assumptions, and debates in the history and development of Black Feminist Thought in the United States. We will immerse ourselves in the writings and activisms of Black women who invoke Black womanhood as a position from which to speak otherwise concealed truths of power. We will analyze how Black women have resisted dominant cultures tendency to silence their voices through both their written work and the politics of mobilization as a way to bring themselves back into existence, often in response to such issues as racism, classism, sexism, and homophobia among other forms of systemic oppression.

The first section of the course will introduce students to Black feminist ways of knowing paying close attention to intersectionality as a concept and tool of analysis utilizing the scholarly works of historic Black feminist studies scholars such as bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins. Then we will focus our attention on the politics of pleasure and the art of naming oneself a “Black feminist” as contested issues within contemporary Black feminist studies scholarship through scholars such as Jennifer Nash, Evelyn Simien, and Nikol Alexander-Floyd. The second section of the course moves from debates within Black feminism to the politics of writing oneself back into existence as an act of Black feminist activism where Black women from the 19th to the 20th century are viewed as the producers of knowledge (fiction & non-fiction). The third section focuses on Black feminist politics from the 20th to the 21st Century, which aims to reiterate the importance of Black feminism as a contemporary political project not simply a theory of being in the world. This section will examine 1970s Black feminist organizing, Black women’s contemporary participation in national electoral politics, and the rise of Third Wave Black Feminism/Hip Hop Feminism through scholars such as Duchess Harris, Melissa Harris-Perry, Kimberly Springer, Brittany Lewis, and Joan Morgan.

AMST 294-04

Narrating African American Women's 20th Century Resistance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and WGSS 294-04* Using critical biographies of both well-known and lesser known African American women, this course will examine traditions of 20th century African American women’s activism, the ways in which they have changed over time, and also the interior lives of African Amercican women. Too often, the narrative of the “strong black woman” infuses stories of African American women’s resistance, which coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women’s activism. It also seeks to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. We will read biographies of African American women such as Ida B. Wells, Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Lacks, Ella Baker, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Florynce Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan, to name a few. Biographical reading will be coupled with primary sources, documentaries, and additional secondary sources to provide context.

AMST 294-05

Debating the Civil Rights Movement through Film

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with HIST 294-02* This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

AMST 301-01

Critical Prison Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: This Junior Seminar in civic engagement offers upper-level students an opportunity to study - through internships and reflection - and to actively engage with the problem of racialized mass-incarceration on a local, regional, and national scale. During any given semester, the seminar may focus on a specific aspect of the problem, such as: ex-felon disenfranchisement, families and juvenile justice, restorative justice, political prisoners, or prison art and literature. This course requires prior exposure to American Studies (preferably including a critical methods course). Note: The seminar will run concurrently with optional internships specifically created for this course, and a required reflection "lab" period. Placement in these internships is highly recommended. Students must obtain permission to enroll in these internships. Fall semester only. (4 credits)

AMST 301-L1

Critical Prison Studies Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: This Junior Seminar in civic engagement offers upper-level students an opportunity to study - through internships and reflection - and to actively engage with the problem of racialized mass-incarceration on a local, regional, and national scale. During any given semester, the seminar may focus on a specific aspect of the problem, such as: ex-felon disenfranchisement, families and juvenile justice, restorative justice, political prisoners, or prison art and literature. This course requires prior exposure to American Studies (preferably including a critical methods course). Note: The seminar will run concurrently with optional internships specifically created for this course, and a required reflection "lab" period. Placement in these internships is highly recommended. Students must obtain permission to enroll in these internships. Fall semester only. (4 credits)

AMST 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 227
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with Hispanic Studies and Latin American Studies. (4 credits)

AMST 330-01

Mellon Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *First day attendance required; must be Mellon Fellow student to register; 2 credit course*

The Mellon Seminar is for students who are the recipients of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship. The course is interdisciplinary, in order to meet the needs of students across the Mellon-designated fields. They will develop their academic interests to the fullest, with the intent to enter of Ph.D. programs, and careers in higher education. We will cover topics such as "contemporary issues in higher education," "the politics of knowledge production," and "preparing to apply to graduate school." This course is designed to train students who will purse PhDs and subsequent careers in academia in selected core fields in the Arts and Sciences. Our objective is to prepare for the Professoriate. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Graded S/SN only. (2 credits)

AMST 334-01

Cultural Studies and the Media

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 334-01*

An overview of contemporary approaches to media as culture, a determining as well as determined sphere in which people make sense of the world, particularly in terms of ethnicity, gender, identity, and social inequality. Students develop tools for analyzing media texts and accounts of audience responses derived from the international field of cultural studies and from the social theory on which it draws. Analysis emphasizes specificity of media texts, including advertisements, films, news reports, and television shows. Experience in cooperative discussion, research, and publication. (4 credits) Cross-listed with Media and Cultural Studies 334.