French

FREN 101 - French I

Emphasizing the active use of the language, this course develops the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It includes an introduction to the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Class sessions are supplemented by weekly small group meetings with a French graduate assistant. For students with no previous work in French. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every fall.

FREN 102 - French II

This course continues the development of the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with increasing emphasis on the practice of reading and writing. It includes introduction to the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Class sessions are supplemented by weekly small group meetings with a French graduate assistant. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 101 with a grade of C- or better, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 111 - Accelerated French I-II

This course develops fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It includes introduction to the cultural background of France and the francophone world. It is designed for students who have had some French prior to enrolling at Macalester or who want to review basic structures. The course prepares students for French III and includes two lab. Sessions. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

FREN 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

FREN 203 - French III

The aim of this course is to bring students to a point where they can use French for communication, both oral and written. At the end of this course students should be able to read appropriate authentic materials, write short papers in French and communicate with a native speaker. It consolidates and builds competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing and includes study of the cultural background of France and the Francophone world. Class sessions are supplemented by weekly small group meetings with a French graduate assistant. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 102 or FREN 111 with a grade of C- or better, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 204 - Text, Film and Media

This course presents a study of the contemporary language and culture of France and the Francophone world through authentic materials including the French press, the internet, television, literature and film. At the end of this course students should have attained a more sophisticated level of communication in French, the ability to use their skills in French for a variety of purposes including research in other disciplines, and a full appreciation of the intellectual challenge of learning a foreign language and its cultures. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 203 with a grade of C- or better, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

FREN 305 - Advanced Expression: Communication Tools

This course is an intensive training in oral expression and corrective phonetics. Materials include news broadcasts from French TV, films and articles from the French and Francophone press. Grammar patterns that enhance communication will be studied. Class sessions are supplemented by small group meetings with French assistants and small conversation groups with Francophone tutors. Taught in French.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 306 - Introduction to Literary Analysis

This course is designed to develop the necessary skills for interpreting literature and for writing effectively in French. Students learn to do close reading and analysis of a variety of literary works and to compose critical essays. The course also includes a study of selected grammatical patterns and stylistic techniques. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204 or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 308 - From Lascaux to 1789: The Evolution of French Civilization

This course traces the cultural, philosophical, literary and sociological works and movements that move France from the early period of Lascaux to the French revolution 1789. It explores the multi-facets of each century through 1789. The reading list includes early documents on Lascaux, Charlemagne, Jeanne d'Arc, Catherine de Médicis, Rabelais, Montaigne, Descartes, Me de Scudéry, the diaries of Louis XIV, Voltaire, Diderot, movies on French Revolution and French art from the early period to 1789. Taught in French.  

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204 is required. This course in not open to students who have already completed FREN 306 or high level courses in French.

FREN 309 - Contemporary France: History, Culture and Current Events

This course is designed for students who want to understand contemporary events and issues in France. The course includes a review of essential historical events that have shaped modern France, in particular the legacy of the French Revolution, the colonial empire, WWII and the French-Algerian War. These events have shaped all contemporary debates (i.e. the recent law regarding wearing religious symbols in schools, the October 2005 suburb riots, recent immigration laws, and many other topics). The course also studies the place of France in relationship with the United States and the European community. Some units focus on the production of French culture and various intellectual/artistic movements through a variety of up-to-date authentic materials: newspaper articles, films, ATV news, websites. Taught in French.
 

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204 required. This course in not open to students who have already completed FREN 306 or high level courses in French.

FREN 310 - Passerelles: Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

This course is a topics course designed to introduce students to the diversity of French and Francophone Cultures. Through the means of diverse medias: images, music, films, and texts, students will engage with different approaches to the cultural productions of several areas. The course includes aspects of French culture as well to cover how France and the Francophone World engage with each other.  Units will include: The transformations of Paris (May 1968, immigration, Paris and its periphery); The Tunisian Revolutions (from one Tunisia to the next); West Africa (modern cultures; emigration; riches); Central Africa (identity; languages; survival); Algeria (web documentaries on several generations, gender, rural/urban); Morocco (youth, tales of women, performances of human rights); Island multiculturalism (Mauritius cosmopolitanism, Caribbean diversity, Haitian riches, French Polynesian artists, Madagascar youth and history); Quebec (identity; language; diversity). The course will be conducted as a seminar. The goals of the course are to introduce students to a rich cultural transnational world in multiple relations with France, French language, changed by this relation and changing France and French as well, through various media. Films will be screened out of class. Taught in French.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 204 

FREN 320 - Francophone Theater of Exile and Immigration

This course is a survey of francophone theater and film from 1975 to 2014. The plays and films will cover three main topics: the development of colonial and post-colonial subjects, the act of writing and performing while living in exile, and the idea of the Other in francophone film and theater. We will study a variety of plays and films that were written in and take place in all parts of the francophone world, including Quebec, Lebanon, Algeria, Belgium, Cameroon, Senegal, Mali, Martinique, Romania, and France. The form of each work varies widely, from classical French dramatic techniques to minimalist contemporary staging and characterization. Students will study blocking and staging techniques and explore contemporary performance theory in addition to writing literary and cultural analyses. Authors and filmmakers studied include Abla Farhoud, Wajdi Mouawad, Edouardo Manet, Michel Azama, Michele Cesaire, Anca Visdei, Pierre Gope et Nicolas Kurtovithc, and Moussa Toure.

Frequency: Occasionally.

FREN 330 - Towards a Postcolonial Pacific

This course is a comparative introduction to postcolonial literature (and some film) from the Pacific region, in particular from the so-called "Polynesian Triangle." The course examines recent works by major literary figures through a postcolonial prism, and focuses on literary representations of the political and social legacy of colonialism in these territories. For each country studied, we begin with a brief historical review of colonization in dialogue with a text written by a colonial visitor or settler. We then examine resistance to dominant colonialist discourse in the works of prominent contemporary "indigenous" authors, in dialogue with current political debates in each territory. Course themes include differing conceptions of race, ethnicity and indigeneity in each country, and their relation to the histories of British, French and U.S. imperialism in the Pacific; the rise of indigenous nationalist movements, and the question as to whether political independence defined in ethnic terms remains a feasible goal in an era of globalization; questions of language in a Pacific space still dominated by its colonial division into distinct "Anglonesian" and "Franconesian" spheres; and the island as a unit of political organization as opposed to alternative pan-Oceanic conceptions of inter-relation. Authors studied include Katherine Mansfield; Patricia Grace; Witi Ihimaera; Victor Segalen; Chantal Spitz; Célestine Vaite; Herman Melville; Mark Twain; Lee Cataluna; Lois-Ann Yamanaka.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

FREN 331 - Haiti: Culture, Human Rights and Humanitarianism

The January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, that killed more than 250,000 people, brought a lot of attention to the country traditionally described as "the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere." This course aims to provide students interested in humanitarianism, human rights, the Caribbean, cultural studies, and French and Francophone Studies an introduction to Haiti and Haitian culture throughout its history, including pre-and post-earthquake culture. It also aims at providing a thoughtful critical frame to the extraordinary humanitarian situation after the earthquake and the responses it generated at the Haitian and international levels. Throughout the course, students will become more familiar with Haitian history, its rich cultural production, and the relevance of culture to human rights representations, abuses, and responses to abuses as well as its relevance to various humanitarian crises in Haiti, especially the post-earthquake daily situation. Students will also gain knowledge about Haitian society, local organizations working in human rights and humanitarianism, the geography of Human Rights, local IDP environment, and humanitarian distribution of resources, and they will acquire the critical tools necessary to understand, assess, and participate in the current debates about human rights and humanitarianism practices in Haiti (including issues related to health, gender, economic rights, education, and access to resources of any kind). This course will be taught in English. Students taking it for credit counting toward the French major or Minor will be able to read some of the material and conduct their research in French. Students interested in doing an internship with one of the many organizations in the Twin Cities linked with Haiti should speak to the instructor.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

FREN 332 - Immigration in Europe

(yet to be determined)

Frequency: Occasionally.

FREN 333 - The Language of Diplomacy

This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and French and Francophone Studies, will introduce students to the broad range of international institutions where French is one of the primary working languages.   Students will also explore the connections between language, power, and human rights. To engage students from the outset with the lived and real experiences of those working in the larger diplomatic world, students will be assigned an individual whom they must interview to learn more about their career trajectory and the work that they do. We will also examine Europe's changing diplomatic policies over the past 150 years, and how those changes would culminate in the founding of the UN seventy years ago. To bring these real-life scenarios into the classroom, we will watch simulcast sessions in French from the ICC and UNHCR to get a feel for how things happen in practice and to analyze the ways in which French is used in these international diplomatic settings.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Cross-Listed as

ANTH 333 

FREN 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

FREN 409 - Cinema

This category introduces students to French or Francophone cinema, dealing with history, theory, and condition of production of this media. Prerequisite: a 300 level course or permission of instructor. Alternate years.   It includes such courses as: North Africa/France: Representations of Both Sides of the Mediterranean Through Cinema Survey of the historical and soci-economic contexts of North African Cinema (in Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia). The course examines representations of the colonial period (with texts, paintings, photographs, and critical material on orientalism and early cinema in the region), the French-Algerian war from various perspectives, and the national/post-colonial film production in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, all the way to the current cinema made after the January 2011 Revolution. The course also includes films by and about North Africans in France. Materials for the course include films as well as theoretical and critical materials about the regional cinema and film directors.

Frequency: Offered alternate years

Prerequisite(s)

One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 410 - Art/Ideas in French Culture

The course studies the arts of France (art, architecture, music and literature) in their historical and intellectual settings. Topics and historical periods studied vary by semester. Taught in French unless otherwise noted.   Arts and Ideas in Contemporary France This course will provide a chronological exposure to the prevailing trends and characteristics of the visual arts (paintings, sculptures, installations) in France with a special attention given to the highly politicized 60's and 70's. Through the use of films, slides, French web art sites and critical essays, these works will be studied and problematized from a sociological, political and cultural perspective.   Attention also will be given to the not-so-new notion of "francité" embedded in France's unique "politique nationale culturelle" as well as other contemporary visual art practices which strive to reflect an increasingly pluralistic French society.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 412 - Text and Identity

This category of courses introduces students to texts (including films) that engage students to focus on questions of identity(national, sexual, racial, and class identity) through the study of literature and film. ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. It includes such courses as: Parisiennes: Women of Paris In this course we examine the lives of "Parisiennes" - women who have lived in or come from the city of Paris from 1730 to the present. We begin with the powerful salonnières of the aristocratic 18th century, intersections of sexism, racism, and colonialism, and the peasant women's march on Versailles during the French Revolution of 1789. For the 19th century, we examine women's roles during the industrial revolution and the modernization of Paris, and the activists of the first wave of French feminism. In the first half of the 20th-century, we study women artists and writers in Paris, including some Americans who lived in Paris during that time. For the second half of the 20th century, we look at changing roles for Parisian women, including the second wave of French feminism, women in politics, and the changing attitudes toward women in French law and society during the 1970s and later. Readings include Claire de Duras' Ourika (1823), Colette's La Vagabonde (1910), excerpts of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex (1949), and Christiane Rochefort's Children of Heaven (1962). We also study recent works by francophone women writers living in Paris today, and view several recent films that focus on the lives of Parisian women.    

Frequency: Offered occasionally

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 or permission of instructor.

FREN 445 - How to Start a Revolution

Eighteenth-century France is a period characterized by vigorous literary and philosophical challenges to traditional authority and its institutions, although the events of 1789 were not anticipated by most of the leading thinkers of the period, and the notion that the Revolution was the necessary outcome of their challenges has often been viewed as a retrospective historical illusion. In this course we examine intellectual challenges to traditional authority during the final decades of the ancien regime in three primary areas: the domaine of politics and the state; the domain of religion and the church; and the domain of gender, sexuality and the family. The course culminates with a discussion of some key revolutionary ides and manifestos, and a review of th elegacy of French Enlightenment thought and its advances and limits, in dialogue with contemporary critical and theoretical perspectives. Themes to be discussed include despoism and democracy, freedom and equality, nature and culture, tolerance and fanaticism, deism and natural religion, atheism and materialism, education, sex and libertinage. Readings include selection from the Encyclopedie and from works by Rousseau, Montesquieu, Beaumarchais, De Gouges, Voltaire, Sade, Vivant Denon, Diderot, D'Holbach and La Mettrie.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

FREN 306 

FREN 488 - Senior Seminar

The course is intended primarily for advanced students who have studied in a French-speaking country, and is a requirement for all majors. The themes and theoretical approaches of the seminar will vary depending on the faculty teaching the course.   ALL COURSES ARE TAUGHT IN FRENCH UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Taught in French.  Recent offerings have included: Child Soldiers through Texts and Films, Quebec and Others, From the Far East to the Antipodes: Francophone Representations of Asia and the Pacific, and The Animal and the Human in the French Enlightenment.

Frequency: Offered occasionally

Prerequisite(s)

One 300 level course is required depending on content of French 494.

FREN 601 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 602 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 603 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 604 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 611 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 612 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 613 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 614 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 621 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 622 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 623 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 624 - Internship

Study abroad is strongly recommended. The internship does not count toward the major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Four courses in French among those designated for the completion of a major. Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

FREN 631 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 632 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 633 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 634 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

FREN 641 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 642 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 643 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

FREN 644 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.