Class Schedules

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Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 5, 2016 at 04:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
WGSS 100-01  Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Sex, Gender and Social Worlds
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Benjamin Singer
This course is an introduction to the study of sex and gender in a transnational world, emphasizing how they are embedded in dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, nationality and ability. We begin by deconstructing the “naturalness” of sex and gender and then look at histories of science; the invention of the modern nation-state; nationalism, colonialism and imperialism; contemporary processes of globalization; and feminist activisms within and beyond identity politics. Students will develop skill in using methods for critiquing dualistic conceptualizations of sex and gender, as well as understanding gender, sexuality and other forms of personhood as historically and culturally specific. Sex, Gender and Social Worlds insists that identity and embodiment cannot be understood as isolated from histories of colonialism, circuits of mobility, and capitalist production and exchange. The readings reflect various disciplinary voices that enable students to become critical readers of theoretical, legal, medical, historical, ethnographic, filmic and activist texts. Social Science general distribution.

WGSS 100-02  Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Sex, Gender and Social Worlds
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 228 Benjamin Singer
This course is an introduction to the study of sex and gender in a transnational world, emphasizing how they are embedded in dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, nationality and ability. We begin by deconstructing the “naturalness” of sex and gender and then look at histories of science; the invention of the modern nation-state; nationalism, colonialism and imperialism; contemporary processes of globalization; and feminist activisms within and beyond identity politics. Students will develop skill in using methods for critiquing dualistic conceptualizations of sex and gender, as well as understanding gender, sexuality and other forms of personhood as historically and culturally specific. Sex, Gender and Social Worlds insists that identity and embodiment cannot be understood as isolated from histories of colonialism, circuits of mobility, and capitalist production and exchange. The readings reflect various disciplinary voices that enable students to become critical readers of theoretical, legal, medical, historical, ethnographic, filmic and activist texts. Social Science general distribution.

WGSS 117-01  Women, Health, Reproduction
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Elizabeth Jansen
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with BIOL 117-01* This course deals with topics in human anatomy and physiology of special interest to women, especially those relating to sexuality and reproduction. The biology of menstruation, sexuality, pregnancy, contraception, infertility, abortion, menopause, cancer, and HIV/AIDS, plus advances in reproductive technologies and genetic engineering, prepare a foundation for discussion of sociocultural, ethical and legal considerations.

WGSS 127-01  Wom/Gend/Sex Greece/Rome
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Beth Severy-Hoven
*Cross-listed with CLAS 127-01*

WGSS 194-01  Minding the Body
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Kayiatos, Ostrove
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PSYC 194-01 and RUSS 194-01* This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the body primarily from the perspectives of psychology, disability studies, and feminist studies, with a strategically split focus primarily on the United States and Russia/Eastern Europe. We will rely on analysis of theoretical and empirical research, personal narrative, and film to explore such questions as: What is a “normal” body? A “beautiful” body? How does the media inform how we feel about our bodies? How are bodies – especially women’s bodies – objectified, exploited, commodified, and regulated? How and why do we discriminate against people with non-normative bodies? How do people represent the experience of having a disabled body? How can we think critically about the various ways in which people change, regulate, and enhance their bodies (e.g., via body building, cosmetic surgery, diet, etc.)? How do sexism, racism, classism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression influence how different bodies are viewed, treated, educated, and experienced? And how does all this change when we travel in time or across space?

The course’s cross-listing with Russian Studies will give students a comparative context for thinking about how the body is built – and minded – differently depending on cultural, political, and economic considerations. This will be a writing-intensive course in which students will write (and re-write) personal essays, analytical and reflective essays, and a research paper.



WGSS 200-01  Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
We will study how the terms 'feminist' and 'queer' meet and separate in 20th century culture and politics. Some themes that bring them into the same conversation are: negotiating prescribed and constructed identities, critiquing existing frameworks and fashioning unprecedented ones, and addressing the material conditions of modernity and postmodernity. Some issues we will discuss: struggles for rights, cultural and political representation of gendered, racialized and sexualized minorities, visions of new societies. Some authors we will study: Sojourner Truth, Vandana Shiva, bell hooks, Betty Friedan, Rebecca Walker, Trinh Minh-ha, Martin Manalansan, Naomi Klein, among others. No prerequisites.

WGSS 220-01  Feminist Re-Constructions: Indian
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-05* A historical accident has led to the creation and use of ‘Indian’ in very different geographies—North America and South Asia. We will study what happens when these diverse cultural and political depictions of ‘Indian’ are juxtaposed. Through an intersection of gender with nation, race, class, and sexuality, we will discuss the connections between the concepts of native, ancient, and modern, nation and citizenship, hyphenated and hybrid identities, global cultural consumption, to name some issues. The course will include authors across the 20th century into the present—for example, Zitkala Sa, R.K. Narayan, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Anita Desai, Simon Ortiz, Sherman Alexie, Mulk Raj Anand, Louise Erdrich, nila northSun, Meena Kandasamy, among others. Art, film, and political expressions will be part of the matrix of analysis. No prerequisites.

WGSS 264-01  The Psychology of Gender
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 243 Jessica Salvatore
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*

WGSS 294-01  Gender and Sexuality in China
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 112 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with CHIN 294-01*

WGSS 294-02  Sex and Citizenship: 19th Century U.S. Women's Writing
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Jean Franzino
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-03; no prerequisites*

WGSS 294-03  Race, Class, and Gender in American Photography
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02 and ART 294-03*

WGSS 494-01  Text and Identity: Parisiennes
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 216 Juliette Rogers
*Cross-listed with FREN 412-01; first day attendance required*

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 5, 2016 at 04:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
WGSS 100-01  Introduction to Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Benjamin Singer
*First day attendance required*

WGSS 117-01  Women, Health, Reproduction
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 4th with permission of the instructor*

WGSS 194-01  Of Sex and Society: Women's History and Feminist Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Amy Sullivan
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-01* This course will provide students with a thorough knowledge of women’s and gender history in the United States from the late 18th century to the early 21st century. What ideas did early feminist thinkers have about liberty, justice, and equality? How has feminist and LGBT activism shaped laws, culture, and society? How has feminism been constructed over time? Is it possible to be a feminist without knowing women’s history and without asking historical questions? We will study the outcome of women's political action as well as the history of thinking undertaken by many important, and perhaps previously unknown, historically important leaders.

WGSS 252-01  Gender, Sexualities and Feminist Visual Culture
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 252-01*

WGSS 262-01  Performing Feminisms
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Beth Cleary
*Cross-listed with THDA 262-01; course open to all*

WGSS 264-01  The Psychology of Gender
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*

WGSS 294-01  Queer Cinema
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Karisa Butler-Wall
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-03* What is the relation between queer theory and cinema? What are queer filmmaking and viewing practices? What does it mean to “queer” cinema? This course investigates the queer potential and possibilities within cinema through an examination of specific social and political movements, theoretical and aesthetic traditions, filmmaking technologies, and reading practices. We will ask how cinema mediates relationships among queer identities, politics, and aesthetics. Queer cinema is deeply tied to the life experiences of gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, and other queer-identified people, yet as a genre, “queer cinema” goes beyond merely representing GLBT lives and identities. This course focuses on cinema itself as a queer critical praxis that envisions new ways of being in the world. Rather than viewing gender and sexuality as preexisting identity categories, we will discuss how queer subjects are (in)formed and negotiated through film production and viewing practices. By focusing on particular historical and cultural moments, geographical spaces, and political contexts in which queer cinema has emerged, this course will explore how queer filmmaking and viewing practices do not simply reflect social and political realities but actively shape them. Throughout the course, we will consider how films themselves contribute to and intervene in queer and feminist scholarship. This course presumes no prior experience in either queer studies or film studies. We will draw on interdisciplinary perspectives across a number of fields to explore topics such as queer spectatorship, film noir, racial representation and in/visibility, intersectionality, diaspora, citizenship, neoliberalism, AIDS activism, disability, camp, futurity, and queer dystopias and utopias. By focusing on how films themselves contribute to and intervene in queer and feminist scholarship, we will consider queer cinema as both an engagement with the reality of the world and a method for imagining new, transformative possibilities.

WGSS 294-02  Gender and Sexuality in Transnational Contexts
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Benjamin Singer
This course is an introduction to the study of gender, sexuality, race, nation and empire in an age of globalization whereby the uneven circulation of ideas, goods, people and capital around the globe both enables and constrains the prospects for human and environmental flourishing. Interdisciplinary in scope, this course will trace how feminist and/or queer ideas and practices travel both within and across national, political, economic, cultural, racial, gendered, sexual, religious and disciplinary borders. It also considers the ways in which these ideas are implicated in processes of colonization. This course concludes with a meditation on alternative visions of a more just world that a transnational politics of genders, sexualities, and feminisms might articulate. Prerequisite: WGSS 100 or permission of instructor.

WGSS 294-04  The Cold War Gets Hot: Sex and Gender in First and Second World Literatures
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01*

WGSS 294-05  Silent Subjects
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-02*

WGSS 300-01  Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Benjamin Singer
*Cross-listed with INTL 300-01*

WGSS 364-01  Lives in Context
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with PSYC 364-01*

WGSS 394-02  Race, Gender, and Medicine
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Amy Sullivan
*Cross-listed with HIST 350-01* This seminar-style class examines the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in the history of medicine and health in the U.S. Our diverse topics for study include eugenics, sexuality, midwifery, cultural/spiritual healing methods, pandemics, race- and gender-based ailments and medical experiments (such as the science and politics of the birth control pill and the infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment), gender reassignment surgery, and sex-testing in the Olympics. This wide range of topics will prepare students to explore a research topic of their own choosing for a final paper.

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