Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

LATI 181-01

Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 181-01*

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. (4 credits). Cross-listed with History 181.

LATI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Political Science 245. (4 credits)

LATI 249-01

Regional Geog of Latin America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01*

This course explores one of the world's most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments fosters great cultural diversity, as well: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Through projects that explore different elements of Latin America's cultural geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region. (4 credits) Course cross-listed with Geography 249.

LATI 255-01

Peoples and Cultures of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 255-01*

Cross-listed with Anthroplogy 255. This course is an introduction to the cultural diversity and complexity of Latin American societies. We will examine regional differences from an anthropological perspective and discus how social institutions and cultural practices and traditions have been shaped, and how they have dealt with continuity and change. Ethnographic case studies will allow us to explore relevant topics related to ethnicity, social stratification, gift-giving/reciprocity, kinship, rural/urban relationships, cosmology and religion, and gender. These issues will be examined within the context of particular histories, considering the legacy of colonialism, the formation of the nation-state, the emergence of social movements, post-colonial nationalism, the impart of migration and urbanization, and the effects of neo-liberalism and globalization. We will conclude with a critical examination of forms of representation of Latin America, which involve notions such as -indigenismo-. (4 credits)

LATI 281-01

The Andes: Race, Region, Nation

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 281-01*

This course provides a survey of Andean history with an emphasis upon the formation of collective identities. Class discussion will treat continuities and divergences between the Andean colonial and post-colonial experiences, especially the intersection between racial and regional tensions and their impact upon the emergence and construction of nation-states. Recent topics explored have included the role of landscape in Andean culture, Incan and neo-Incan cultural mythologies, the conflation of racial and class identities in the twentieth century, violence and guerrilla movements, urbanization, and the various shades of indigenismo. (4 credits). Cross-listed with History 281.

LATI 307-01

Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 227
  • Instructor: J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*

This course presents the student with essential tools for the critical analysis of a broad range of topics and forms of cultural production (literature, cinema, art, e-texts, etc) in the Hispanic world. It also teaches the student advanced language skills in written composition and public oral presentation. (4 credits)

LATI 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with American Studies and Hispanic Studies. (4 credits)

LATI 394-01

Science, Empire, Vis Culture

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 394-01*


Fall 2016

LATI 141-01

Latin America Through Women's Eyes

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01*

Latin American women have overcome patriarchal "machismo" to serve as presidents, mayors, guerilla leaders, union organizers, artists, intellectuals, and human rights activists. Through a mix of theoretical, empirical, and testimonial work, we will explore issues such as feminist challenges to military rule in Chile, anti-feminist politics in Nicaragua, the intersection of gender and democratization in Cuba, and women's organizing and civil war in Colombia. Teaching methods include discussion, debates, simulations, analytic papers, partisan narratives, lecture, film, poetry, and a biographical essay. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-pressure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Cross-listed with Political Science 141 and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 141. (4 credits)

LATI 194-02

Politics of Truth and Memory in Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *First Year Course; first day attendance required; cross-listed with ANTH 194-02* This course examines and critically analyzes various approaches to the study of how different individuals and communities in particular historical and cultural scenarios in contemporary Latin America create meanings about their past experience with political violence. The course addresses questions related to the tension between remembering and forgetting, the presence of conflicting memories and truths and how these are negotiated or not through distinct forms of representation. The cultural analysis of different means of representation: human rights and truth commissions’ reports, testimonials, film, art and memorials will be the basis for class discussions on different notions of truth and different forms of truth-telling. A close examination of these forms of representation will reveal the extent to which they can conflict with each other while at the same time feed on each other, creating “effects of truth” and leaving room for secrecy as a mode of truth-telling. Finally, the course will also compel students to think about what consequences the politics of memory have for the future. This course will combine lectures and class discussions. It will have a strong writing component with a series of short papers and one longer final research paper. There will be one final exam. Grades will be based on written assignments in addition to oral presentations and participation in class discussions.

LATI 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 235-01 and HIST 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with American Studies 225 and History 225. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

LATI 307-01

Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Galo Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*

This course presents the student with essential tools for the critical analysis of a broad range of topics and forms of cultural production (literature, cinema, art, e-texts, etc) in the Hispanic world. It also teaches the student advanced language skills in written composition and public oral presentation. (4 credits)

LATI 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 227
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with American Studies and Hispanic Studies. (4 credits)

LATI 341-01

Comparative Social Movements

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 341-01* Can the evolution of Occupy Wall Street help us anticipate the trajectory of Black Lives Matter? How did the Arab Spring and Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement deploy a similar tactical repertoire, yet provoke different outcomes? Did partisanship lead the peace movement to resist Bush’s “War on Terror” but shrug at Obama’s drone war? And does mobilization of identity explain how indigenous Bolivians ejected U.S. corporations and trounced the white power structure? This advanced research seminar engages theories that explain the origins and development of movements struggling for subsistence rights, labor rights, gender and sexuality rights, social rights, and racial and ethnic rights. Students planning to conduct social movements research while studying away may write a major research prospectus to launch that field research project.

LATI 394-02

Journeys through Brazil

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 111
  • Instructor: J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 394-02* This intermediate course in Portuguese focuses on the civilization and cultures of Brazil. Despite its continental size and being the 6th largest world economy, Brazil remains a mystery to many. In this class we will explore the socio-historical, political and cultural trajectory Brazil has undertaken while, at the same time, reflecting on how ideas such as nation, identity, race, ethnicity, and class have transformed the face of the country. We will use a wide array of texts and materials –literature, music, painting, sculpture, architecture, dance, and cinema– to gain a broad and critical understanding of the Brazilian universe. Join us on these journeys of discovery! This course will be taught in Portuguese. Pre-requisite: HISP 331 or consent of the professor.

LATI 446-01

Constructions of a Female Killer

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 446-01 and WGSS 346-01; first day attendance required*

The rise in femicide across Latin America, most shockingly exhibited in the city of Juarez, Mexico, has resulted in broad discussions of women's relationship with violence. However, what happens when the traditional paradigm is inverted and we explore women as perpetrators, rather than victims, of violence? This class will dialogue with selected Latin American and Latino narratives (including novels, short stories, films, and newspapers) constituting different representations of women who kill. (4 credits) Course crossed listed as Hispanic Studies 446 and Women's and Gender and Sexuality Studies 346.

LATI 488-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: An integrative, research-oriented capstone which gathers senior majors of diverse regional and disciplinary focuses during the final semester. A faculty convener will integrate a schedule of issue-area seminars, faculty methods and topics presentations, talks by visiting speakers, and student reports on research projects. The course culminates in a lengthy final paper. (4 credits)