Course Descriptions

French

FREN 101 - French I

Emphasizing the active use of the language, this course develops the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It includes an introduction to the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Class sessions are supplemented by weekly small group meetings with a French graduate assistant. For students with no previous work in French. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every fall.

FREN 102 - French II

This course continues the development of the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with increasing emphasis on the practice of reading and writing. It includes introduction to the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Class sessions are supplemented by weekly small group meetings with a French graduate assistant. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 101 with a grade of C- or better, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 111 - Accelerated French I-II

This course develops fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It includes introduction to the cultural background of France and the francophone world. It is designed for students who have had some French prior to enrolling at Macalester or who want to review basic structures. The course prepares students for French III and includes two lab. Sessions. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

FREN 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

FREN 203 - French III

The aim of this course is to bring students to a point where they can use French for communication, both oral and written. At the end of this course students should be able to read appropriate authentic materials, write short papers in French and communicate with a native speaker. It consolidates and builds competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing and includes study of the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Class sessions are supplemented by weekly small group meetings with a French graduate assistant. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 102 or FREN 111 with a grade of C- or better, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 204 - Text, Film and Media

This course presents a study of the contemporary language and culture of France and the Francophone world through authentic materials including the French press, the internet, television, literature and film. At the end of this course students should have attained a more sophisticated level of communication in French, the ability to use their skills in French for a variety of purposes including research in other disciplines, and a full appreciation of the intellectual challenge of learning a foreign language and its cultures. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 203 with a grade of C- or better, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

FREN 305 - Advanced Expression: Communication Tools

This course is an intensive training in oral expression and corrective phonetics. Materials include news broadcasts from French TV, films and articles from the French and Francophone press. Grammar patterns that enhance communication will be studied. Class sessions are supplemented by small group meetings with French assistants and small conversation groups with Francophone tutors. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 306 - Introduction to Literary Analysis

This course is designed to develop the necessary skills for interpreting literature and for writing effectively in French. Students learn to do close reading and analysis of a variety of literary works and to compose critical essays. The course also includes a study of selected grammatical patterns and stylistic techniques. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204 or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 307 - French Culture

This course, regardless of topic, is ideal for students planning to spend time in France, for students who want to include the study of France in various disciplines, from a cultural rather than an intermediary-advanced level.

Culture Française: La civilisation française en évolution from Lascaux to 1789: This course traces the cultural, philosophical, literary and sociological works and movements that move France from the early period of Lascaux to the French revolution 1789. It explores the multi-facets of each century through 1789. The reading list includes early documents on Lascaux, Charlemagne, Jeanne d'Arc, Cahterine de Médicis, Rabelais, Montaigne, Descartes, Me de Scudéry, the diaries of Louis XIV, Voltaire, Diderot, movies on French Revolution and French art from the early period to 1789. Taught in French. Offered alternative years.

La France contemporaine: histoire, culture et actualité: This course is designed for students who want to understand contemporary events and issues in France. The course includes a review of essential historical events that have shaped modern France, in particular the legacy of the French Revolution, the colonial empire, WWII and the French-Algerian War. These events have shaped all contemporary debates (i.e. the recent law regarding wearing religious symbols in schools, the October 2005 suburb riots, recent immigration laws, and many other topics). The course also studies the place of France in relationship with the United States and the European community. Some units focus on the production of French culture and various intellectual/artistic movements through a variety of up-to-date authentic materials: newspaper articles, films, ATV news, websites. Taught in French. Offered alternative years.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204 or FREN 305. This course in not open to students who have already completed FREN 306 or high level courses in French

FREN 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

FREN 407 - Francophone Studies

This course category encompasses the study of cultures and literatures from the French-speaking regions and countries outside of France. It includes such recent courses as:

Voix du Nord - Quebec et les autres: Québec is uniquely situated in the world: at a crossroads between European and North American cultures, a French-speaking province surrounded by English-speaking nations, and historically both connected and disconnected from its indigenous populations. It has also recently been a destination for émigrés from all over the world. This course examines the distinctive multicultural dimensions of the francophone province of Québec and its interactions with "les autres" (other cultures and peoples), through a study of recent literature published over the past 30 years. We begin with a brief overview of the history of Québec's multicultural identity, from the colonial era through the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s and up to 21st-century Quebec, including the 2012 assassination attempt on the new prime minister and the 2008 debates over the "reasonable accommodation" law that shocked the nation. The second section proceeds with an analysis of three of Québec's strongest cultural partners: the heritage of the French, the influence of the U.S., and the complicated interactions with First Nations. The third section of the course focuses on the relationships between Québécois "de souche" (citizens of French or British heritage) and recent immigrants. The texts and films studied in this section include characters originally from China, Haïti, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, and other countries around the world. We examine why they moved to Québec, why they chose French as their principal language of expression, and how they interpret their new homeland. Throughout the course, we explore issues of language, identity, exile, and memory to understand the complex negotiations between inhabitants of "la belle province." Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 306 or permission of instructor.

Les Voix du Sud: This course is an introduction to francophone literature––specifically that of the sub-Saharan region––through literary, cultural, and political issues. By drawing from African text (poetry, theater, novels, and essays) and film, the course seeks to retrace several significant periods that have influenced African francophone literature to this day. The course will focus on four key axes: The first axis is that of "traditional African oral literature" from the pre-colonial period and the translation of these oral works into French. We begin by visiting pre-colonial "oral" literature and its transcription into French translations by discussing the concept of literature in its relationship to the written and the oral, as well as the relationship of the author and the translator. The second axis explores from the beginnings of a "written" literature until the 1950s based on the revaluation of traditional African cultures and a critique of colonization. This angle will essentially be organized around works of negritude and its critique. The third axis is the "disenchantment" of African independence and the denunciation of African dictators. This aspect covers works from the 1960s to the 1980s. Finally, the fourth axis, from the 1990s to the present, is studied from two orientations: francophone literature from the African diaspora––"migritude"––and post-genocide literature. In addition to African films and several excerpts from texts, we study Le Pauvre Christ de Bomba by Mongo Beti, Le soleil des Indépendances by Kourouma, Le ventre d'Atlantique by Fatou Diome, and Murambi by Boris Diop. We invite writers and specialists in francophone African literature. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 306 or permission of instructor.

Francophone Studies: Haiti: Haiti is the first Black Republic in the Western Hemisphere, it is the first island that Christopher Columbus colonized, it is also the first country to defeat the troops of Napoleon, an event that precipitated the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. In short, it is an important place to study as it is connected to North and South America, the Caribbean, France and other European countries, and the African continent. In this course, we will study the history of Haiti since pre-colonial times, through historical documents, history analysis and political documents and analysis from the colonial period to current events in Haiti. We will also examine the place of Haiti in relation to globalization, and its economy and how it went from practically supporting more than half of the French economy in the 17th-century to being the poorest nation in the western hemisphere. Haiti is one of the most productive places in terms of culture: paintings, literature, music, etc. The course emphasizes the introduction to Haitian culture with the study of its religions, languages and cultural productions. We will listen to various music that developed throughout history in Haiti. Taught in French.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 or permission of the instructor.

FREN 408 - French Cultural Studies

A survey of cultural issues in France. The themes studied in this course include definitions of nation, culture, tradition and modernity and change in social, cultural, aesthetic and intellectual structures as well as immigration and diversity in France. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.  French Cultural Studies: Literature and Cinema of Immigration Literature and Cinema of Immigration explores the diversity of France through its immigrant population. After studying and discussing the history and composition of immigration in France, students look at cultural productions, especially literature, films, music and art as well as documentation about contemporary issues in French society associated with immigration. The course includes various cities in France (Marseilles, Lyon, and Paris as well as their suburbs), and contextualizes the current situation regarding French and European laws, as well as various types of housing in connection with immigration. The course takes into account gender, class, religion, culture, and race issues as well as language issues. Materials include statistics, essays, video-conferences, images, film, music, fiction literature, maps, and internet and web-based resources. Readings include materials about the first immigrants to France, the colonial immigrants such as the Tirailleurs Sénégalais and their descendants, how the French colonies in North Africa and the French-Algerian war affected immigration in France, and what are the legacies of French imperialism for French multiculturalism as well as some recent works by Congolese, Algerian, Vietnamese, Caribbean writers. Films include documentaries on immigration and fiction films from Thé au harem d'Archi Ahmed, to Entre les murs. Music includes rap, slam, and raï. The course is taught in French. (Offered next in 2013) French Intellectuals in/and the World: Critical Tools for Critical Minds, Literature and Engagement This seminar presents an overview of French culture, theory and philosophy from the Middle Ages to today. It focuses on how French intellectuals have engaged across time with issues such as gender, class, race, language, and the public and the private, among other issues. The course studies how French intellectuals use their critical thinking, and theoretical and creative writing to propose ideas, take ethical positions (or not), and through writing and acting, engage in solidarity work. Readings include Christine de Pizan on the role of intellectual women in the public sphere, Montaigne on colonialism, Pascal and Descartes on religion and science, Voltaire and Beccaria on torture and prisons, Michel Foucault on enlightenment, Victor Hugo on capital punishment, Pierre Bourdieu on "the organic intellectual" and more recent notions of commitment and civic engagement with war and peace, immigration, and postcolonial cultural history through the works of various contemporary artists, writers, and public intellectuals such as André Breton, Jean-Paul Sartre, Michel Foucault, Assia Djebar and Boubacar Boris Diop. Taught in French.  

Frequency: Offered next in 2015.

Prerequisite(s)

One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 409 - Cinema

This category introduces students to French or Francophone cinema, dealing with history, theory, and condition of production of this media. Prerequisite: a 300 level course or permission of instructor. Alternate years.   It includes such courses as: North Africa/France: Representations of Both Sides of the Mediterranean Through Cinema Survey of the historical and soci-economic contexts of North African Cinema (in Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia). The course examines representations of the colonial period (with texts, paintings, photographs, and critical material on orientalism and early cinema in the region), the French-Algerian war from various perspectives, and the national/post-colonial film production in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, all the way to the current cinema made after the January 2011 Revolution. The course also includes films by and about North Africans in France. Materials for the course include films as well as theoretical and critical materials about the regional cinema and film directors.

Prerequisite(s)

One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 410 - Art/Ideas in French Culture

The course studies the arts of France (art, architecture, music and literature) in their historical and intellectual settings. Topics and historical periods studied vary by semester. Taught in French unless otherwise noted.   Arts and Ideas in Contemporary France This course will provide a chronological exposure to the prevailing trends and characteristics of the visual arts (paintings, sculptures, installations) in France with a special attention given to the highly politicized 60's and 70's. Through the use of films, slides, French web art sites and critical essays, these works will be studied and problematized from a sociological, political and cultural perspective.   Attention also will be given to the not-so-new notion of "francité" embedded in France's unique "politique nationale culturelle" as well as other contemporary visual art practices which strive to reflect an increasingly pluralistic French society.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 411 - Challenges of Modernity/Lit

Introduction to the study and the context of French literary and artistic masterpieces from the 12th to the 21st century, with special focus on their ties with contemporary "mentalités" and events. The significance of specific works for audiences of their time will be extended to the study of their influence in subsequent centuries, including the 20th/21st. Particular attention will be paid also to our own representation and use of these past centuries in diverse contemporary media, such as films and advertisements. The thematic emphasis of the class, as well as the historical period, may vary by semester. Taught in French unless otherwise noted.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 or permission of the instructor.

FREN 412 - Text and Identity

This category of courses introduces students to texts (including films) that engage students to focus on questions of identity(national, sexual, racial, and class identity) through the study of literature and film. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. It includes such courses as: Parisiennes: Women of Paris In this course we examine the lives of "Parisiennes" - women who have lived in or come from the city of Paris from 1730 to the present. We begin with the powerful salonnières of the aristocratic 18th century, intersections of sexism, racism, and colonialism, and the peasant women's march on Versailles during the French Revolution of 1789. For the 19th century, we examine women's roles during the industrial revolution and the modernization of Paris, and the activists of the first wave of French feminism. In the first half of the 20th-century, we study women artists and writers in Paris, including some Americans who lived in Paris during that time. For the second half of the 20th century, we look at changing roles for Parisian women, including the second wave of French feminism, women in politics, and the changing attitudes toward women in French law and society during the 1970s and later. Readings include Claire de Duras' Ourika (1823), Colette's La Vagabonde (1910), excerpts of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex (1949), and Christiane Rochefort's Children of Heaven (1962). We also study recent works by francophone women writers living in Paris today, and view several recent films that focus on the lives of Parisian women.    

Frequency: Offered next in 2014.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 or permission of instructor.

FREN 413 - Studies in Theory

This category of courses includes courses that prepare students to read textual and/or visual materials through various theoretical lenses. Courses include Feminist French Theory, French Intellectuals in/and the World (cross-listed with Humanities, Media and Cultural Studies), or courses dealing with particular literary, cultural, or critical theories. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 when courses are offered in French or permission of the instructor.

FREN 414 - Studies in Genre

Courses on the novel, theatre, poetry, and short stories, are offered in this category. Courses may be surveys of the development of a genre across the centuries or they may focus on a particular period.  ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 or permission of the instructor.

FREN 415 - Literary Periods and Movements

This course category encompasses the study of literature in various literary periods and/or movements. Such courses may alternate every year and include: Resistance and Revolution in 18th-century France Eighteenth-century France is a period characterized by vigorous literary and philosophical challenges to traditional authority and its institutions, although the events of 1789 were not anticipated by most of the leading thinkers of the period, and the notion that the Revolution was the necessary outcome of their challenges has often been viewed as a retrospective historical illusion. In this course we examine intellectual challenges to traditional authority during the final decades of the ancien régime in three primary areas: the domain of politics and the state; the domain of religion and the church; and the domain of gender, sexuality and the family. The course culminates with a discussion of some key revolutionary ideas and manifestos, and a review of the legacy of French Enlightenment thought and its advances and limits, in dialogue with contemporary critical and theoretical perspectives. Themes to be discussed include despotism and democracy, freedom and equality, nature and culture, tolerance and fanaticism, deism and natural religion, atheism and materialism, education, sex and libertinage. Readings include selections from the Encyclopédie and from works by Rousseau, Montesquieu, Beaumarchais, De Gouges, Voltaire, Sade, Vivant Denon, Diderot, D'Holbach and La Mettrie Money and the Marketplace in 19th century French Literature French culture and society witnessed vast changes in both traditional structures and values during the 19th century, due to the influence of the industrial revolution and the rise of capitalism. This course offers a survey of 19th century French literature (novels, play, short stories, and poetry) linked to the theme of the course, money and the marketplace. We examine the different roles and uses of money in the literary texts of the course, including works by Balzac, Flaubert, Hugo, and Zola, and we identify some of the many 19th-century characters connected with different aspects of money: the banker, the notary, the lender, the speculator, the industrialist, the inheritor, the bankrupt, the criminal, the gambler, the artist, the young girl with/without dowry, the poor, etc. We try to understand in what respects literature itself had become an object for purchase linked to the marketplace, and, finally, we explore the question of whether or not there exists a relationship between money and the key 19th-century literary movements and styles (Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism). 20th-century Literature and Cinema: The Century of Ruptures and Sutures: The Avant-Garde(s) The course will expose students to some of the most important writers, poets, playwrights, and thinkers of the twentieth-century. It will serve both as a survey of the most important literary, artistic, and intellectual movements and as a sampling of the most brilliant and innovative prose, poetry, and performance. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with some of the cultural productions that have been strongly influenced by scientific, linguistic, psychoanalytical, colonial, anti-colonial, post-colonial, racial, and gender-based theories of the century. Virtually all literary and artistic genres were affected by the ruptures caused by various wars. Academic rules were subverted, and new forms of expression emerged - several times. Moving images were but one of the technological inventions that allowed people to attempt to restore their identities, national and individual. Through the study of Surrealism, the use of social realism narratives, the Absurd, Negritude, Existentialism, the New Wave and the New Novel, structuralism, post-structuralism and deconstruction, the impact of feminism on language, the course will expose students to readings of texts and images that represent the long lasting effects of the twentieth-century ruptures on writers and artists.    

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 - Introduction to Literary Analysis or permission of instructor.

FREN 416 - French Interdisciplinary Studies

This category of courses is offered by faculty from the French and Francophone Studies department as well as from other departments and concentrations. Courses are taught in English and focus on topics relevant to the French and Francophone world, with a multidirectional dimension that accommodates approaches and contributions from other departments and concentrations.  Religions in Africa: Cultural Identity and Social Transformation Offered Fall 2013 Religion is a major component of African cultural heritage, which is one reason why certain researchers estimate that the dichotomy between the sacred and the profane did not exist in ancient Africa. If it is true that traditional African religion, said to be natural, is tied up in African traditions, the incursion of other religions (Christianity and Islam) into Africa drove a reconsideration of certain African cultural practices. Despite efforts to "enculturate" religion, this contact remains a challenge to define the culture and identity of a people. Christianity and Islam define their values, their norms and have imposed them on African societies. Religions engage in development, but they also divide ethnic and national communities that were once unified. What is it that therefore defines an African cultural heritage? How do we define a national or ethnic identity that combines multiple religions with "alien features?" What role can traditional African religion play today in a modern and mutating society? Many African novels have depicted the relationships between Islam, Christianity and African cultural heritage. African theology too has marked the way for a dialogue between African cultures/ traditional religion and Christianity in particular. This course will organize itself around readings from both Francophone African literature and African theology as well as around some African films, including works by Cheikh Hamidou Kane, V.Y. Mudimbe, Sembene Ousmane, and Jean-Marc Ela. Towards a Postcolonial Pacific: Contemporary Literature from Aotearoa/New Zealand, French Polynesia and Hawai'i This course is a comparative introduction to postcolonial literature (and some film) from the Pacific region, in particular from the so-called "Polynesian Triangle." The course examines recent works by major literary figures through a postcolonial prism, and focuses on literary representations of the political and social legacy of colonialism in these territories. For each country studied, we begin with a brief historical review of colonization in dialogue with a text written by a colonial visitor or settler. We then examine resistance to dominant colonialist discourse in the works of prominent contemporary "indigenous" authors, in dialogue with current political debates in each territory. Course themes include differing conceptions of race, ethnicity and indigeneity in each country, and their relation to the histories of British, French and U.S. imperialism in the Pacific; the rise of indigenous nationalist movements, and the question as to whether political independence defined in ethnic terms remains a feasible goal in an era of globalization; questions of language in a Pacific space still dominated by its colonial division into distinct "Anglonesian" and "Franconesian" spheres; and the island as a unit of political organization as opposed to alternative pan-Oceanic conceptions of inter-relation. Authors studied include Katherine Mansfield; Patricia Grace; Witi Ihimaera; Victor Segalen; Chantal Spitz; Célestine Vaite; Herman Melville;Mark Twian; Lee Cataluna; Lois-Ann Yamanaka. (Offered next in 2014) Haiti: Culture, Human Rights, and Humanitarianism The January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, that killed more than 250,000 people, brought a lot of attention to the country traditionally described as "the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere." This course aims to provide students interested in humanitarianism, human rights, the Caribbean, cultural studies, and French and Francophone Studies an introduction to Haiti and Haitian culture throughout its history, including pre-and post-earthquake culture. It also aims at providing a thoughtful critical frame to the extraordinary humanitarian situation after the earthquake and the responses it generated at the Haitian and international levels. Throughout the course, students will become more familiar with Haitian history, its rich cultural production, and the relevance of culture to human rights representations, abuses, and responses to abuses as well as its relevance to various humanitarian crises in Haiti, especially the post-earthquake daily situation. Students will also gain knowledge about Haitian society, local organizations working in human rights and humanitarianism, the geography of Human Rights, local IDP environment, and humanitarian distribution of resources, and they will acquire the critical tools necessary to understand, assess, and participate in the current debates about human rights and humanitarianism practices in Haiti (including issues related to health, gender, economic rights, education, and access to resources of any kind). This course will be taught in English. Students taking it for credit counting toward the French major or Minor will be able to read some of the material and conduct their research in French. Students interested in doing an internship with one of the many organizations in the Twin Cities linked with Haiti should speak to the instructor. Approved for use on the Human Rights and Humanitarianism concentration. The Animal and the Human in the French Enlightenment At stake in today's debates over the relations between animals and humans lie fundamental questions concerning what it means to be human as well as our obligations to the animal world and to nature. Contemporary thinkers including Singer, Derrida, de Fontenay and Agamben have often sought to reconsider or even denounce the Enlightenment legacy on these questions, usually emblematized by René Descartes' conception of "animal-machines." Yet there is no single perspective on the relations between animals and humans in the period and, as today, the animal/human distinction lies at the center of controversial discussions in philosophy, literature and the natural and social sciences. Unlike today, however, when we usually consider animals in the context of animal rights and welfare issues, in pre-revolutionary France the animal/human distinction is perceived as having immediate implications for human moral and political values and prospects for social and political reform. The course will explore the moral and political significance attributed to the animal/human distinction in selected philosophical, literary and scientific texts exemplifying the principal strands of French Enlightenment discourse. Readings include Descartes, La Mettrie, Diderot, Rousseau, Condillac, and Buffon, as well as some contemporary theory. Course themes include reason and the passions, primitivism, sex, bestiality, justice, responsibility, cruelty, and punishment.    

FREN 488 - Senior Seminar

The course is intended primarily for advanced students who have studied in a French-speaking country, and is a requirement for all majors. The themes and theoretical approaches of the seminar will vary depending on the faculty teaching the course.   ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Recent offerings have included: Child Soldiers through Texts and Films, Quebec and Others, De l'extrême-orient aux antipodes: représentations francophones de l'Asie et du Pacifique, and The Animal and the Human in the French Enlightenment.

Prerequisite(s)

One 300 level course is required depending on content of French 494.

FREN 601 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 602 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 603 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 604 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 611 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 612 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 613 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 614 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 621 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 622 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 623 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 624 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 631 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 632 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 633 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 634 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 641 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 642 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 643 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 644 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.