Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

WGSS 100-01

Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes: This course is an introduction to the range and importance of 20th century as well as current feminist and queer theories and practices to our understanding of positive social change. It will analyze feminist and queer histories of resistance and alternatives to economic and political control, in the U.S. and elsewhere. The framework for the course is the intersection of gender and sexuality with race, class, nationality, and dis/ability; it will address such issues as economic marginalization, social movements, the institutions of family and marriage, migration and the role of the state/nation among others. Depending on the instructor, the course generally focuses on either LGBTQI studies or on transnational perspectives of these issues. (4 credits)

WGSS 117-01

Women, Health, Reproduction

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Elizabeth Jansen

Notes: Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

WGSS 240-01

Comparative Feminisms: Whiteness and Postcolonialisms

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: This course brings together discourses that have remained somewhat parallel and unrelated--Whiteness Studies and Postcolonial Studies. It is based on the premise that 'whiteness' as an academic/social framework stems from and is intertwined with social and political identity-based movements (feminist, critical race, etc.). In other words, studies of the intersection of gender, race, class, and nation initiated in the post-colonizing imagination seeks to shake up paradigms of power, and whiteness studies shares in this effort. This course explores where and how the notion of 'whiteness' converges and diverges from post-colonialism. (4 credits)

WGSS 261-01

Feminist Political Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Zornitsa Keremidchieva

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 261-01*

Analysis of contemporary feminist theories regarding gender identity, biological and socio-cultural influences on subjectivity and knowledge, and relations between the personal and the political. (4 credits). Cross-listed with Political Science 261.

WGSS 294-01

Queer Futures

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes:

WGSS 300-01

Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 300-01*

This course is an in-depth study of some specific theories and methodologies on which contemporary feminist and queer thinkers have based their analysis, critique, and reconstruction of men's and women's roles. Some guiding questions are: What is a Nation? Who are its citizens? How do language and gender roles shape the ways we imagine our roles as men and women? Do sexuality or economy affect how we subscribe to or resist political ideologies? In previous offerings, the course has explored the intersection of Postcolonialism (gendered critiques of colonizing sociopolitical and economic structures) with Postmodernism (gendered critiques of language, sexuality, culture, and nation). The course will include film, photography, music, and the writings of Butler, Foucault, Chodorow, Kristeva, hooks, Spivak, and Trinh, among others. It offers ways to create links with local community and social-work organizations. Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 200 highly recommended as prerequisite. (4 credits)

WGSS 305-01

Race, Sex and Work in the Global Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 305-01*

This seminar presents feminist and queer studies of global capitalism, which examine power relations under contemporary globalization in terms of the racial and sexual dynamics of labor, citizenship, and migration. Course material considers the local and transnational dynamics of free trade, labor fragmentation, and structural adjustment, as these shape industrial and informal labor, and community organizing around gender, sexuality, and HIV/AIDS. The material foregrounds ethnographic analyses of the everyday conditions of people situated in struggles with the effects of global capitalism. (4 credits)

WGSS 400-01

Senior Seminar: Linking Theory and Practice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: The relationship between academic theorizing and community organizing for positive social and political change is a vital, complex, and an ever-changing source of feminist inquiry. This course builds on that relationship by juxtaposing activist social work with theoretical writings on globalization, gender, race, class-relations, sexuality, community, democracy, and civil society, and exploring how these arenas inform and transform each other. The issues in this seminar are related ultimately to the student's "location," personally and professionally, at the threshold of the future, in search of a space of her/his own. One substantial research paper and a formal oral presentation on its ideas are the primary assignments. Preferred: a working relationship with a local women's or minority organization, established the spring or summer prior to enrollment in the course. (4 credits)


Fall 2016

WGSS 100-01

Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Benjamin Singer

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course is an introduction to the range and importance of 20th century as well as current feminist and queer theories and practices to our understanding of positive social change. It will analyze feminist and queer histories of resistance and alternatives to economic and political control, in the U.S. and elsewhere. The framework for the course is the intersection of gender and sexuality with race, class, nationality, and dis/ability; it will address such issues as economic marginalization, social movements, the institutions of family and marriage, migration and the role of the state/nation among others. Depending on the instructor, the course generally focuses on either LGBTQI studies or on transnational perspectives of these issues. (4 credits)

WGSS 100-02

Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Benjamin Singer

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course is an introduction to the range and importance of 20th century as well as current feminist and queer theories and practices to our understanding of positive social change. It will analyze feminist and queer histories of resistance and alternatives to economic and political control, in the U.S. and elsewhere. The framework for the course is the intersection of gender and sexuality with race, class, nationality, and dis/ability; it will address such issues as economic marginalization, social movements, the institutions of family and marriage, migration and the role of the state/nation among others. Depending on the instructor, the course generally focuses on either LGBTQI studies or on transnational perspectives of these issues. (4 credits)

WGSS 102-01

Gender and Sport

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes: This course views sport as a social institution and a microcosm of the longer social processes that stage, reinforce, and perpetuate myriad inequalities in society. In this course we analyze the gendered aspects of sport, and relationship among gender, sexuality, and sport. We consider the ways that sport reinforces, and potentially undermines, heteronormality, as well as hegemonic notions of masculinity and femininity. (4 credits)

WGSS 141-01

Latin America Through Women's Eyes

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and POLI 141-01*

Latin American women have overcome patriarchal "machismo" to serve as presidents, mayors, guerilla leaders, union organizers, artists, intellectuals, and human rights activists. Through a mix of theoretical, empirical, and testimonial work, we will explore issues such as feminist challenges to military rule in Chile, anti-feminist politics in Nicaragua, the intersection of gender and democratization in Cuba, and women's organizing and civil war in Colombia. Teaching methods include discussion, debates, simulations, analytic papers, partisan narratives, lecture, film, poetry, and a biographical essay. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-pressure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Cross-listed with Political Science 141 and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 141. (4 credits)

WGSS 200-01

Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Corie Hammers

Notes: This course is a historical survey of theories and methodologies used in feminist and queer studies. Course material highlights the unique and intertwined knowledges feminist and queer scholars have produced; these include the re-makings of liberal, Marxian, antiracist, poststructuralist, and postcolonial theories, and their uses in humanities and social science methods. The course centrally examines how feminist and queer studies transform societies and are transformed through struggle over their gender/sexual identities, racial formations, and global/transnational locations. The course considers how feminist and queer studies have arisen in close relationships¿of union, tension, and antagonism¿and how feminist and queer work today may link. (4 credits)


WGSS 264-01

The Psychology of Gender

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Anjali Dutt

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*

This class is an introduction to feminist psychological theory and research dedicated to understanding and critiquing biological, psychological, social, and cultural meanings and implications of gender and its intersections with class, race, physical ability, sexual orientation, etc. Examples of research and theory will come from a wide variety of areas in psychology and related disciplines, and will address such issues as socialization and social development, stereotypes, bodies and body image, social relationships, identity, language, violence, sexuality and sexual behavior, well-being, work, etc. We will also learn about the historical, cultural, and epistemological underpinnings of psychological research on gender. Counts as a UP3 course. Cross-listed with Psychology 264. (4 credits)


WGSS 294-02

19th C Russian Literature in Translation:Superfluous Men and Necessary Women

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Anastasia Kayiatos

Notes: *Cross-listed with RUSS 251-01* Fall semester topical theme: This survey course choreographs a sustained encounter with the nineteenth-century canon by following the footsteps of the "superfluous man" and his nimble partner, the necessary woman, who dance through Romanticism and Realism; bump into other “social types"; and animate the "accursed questions" bedeviling Russian culture back then. The syllabus also brushes up against a robust body of critical literature spanning century, country, genre and authorial gender. Waltzing between immanent and intertextual analysis with a WGSS spin, the class will come to grasp the state and stakes of the Russian novel from its debut to the present day.

WGSS 294-03

The Veil in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Susanna Drake

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 294-03* In this course, we will examine the role of the veil in societies from the ancient Near East to the present. We will pay special attention to veiling as a cultural and religious practice that reflects ideas about piety, gender, and status. Along with learning about the history of the veil and its use in some of the major religious traditions, we will consider the function of the veil in contemporary political debates, and we will explore women's veiling, in particular, as a topic in feminist discourse.


WGSS 294-04

Narrating African American Women's 20th Century Resistance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 294-04 and HIST 294-01* Using critical biographies of both well-known and lesser known African American women, this course will examine traditions of 20th century African American women’s activism, the ways in which they have changed over time, and also the interior lives of African Amercican women. Too often, the narrative of the “strong black woman” infuses stories of African American women’s resistance, which coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women’s activism. It also seeks to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. We will read biographies of African American women such as Ida B. Wells, Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Lacks, Ella Baker, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Florynce Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan, to name a few. Biographical reading will be coupled with primary sources, documentaries, and additional secondary sources to provide context.

WGSS 294-05

Muslim Women Writers

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 294-04 and INTL 294-02; counts for social science general distribution* Against the swirling backdrop of political discourses about women in the Islamic world, this course will engage with feminist and postcolonial debates through literary works by Muslim women writers. The course will begin with an exploration of key debates about women’s agency and freedom, the Islamic headscarf, and Qur’anic hermeneutics. With this in mind, we will turn to the fine details of literature and poetry by Muslim women. How do these authors constitute their worlds? How are gendered subjectivities constructed? And how do the gender politics of literary texts relate to the broader political and historical contexts from which they emerge? Themes will include an introduction to Muslim poetesses and Arabic poetic genres, the rise of the novel in the Arabic speaking world, and Muslim women’s literary production outside of the Middle East: from Senegal to South Asia, and beyond.

WGSS 294-06

Black Feminist Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Brittany Lewis

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 294-03* The aim of this course is to critically examine key issues, assumptions, and debates in the history and development of Black Feminist Thought in the United States. We will immerse ourselves in the writings and activisms of Black women who invoke Black womanhood as a position from which to speak otherwise concealed truths of power. We will analyze how Black women have resisted dominant cultures tendency to silence their voices through both their written work and the politics of mobilization as a way to bring themselves back into existence, often in response to such issues as racism, classism, sexism, and homophobia among other forms of systemic oppression.

The first section of the course will introduce students to Black feminist ways of knowing paying close attention to intersectionality as a concept and tool of analysis utilizing the scholarly works of historic Black feminist studies scholars such as bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins. Then we will focus our attention on the politics of pleasure and the art of naming oneself a “Black feminist” as contested issues within contemporary Black feminist studies scholarship through scholars such as Jennifer Nash, Evelyn Simien, and Nikol Alexander-Floyd. The second section of the course moves from debates within Black feminism to the politics of writing oneself back into existence as an act of Black feminist activism where Black women from the 19th to the 20th century are viewed as the producers of knowledge (fiction & non-fiction). The third section focuses on Black feminist politics from the 20th to the 21st Century, which aims to reiterate the importance of Black feminism as a contemporary political project not simply a theory of being in the world. This section will examine 1970s Black feminist organizing, Black women’s contemporary participation in national electoral politics, and the rise of Third Wave Black Feminism/Hip Hop Feminism through scholars such as Duchess Harris, Melissa Harris-Perry, Kimberly Springer, Brittany Lewis, and Joan Morgan.

WGSS 294-07

Girls' Manga: Gender/Sexuality in Japan through Popular Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Grace Ting

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02 and JAPA 294-01* This course is a brief survey of girls’ comics in Japan, also known as shōjo manga, largely produced for girls, by women. We will trace major historical trends in girls’ manga and culture, from around the 1910’s to the early 21st century. As the foundation for the class, we will read manga series to sample the wide range of style and content developed over the relatively brief history of manga, while developing a basic knowledge of major artists and the workings of the shōjo manga industry (magazines, reader-artist relationship). Along the way, we will also work on visual analysis skills and examine the relationship between style/technique, narratives, and identities. Short secondary readings will be assigned, largely specific to shōjo manga but also related to feminist theory, media studies, etc.

As a course on gender and sexuality, this course addresses the following: What is the significance of manga “for girls” in terms of content, readers, creators, etc.? How do these narratives and images take pleasure in / resist / reproduce / etc. various gender/sexual norms? Instead of judging texts as “good” or “bad,” our focus is to trace forms of desire found within shōjo manga—whether “guilty,” feminist, or more ambiguous—against the historical context of modern Japanese society. We will seek to challenge preconceptions about subjects & objects of desire and grasp forms of logic behind shocking or surprising depictions of sexualities. Please note that we will occasionally encounter graphic content involving depictions of sex and violence (e.g. sexual assault, rape), which will be discussed in class. (If you have any concerns, please speak with me ASAP, and we can consider whether the class is suitable for you or if you can complete an alternate assignment, etc.) In short, this class will push your ability to think, speak, and write (even draw) about gender and sexualities, as well as engage with popular cultural texts from a wider range of perspectives. A background in queer and feminist studies, Japan, and/or art is certainly welcome but not necessary.

WGSS 346-01

Constructions of a Female Killer

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 446-01 and LATI 446-01; first day attendance required*

The rise in femicide across Latin America, most shockingly exhibited in the city of Juarez, Mexico, has resulted in broad discussions of women's relationship with violence. However, what happens when the traditional paradigm is inverted and we explore women as perpetrators, rather than victims, of violence? This class will dialogue with selected Latin American and Latino narratives (including novels, short stories, films, and newspapers) constituting different representations of women who kill. This course satisfies the Area 4 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. Course crossed listed as Latin American Studies 446 and Hispanic Studies 446. (4 credits)

WGSS 354-01

Gender and Music

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MUSIC 228
  • Instructor: Victoria Malawey

Notes: *Cross-listed with MUSI 354-01*

This course explores issues concerning gender in a variety of American and European musical styles, with an emphasis on popular genres. Taking a topical approach, we will examine the ways in which gender is constructed in various musical contexts and explore the ways in which gender relates to and is informed by other apsects of identity formation, including class, race, and sexuality. We will investigate issues that have affected women's participation in musical life, such as musical canons, gendered musical discourse, and gender stereotypes. In addition, we will explore contributions of trans* musicians, as well as issues that affect their musical lives. We will also interrogate constructions of gender, masculinity, and femininity as they relate to music. An ongoing goal will be to develop reading comprehension and critical thinking skills through a series of short summary/response papers and discussion in class. Finally, as this course emphasizes writing and research skills, several class periods will be devoted to research techniques and the writing process, and accordingly you will be required to write and revise a substantial paper. Cross-listed with Music 354. (4 credits)