Class Schedules

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Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated December 22, 2014 at 03:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GEOG 111-01  Human Geography of Global Issues
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
 
GEOG 111-02  Human Geography of Global Issues
MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 107 Nicole Simms
 
GEOG 201-01  Introduction to Urban Studies
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Paul Schadewald
 
GEOG 201-02  Introduction to Urban Studies
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*First Year Course only*

GEOG 225-01  Intro to Geog Info Systems
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus
*Permission of the instructor required; $25 course fee required*

GEOG 225-L1  Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 225-L2  Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab
W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 241-01  Urban Geography
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
 
GEOG 242-01  Regional Geography of the US and Canada
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
$35 course fee required*

GEOG 243-01  Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*First Year Course only* This class goes beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent to complicate our understanding of this fascinating region. As geographers, we will place contemporary African developments in their historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and physical geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course covers a broad range of contemporary topics, including: human-environment interactions (forest and drylands management); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); political geography (democratization, conflict); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); and social geography (African women and development, education).

GEOG 250-01  Race, Place and Space
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with AMST 250-01; first day attendance required*

GEOG 252-01  Water and Power
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor; ENVI/GEOL 120 or ENVI 133 or ENVI/GEOG 232 are useful background but not required*

GEOG 256-01  Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Eric Carter
 
GEOG 258-01  Geography of Environmental Hazards
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter
*Cross-listed with ENVI 258-01; first day attendance required*

GEOG 262-01  Metro Analysis
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
 
GEOG 294-02  Land Change and Conservation Planning: Understanding and Mitigating a Threat to Critical Habitat
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Robert Rose
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02* The world is in the midst of a biodiversity loss crisis, driven in part by a loss of critical habitat. An estimated 96 elephants are lost each day, a scant 3500 tigers remain in the wild and vast habitats from rainforest to open grassland to coral reefs are rapidly degrading. Since conservation practitioners have limited resources, they need to understand drivers of habitat loss and degradation, carefully choose and prioritize their strategies to prevent further loss, monitor whether those strategies are effective, and change strategies when they are not working. Furthermore, to obtain support from funders, partners, or stakeholders, practitioners need to be able to clearly communicate their goals and strategies, demonstrate their effectiveness, and rely on clear, transparent decision-making. This course draws on the instructor's experience in conservation management at the Wildlife Conservation Society and is designed to introduce students to two critical components of conservation practice: understanding how land use and land cover change threaten critical habitat, and developing a management plan to reduce the threats in a landscape. The course will culminate in a series of mock stakeholder exercises to develop a management plan to curb habitat loss in the Madidi-Tambopata protected area in Bolivia and Peru. Students completing this course will: (1) be familiar with the prominent theories of land change; (2) be able to identify drivers and proximate causes of land change; (3) understand how to assess monitor and predict land change over time; (4) be fluent in the language of conservation planning and adaptive management; and (5) participate in the development of a management plan to reduce habitat loss in one real-world conservation landscape.

GEOG 362-01  Introduction to Remote Sensing
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Robert Rose
*$25 course fee required; crosslisted with ENVI 394-01*

GEOG 362-L1  Intro to Remote Sensing Lab
R 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-L1*

GEOG 364-01  GIS and Community Partnerships
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Holly Barcus
*$25 course fee required*

GEOG 488-01  Comparative Environment and Development Studies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; this is a Geography Senior seminar*

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated December 22, 2014 at 03:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GEOG 111-01  Human Geography of Global Issues
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
 
GEOG 225-01  Intro to Geog Info Systems
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus
*Permission of the instructor required; $25 course fee required*

GEOG 225-L1  Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab
W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 225-L2  Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab
T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 232-01  People, Agriculture and the Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*

GEOG 248-01  The Political Geography of Nations and Nationalism
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau
 
GEOG 249-01  Regional Geog of Latin America
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Eric Carter
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01*

GEOG 256-01  Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter
*Counts for the Community and Global Health concentration*

GEOG 263-01  Geography of Development and Underdevelopment
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 105 William Moseley
*First day attendance required*

GEOG 292-01  Engaging Seattle: Urban Innovation on the Pacific Rim
W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MARKIM 303 Paul Schadewald
*2 credits; S/N grading only; permission of instructor required* Priority application due date is December 10th; email instructor for application (schadewald@macalester.edu). This course examines contemporary urban issues in Seattle, Washington as a way to understand the possibilities and challenges of cities in the 21st century. Seattle offers a particularly compelling vantage point for urban learning. The Seattle region is a hub for innovative neighborhood engagement programs, sustainability initiatives, a thriving start-up culture, and communities that have been formed through interaction with the Pacific Rim. We will examine Seattle’s unique approaches to urban and community development, reflect on how Seattle compares to the Twin Cities, and discuss what Seattle can teach us about cities, innovation, and civic engagement more broadly. The course meets weekly for 1 ½ hours during the semester. It includes a mandatory, fully funded immersive learning experience in Seattle over spring break.

GEOG 294-01  Geographies of Consumption:Power, Identity, and Space in Consumer Culture
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Nicole Simms
In this discussion-based class, we will explore historical and contemporary practices of consumption and their variations across different sites, including malls, garage sales, homes, and online exchange platforms such as eBay and Craigslist. We will consider the consumption, use, production, distribution, and marketing of a variety of goods as we seek to understand not only individual and societal questions of need, choice, and citizenship, but also the ways in which everyday practices of consumption are related to wider issues of power and inequality. Together, we will interrogate: How (and where) desire, status, and identity are constructed in consumer culture, and how these constructions intersect with traditional identity markers such as gender, race, and class; How the everyday practices of consumption are embedded in much larger globalized networks of production and distribution, and; The political possibilities of consumption, including participation in second-hand, virtual, and counterfeit economies, supporting organic and fair trade products, and engaging in consumer boycotts.

GEOG 341-01  Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

GEOG 365-01  Urban GIS
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith
*Permission of instructor required; $25 course fee required*

GEOG 365-L1  Urban GIS Lab
TBA TBA Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 370-01  Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Ashley Nepp
*$25 course fee required*

GEOG 370-L1  Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization
W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 378-01  Statistical Research Methods in Geography
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 Laura Smith
 
GEOG 394-01  Minnehaha Creek - Planning for an Urban Watershed
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 David Lanegran
In this seminar we will analyze the urbanization and economic development of the watershed of Minnehaha Creek. We will examine the landscape changes that came with urbanization, the dynamics of floods, changing perceptions and plans for public spaces, and the revisualization of the creek that have occurred over the past century. We will use the techniques of the “Landscape School” of geography as well as engage in applied urban geography. Students will select individual or group research projects that will document the development of the land in the watershed, the various plans developed by the several municipalities through which the creek flows and present patterns of land use and development. We will also try to assess the iconographic role the watershed plays in the imaging of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. The class product will be a series of case studies of how cities in the watershed have dealt with their segments of the creek. Each student or team will develop two case studies and then at the end of the class we will produce a document that compares and evaluates these approaches. A second potential product will be an atlas of the watershed made up of a variety of thematic maps of the cultural landscape. Because we are engaged in a field seminar the vast amount of the work for this class will occur outside of class in the field and in research centers in the region. Field research logistics will be an important feature of the class. Students will work as individuals or in teams to the greatest degree possible. However we will make some reconnaissance trips as a class. We will also organize several research days during which a van will drop individuals and teams at research locations and collect them later. No prerequisites.

GEOG 394-02  Advanced GIS for Health
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Eric Carter
This course builds on skills learned in the Introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course by focusing explicitly on geospatial techniques used for analyzing problems in public health. Through lectures, discussions, hands-on labs, and collaborative group work, students will learn how to access, process, and map health outcomes data. Using advanced spatial-statistical and epidemiological tools, we will analyze health disparities, neighborhood effects on health, and spatial clustering of disease events, such as rare cancers. We will use similar techniques to examine environmental health and environmental justice questions in a spatial framework; analyze the spread of infectious diseases; model the spatial ecology of vector-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease and malaria; and optimize spatial access of populations to health care services. Students will be required to complete a final independent project. Lab section registration is required. Three lecture/laboratory hours per week required. $25 materials fee is charged. Prerequisite: GEOG 225.

GEOG 394-L1  Advanced GIS for Health Lab
TBA TBA Ashley Nepp
 
GEOG 488-01  Transportation Geography
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith
 
GEOG 488-02  Migrants, Migration and the Global Landscape of Population Change
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Holly Barcus
 

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