Class Schedules

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Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 10, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ENVI 140-01  The Earth's Climate System
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 140-L1  The Earth's Climate System Lab
R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 160-01  Dynamic Earth/Global Change
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Alan Chapman
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-01*

ENVI 160-02  Dynamic Earth/Global Change
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with GEOL 160-02* This course provides a framework for understanding natural processes and global change on a dynamic planet. We will examine the origins of mountains, the eruption of volcanoes, and the drifting of continents in the context of the unifying theory of plate tectonics. We will also learn about surface processes, including landscape evolution, river systems, groundwater, desert environments, and coastal processes, all of which have profound effects on the human condition. In this course, you will use a variety of approaches to learn, including: lecture, readings, laboratory activities, group projects, and field trips. In particular, the course will emphasize problem-based learning in which students work in groups to address important societal questions.

ENVI 160-L1  Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab
M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L1*

ENVI 160-L2  Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab
T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L2*

ENVI 160-L3  Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab
R 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*First Year Lab only, cross-listed with GEOL 160-L3*

ENVI 194-01  Cycling the Urban Landscape: A Bicycle Field Course
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Margot Higgins
*Attendance is required on several bicycle field trips that will extend beyond the regularly scheduled T/TH meeting time into the community meeting time.* This course will present a critical history and politics of bicycling from local, regional, and national perspectives. There has been a recent resurgence of bicycle riding in many urban settings. What has transformed bicycle advocacy from being a fringe political movement to one that now influences mainstream shapers of urban space? How can bicycling integrate with or replace an auto-centric society? We will examine how cities with and with out a historical presence of cycling have promoted cycling programs, infrastructure and bicycle culture. What have been the central obstacles that city planners and activists have faced? Who benefits from improved cycling and which people are left out? This course will include lessons on how to make city cycling more feasible and safe (even in Minnesota winters), guest lecturers, reading responses, short homework assignments, an introduction to research methods, proposal writing, and group projects. Counts for social science general distribution credit.



ENVI 215-01  Environmental Politics/Policy
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 221-01  Environmental Ethics
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with PHIL 221-01*

ENVI 231-01  Environmental Economics and Policy
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Sarah West
*Cross-listed with ECON 231-01*

ENVI 234-01  American Environmental History
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 270-01  Psychology of Sustainable Behavior
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with PSYC 270-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 285-01  Ecology
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 1st with permission of the instructor*

ENVI 285-L1  Ecology Lab
T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 1st with permission of the instructor*

ENVI 285-L2  Ecology Lab
T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 1st with permission of the instructor*

ENVI 294-01  Outdoor Environmental Education in Theory/Practice
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Dosch, Kurth-Schai
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with EDUC 294-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* This course provides an introduction to outdoor environmental education at the elementary school level. Macalester students will partner with teachers and students from local schools, families with school-age children, and youth organizations to explore interdisciplinary approaches to outdoor environmental education. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and will adapt curriculum from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and other sources to help elementary school teachers and students fulfill Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards and assist youth organizations in achieving their environmental education goals. Students will participate in a weekend retreat early in the semester and weekly lab sessions including fieldtrips and three teaching sessions for elementary school students at the Ordway.

ENVI 294-02  Americans and Global Parks and Wilderness
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Margot Higgins
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-04* Concurrent with the recent 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act in 2014, and the upcoming National Park Service Centennial in 2016, this course will offer a historiography of national park and wilderness policy. We will look at how and why preservation goals have changed over time, and the impacts these models and ideologies have had nationally and internationally. Students will analyze the positive gains and consequences of wilderness preservation and we will address recent debates about related policies, including co- management and whether or not people should live in parks or wilderness. Throughout the semester we will examine a variety of wilderness perspectives – including those from people who have no word for “wilderness.” Course material will include primary source documents, oral histories, film, popular media, and writings by colonial settlers, wilderness advocates, and critical scholars.

ENVI 294-03  Modeling Earth Systems
T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 189 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* The Earth is full of large, complex systems. Often, these systems involve one or more components that make them impractical to study directly in nature because they are inaccessible (e.g. Earth’s core), very slow (e.g. plate tectonics), or simply because they are too large to observe in their entirety (e.g. the climate system, or ocean circulation). One possible solution is to use numerical models to generate and test hypotheses by simulating the processes most important to each system. In this course we will use papers from the scientific literature as the basis for modeling a new system each week. We will create models and run experiments using STELLA, a visually based modeling software package. Topics include (but are not limited to) population growth, Earth’s climate, the flow of ice in glaciers, and ocean circulation. For the final project students will spend several weeks designing a model of a system of their own choosing. No previous Macalester courses in math or computer science are required; exposure to calculus may be helpful, but students can be highly successful without it. This course is designed for students with a basic knowledge of systems thinking within any related scientific discipline, and a willingness to experiment. Counts for math/natural science general distribution credit.

ENVI 294-04  Science, Nature, and Society
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Claude Peloquin
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-03*

ENVI 294-05  Latinas/os and the Environment
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Jennifer Peacock
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04*

ENVI 294-L1  Outdoor Environmental Education in Theory/Practice Lab
R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Dosch, Kurth-Schai
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with EDUC 294-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 343-01  Imperial Nature: The US and the Global Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 394-01  Climate Talks: Dispatches from Paris
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
Please note: this course has reached the approval maximum. Questions about registration may be directed to the instructor. *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; not open to ACTC registration* There is an application process for this course and a $1400 course fee. National governments that are parties to the UN’s Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are engaged in intensive negotiations leading up to the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP-21) in Paris in December 2015. The intended outcome of COP-21 is a new climate change treaty, which would represent a key turning point for global environmental governance. Students enrolled in this seminar course will function as a research team and observe negotiations in Paris. To prepare, early in the Fall semester the team will investigate the history of climate negotiations, the cultures of UN conferences, and the views of selected parties in the negotiations. The team will draw on their newly acquired knowledge to develop research questions and a research plan for fieldwork in Paris. Team members will receive instruction in event ethnography, interviewing techniques, and technical skills for using video and audio equipment, as well as blogging and social media technologies for communicating about the negotiations and the research project.

ENVI 478-01  Cities of the 21st Century
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 488-01; first day attendance required; this is a Geography Senior seminar*

ENVI 489-01  Environmental Leadership Pract
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 490-01  Envi St Leadership Seminar
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 10, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ENVI 130-01  Science of Renewable Energy
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-01; first day attendance required*

ENVI 133-01  Environmental Science
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Daniel Hornbach
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 133-L1  Environmental Science Lab
T 08:30 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Dosch, Hornbach
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 194-01  Bicycling the Urban Landscape
R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Margot Higgins
With an emphasis on winter cycling, this course will expand on the bicycle course offered in the 2015 fall semester. The overarching goal this course is to provide intellectual and active engagement with bicycling. This includes understanding local, national, and global trends in in bicycling, bicycle politics, and infrastructure. We will begin the semester by considering the history and politics of bicycling in relation to other forms of transit. Next, we will examine the cultural, economic, and social dimensions of bicycling, in addition to a variety of local perspectives on bicycling. What does a successful urban bike landscape look like and what have been the central obstacles that city planners and activists have faced? What is bicycle equity? Who promotes and benefits from bike improvements and why is there opposition to cycling? How can urban planners make city cycling more feasible and safe (even in Minnesota winters). This course will include guest lecturers and field trip leaders, reading responses, short essays, an introduction to research methods and final group projects. We will pay particular attention to the perceived barriers among different income levels and cultural groups that prevent people from realizing all the benefits year-round cycling can support in terms of health, happiness and equality. Students will be required to attend the Winter Cycling Congress which will be held in the Twin Cities February 2-4. Attendance is also required on several bicycle field trips that will extend beyond the regular class meeting time. Students must have clothing and bicycles that are appropriate for a variety of weather conditions.

ENVI 202-01  Sustainability and the Campus
T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MARKIM 303 Suzanne Savanick Hansen
*2 credit course; first day attendance required*

ENVI 215-01  Environmental Politics/Policy
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 401 Margot Higgins
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 225-01  100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with LING 225-01; first day attendance required*

ENVI 232-01  People, Agriculture and the Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*

ENVI 234-01  American Environmental History
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Margot Higgins
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 237-01  Environmental Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Erik Kojola
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and HIST 237-01*

ENVI 252-01  Water and Power
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with GEOG 252-01 and POLI 252-01*

ENVI 258-01  Geog of Environmental Hazards
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Claude Peloquin
*Cross-listed with GEOG 258-01*

ENVI 280-01  Environmental Classics
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Christina Manning
*First day of attendance require; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 285-01  Ecology
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 226 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 285-L1  Ecology Lab
R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 285-L2  Ecology Lab
R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

ENVI 294-01  Environmental Sociology
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Terry Boychuk
Cross-listed with SOCI 294-01* This course provides an overview of environmental activism, politics, and policy making in the United States in historical and comparative perspective. Select questions included: Are human societies invariably destined to environmental collapse? What are the fundamental obstacles to sustainable environmental policies in democratic societies? Has consumer activism greened US markets and corporations? How do environmental political lobbies emerge? How do they become institutionalized? Which policy networks have led the campaign to regulate greenhouse gases in US? Why have these political initiatives failed? Who opposes environmental action on climate change, and why? Why have the US and Europe responded differently to the problem of global warming? What are the prospects for a quick transition from a fossil-fuel economy to one based on clean energy?

ENVI 294-02  Literature and the Environment:Between Eden and The Apocalypse
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Benjamin Voigt
Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02* Since colonization, American literature has often imagined nature as either a pristine Eden, dangerous wilderness, or some combination thereof. From Walden to The Walking Dead, our literary landscapes tend toward the primeval and the post-apocalyptic, the threatened and the threatening. In this course, we will consider the place of place in an eclectic array of American texts. We’ll begin with a few foundational readings, but quickly depart for stranger shores: westerns, sci-fi, postmodern poetry. As we travel, we'll ask a wide range of questions about identity, genre, and form, but we’ll pay particular attention to the way each artwork mediates competing impulses towards the environment. Coursework will include reading responses, two short analytical essays, and a final project. Creative writers (or those so inclined) will have the opportunity to write creatively for certain assignments. Non-majors are enthusiastically invited. Possible texts include: fiction by Colson Whitehead, Joe Wenderoth and William Faulkner; creative nonfiction by John D’Agata, Eula Biss and Sherman Alexie; poetry by Cathy Park Hong, Harryette Mullen, and Lorine Niedecker; films by Steven Spielberg, Jim Jarmusch, and Shane Carruth; and music by Joanna Newsom.

ENVI 294-03  Environmental Issues and the Media
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 401 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-01*

ENVI 294-04  Eating for Change? Food, Media and the Environment in US Consumer Culture
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Heidi Zimmerman
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-02* In recent years, consumer culture has seen an explosion of media urging individuals to do their bit for the environment by thinking carefully about their food choices. What are we to make of this? This course investigates the historical, economic, and cultural politics of food as a mediated environmental object. The course is organized according to two structuring logics: context and case studies. We will contextualize the intersection of food and the environment within broader questions of race, gender, and class, of labor, the political economy of media and agribusiness, and of the history of capitalism and consumer culture in the United States. We will work through these themes by investigating a series of media case studies dealing with issues related to food and the environment, ranging from books and magazines to television and films, and from video games and blogs to brands and advertising. In this course, students will bring social and cultural theory to bear on these texts and develop critical skills in multimodal writing and analysis.

ENVI 294-05  Environmental History of Europe/Empires
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Julia Fein
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-03; Not open to students who took ENVI 294, Environmental History of Modern Europe, during the fall 2014 semester.*

ENVI 294-06  Introduction to Urban Ecology
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 I-Chun Catherine Chang
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with GEOG 294-01* Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between human, urban ecosystems and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will also apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field research, and case studies.

ENVI 394-01  Sustainability for Global Citizenship
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 213 Phadke, Zis
*Cross-listed with POLI 394-01; permission of instructor required* This seminar invites students in their sophomore or junior year, with interest in any disciplinary field, to deepen their understanding of sustainability through real-world problem solving. The seminar uses a sustainability framework for considering the political, economic, environmental, and social dimensions of these problems and their potential solutions. All seminar participants commit to a 6-month learning endeavor, comprised of (1) a spring semester course and (2) a paid summer practicum. In the paid practicum, students will be working with an organization to address a problem related to sustainability. The application deadline for participation in the 2016 Sustainability for Global Citizenship cohort is Oct. 26, 2015. Please see either instructor for application information.

ENVI 488-01  Sr Seminar in Environmental St
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells
*ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor; S/SD/NC grading*

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