Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

AMST 101-01

Explorations of Race and Racism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Duchess Harris

Notes: The main objectives of this introductory course are: to explore the historical construction of racial categories in the United States; to understand the systemic impact of racism on contemporary social processes; to consider popular views about race in the light of emerging scholarship in the field; and to develop an ability to connect personal experiences to larger, collective realities. We will engage several questions as a group: What are the historical and sociological foundations of racial categories? When does focusing on race make someone racist? What is white privilege, and why does it matter? All students will be asked to think and write about their own racial identity. This course, or its equivalent, is required for majors and minors. (4 credits)


AMST 222-01

Imagining the American West

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 222-01*

Fantasies about the U.S. West are central to American history, popular culture, and collective memory. From John Wayne to Zane Grey to Disneyland, ideas about the West have shaped the ways we think about settlement, conquest, race, gender, and democracy. This course examines the myths that have circulated about the West alongside what has been called new western history, in an attempt to make sense of western Americans and the societies they created. Beginning with notions of the frontier, we will consider the scholarship that challenges our thinking about a region that has defied simple constructions. (4 credits)

AMST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with History 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

AMST 237-01

Environmental Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erik Kojola

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and HIST 237-01*

Poor and minority populations have historically borne the brunt of environmental inequalities in the United States, suffering disproportionately from the effects of pollution, resource depletion, dangerous jobs, limited access to common resources, and exposure to environmental hazards. Paying particular attention to the ways that race, ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped the political and economic dimensions of environmental injustices, this course draws on the work of scholars and activists to examine the long history of environmental inequities in the United States, along with more recent political movements-national and local-that seek to rectify environmental injustices. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 237 and History 237. (4 credits)

AMST 270-01

Black Public Intellectuals

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Duchess Harris

Notes: This course will address the tradition of public intellectuals in numerous Black communities. We will expand the definition of "politics" to include theater, literature, and film. We will interrogate the concept of who chooses the scholarly leaders for Black communities. We will examine numerous topics such as Communism, The American Dream, Incarceration, Feminism, and Ebony Voices in the Ivory Tower. (4 credits)

AMST 288-01

Identity, Race, and Ethnicity in Japan

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 288-01 and JAPA 288-01*

From notions of the "pure self" to teenage ganguro ("face-blackening"), Japanese culture is rife with instances of ideology and performance that reflect a deep complexity in its engagement with issues of identity and foreignness. This course traces the roots of this complexity back to Japan's beginnings as a modern nation and examines its cultural development into the present day. Works of fiction will be paired with readings in history and criticism to explore the meanings of identity, race, and ethnicity as they are expressed and contested in Japanese culture. The course will cover the literature of Korea and Taiwan, the experience of domestic minorities, and the contemporary cultures of cos-play ("costume-play") and hip-hop. No prior knowledge of Japanese required. (4 credits). Course is cross-listed with International Studies 288 and Japanese 288.

AMST 294-01

Bruce Lee, His Life And Legacy

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes:

AMST 305-01

Race, Sex and Work in the Global Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01*

This seminar presents feminist and queer studies of global capitalism, which examine power relations under contemporary globalization in terms of the racial and sexual dynamics of labor, citizenship, and migration. Course material considers the local and transnational dynamics of free trade, labor fragmentation, and structural adjustment, as these shape industrial and informal labor, and community organizing around gender, sexuality, and HIV/AIDS. The material foregrounds ethnographic analyses of the everyday conditions of people situated in struggles with the effects of global capitalism. (4 credits)

AMST 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with Hispanic Studies and Latin American Studies. (4 credits)

AMST 315-01

U.S. Imperialism from the Philippines to Viet Nam

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. Global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at

U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Viet Nam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is it different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the "East"? How did they reshape or reconfigure "American" positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements. Cross-listed with Asian Studies 315 and History 315. (4 credits)

AMST 330-01

Mellon Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; must be one of the Mellow Fellows to register, course is graded as S/N only*

The Mellon Seminar is for students who are the recipients of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship. The course is interdisciplinary, in order to meet the needs of students across the Mellon-designated fields. They will develop their academic interests to the fullest, with the intent to enter of Ph.D. programs, and careers in higher education. We will cover topics such as "contemporary issues in higher education," "the politics of knowledge production," and "preparing to apply to graduate school." This course is designed to train students who will purse PhDs and subsequent careers in academia in selected core fields in the Arts and Sciences. Our objective is to prepare for the Professoriate. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Graded S/SN only. (2 credits)

AMST 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. Cross-listed with Geography 341. (4 credits)

AMST 354-01

Blackness in the Media

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 354-01*

This course examines mainstream and alternative systems of African American representation in the media from the 1820s to the 1960s, including race records, race movies, the Black press, Black video, and Black appeal radio. It also examines the way Blackness is constructed in the media today, including the role of new media (such as cable and the Internet); new corporate formations (such as FOX, UPN, and BET), and new forms of representation (such as representations that reject the Black-White binary). (4 credits) Cross-listed with Media and Cultural Studies 354.


AMST 394-01

Latina/o Art

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jennifer Peacock

Notes:

AMST 394-02

Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: An Oral History Practicum

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 394-03*


AMST 394-03

Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: A Digital History Practicum

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Rebecca Wingo

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 394-04*


AMST 400-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jennifer Peacock

Notes: The Senior Capstone is required of all majors. Majors who meet college criteria are encouraged to conduct an honors project in conjunction with their Senior Capstone. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

AMST 103-01

Problems of Race in US Social Thought and Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 409
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *First Year Course only* In this discussion-based and residential course, we will explore the paradox of a society in which people are increasingly aware of patterns of racism and yet still unable to see or explain how those systems and patterns are connected to everyday life. As awareness increases, why are we not able to develop effective or meaningful responses?

Our interdisciplinary and integrative approach will employ multiple methods of inquiry and expression, including: self-reflective essays and maps; a scavenger hunt along University Avenue; library research; and deep, critical analysis of arguments about race/ethnicity/assimilation/multiculturalism. We will practice engaging in open-ended conversations so that we might discover the questions that truly matter to each of us. To fulfill the WA general education writing requirement, this course will invite you to produce at least 20 pages of college-level writing through various assignments. Each writing assignment will strengthen your use of evidence and argumentation, and will involve drafts, feedback, in person conference, and revision.


AMST 110-01

Introduction to African American Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Duchess Harris

Notes: This class will explore what it has meant to be African-American in the United States, and how this identity shaped Black community, thought, and life. This course, using a variety of disciplinary approaches, exposes students to issues and problems in the development of African-American identity, and provides students with theoretical tools and contextual sensibilities necessary for advanced courses and independent projects in African American Studies. (4 credits)


AMST 194-01

Intro to American Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Nathan Titman

Notes: This course traces the evolution of the field of American Studies and introduces students to the key questions that scholars apply to the study of people and cultures affected by competing discourses about “American” citizenship. Students will read and critically evaluate “classic” American Studies texts that exemplify the shifting contours of the field in various time periods, as well as works that model the discipline’s long history of research that engages with real world political, social, and economic injustice. This is a discussion-based course that will cultivate comprehension of core American Studies concepts and analytical frameworks, while also gauging the role of interdisciplinary research in deepening contemporary understandings of cultures that have circulated within and across the boundaries of the United States.

AMST 200-01

Critical Methods for American Studies Research

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Nathan Titman

Notes: This course will introduce students to interdisciplinary research approaches to the study of race, ethnicity, and other categories of difference. Students will learn to conceptualize and design research projects, and will obtain hands-on experience in executing different methods. The course will also consider the critiques of systems of knowledge production and research approaches that have been informed by scholars from fields such as African American history, gender studies, and critical race studies, as well as from the disciplines. The goal is to develop an understanding of the assumptions embedded in many fields of inquiry, and to learn to apply critical approaches to important research questions.

AMST 225-01

American Indian History to 1871

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 228
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 225-01*

The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. European (and, later, Euro-Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands, cultures, religions, politics, and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1871 - the year that Congress stopped making treaties with Native nations - by considering the complicated and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this courses argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience from pre-contact toward the twentieth century. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with History 225. (4 credits)

AMST 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 235-01 and LATI 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with History 225 and Latin American Studies 225. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

AMST 240-01

Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Brian Lozenski

Notes: *Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01; first day attendance required*

This survey course will explore history, policy, and pedagogy as they relate to race, ethnicity, and culture as education. K¿12 public education will be the primary focus with topics including desegregation, standardized testing, multi-cultural and ethnocentric pedagogy, the teacher's role and experience, and significant historical events in education. The course will culminate by analyzing current trends and future expectations in education. (4 credits)


AMST 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01*

In this discussion-based course we focus on the racialized places of U.S. cities, rural towns and suburbs in an effort to understand how social, historic, and spatial forces have colluded to bring about complex and enduring racial formations. We will look for race and related social categories in places around St. Paul and Minneapolis. By engaging theories about visuality and representation, urban development and suburban sprawl, and social movements for racial justice, we will develop a specialized vocabulary for explaining how race, place, and space are connected. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies. (4 credits)


AMST 294-01

American Cultural Landscape

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Jennifer Peacock

Notes:

AMST 294-03

Black Feminist Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Brittany Lewis

Notes:

AMST 294-04

Narrating African American Women's 20th Century Resistance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and WGSS 294-04* Using critical biographies of both well-known and lesser known African American women, this course will examine traditions of 20th century African American women’s activism, the ways in which they have changed over time, and also the interior lives of African Amercican women. Too often, the narrative of the “strong black woman” infuses stories of African American women’s resistance, which coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women’s activism. It also seeks to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. We will read biographies of African American women such as Ida B. Wells, Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Lacks, Ella Baker, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Florynce Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan, to name a few. Biographical reading will be coupled with primary sources, documentaries, and additional secondary sources to provide context.

AMST 301-01

Critical Prison Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: This Junior Seminar in civic engagement offers upper-level students an opportunity to study - through internships and reflection - and to actively engage with the problem of racialized mass-incarceration on a local, regional, and national scale. During any given semester, the seminar may focus on a specific aspect of the problem, such as: ex-felon disenfranchisement, families and juvenile justice, restorative justice, political prisoners, or prison art and literature. This course requires prior exposure to American Studies (preferably including a critical methods course). Note: The seminar will run concurrently with optional internships specifically created for this course, and a required reflection "lab" period. Placement in these internships is highly recommended. Students must obtain permission to enroll in these internships. Fall semester only. (4 credits)

AMST 301-L1

Critical Prison Studies Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: This Junior Seminar in civic engagement offers upper-level students an opportunity to study - through internships and reflection - and to actively engage with the problem of racialized mass-incarceration on a local, regional, and national scale. During any given semester, the seminar may focus on a specific aspect of the problem, such as: ex-felon disenfranchisement, families and juvenile justice, restorative justice, political prisoners, or prison art and literature. This course requires prior exposure to American Studies (preferably including a critical methods course). Note: The seminar will run concurrently with optional internships specifically created for this course, and a required reflection "lab" period. Placement in these internships is highly recommended. Students must obtain permission to enroll in these internships. Fall semester only. (4 credits)

AMST 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with Hispanic Studies and Latin American Studies. (4 credits)

AMST 330-01

Mellon Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *First day attendance required; must be Mellon Fellow student to register; 2 credit course*

The Mellon Seminar is for students who are the recipients of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship. The course is interdisciplinary, in order to meet the needs of students across the Mellon-designated fields. They will develop their academic interests to the fullest, with the intent to enter of Ph.D. programs, and careers in higher education. We will cover topics such as "contemporary issues in higher education," "the politics of knowledge production," and "preparing to apply to graduate school." This course is designed to train students who will purse PhDs and subsequent careers in academia in selected core fields in the Arts and Sciences. Our objective is to prepare for the Professoriate. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Graded S/SN only. (2 credits)

AMST 334-01

Cultural Studies and the Media

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Leola Johnson

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 334-01*

An overview of contemporary approaches to media as culture, a determining as well as determined sphere in which people make sense of the world, particularly in terms of ethnicity, gender, identity, and social inequality. Students develop tools for analyzing media texts and accounts of audience responses derived from the international field of cultural studies and from the social theory on which it draws. Analysis emphasizes specificity of media texts, including advertisements, films, news reports, and television shows. Experience in cooperative discussion, research, and publication. (4 credits) Cross-listed with Media and Cultural Studies 334.