Class Schedules

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Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated December 21, 2014 at 10:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
FREN 101-01  French I
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-02  French I
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L1  French I Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L2  French I Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 111 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L3  French I Lab
T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 227 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L4  French I Lab
R 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 216 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-01  French II
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 227 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L1  French II Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L2  French II Lab
R 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 100 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-01  Accelerated French I-II
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 404 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L1  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 228 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 194-01  Science Fiction and Technology in French Film and Literature
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 Andrew Billing
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* (Full title: Loving and Loathing our Posthuman Future: Science Fiction and Technology in French Film and Literature)

We live in a society obsessed with the promise and the perils of technology. We love our computers, tablets, smartphones and other electronic gadgets, our video games and our social media apps. Yet we also fear the zombification caused by technology addiction; electronic surveillance and its threat to privacy and freedom; and the possibility that in the near future robots might take our jobs. Moreover, some thinkers foresee that we will soon arrive at a moment of “singularity” in our relationship to technology with the creation of new forms of intelligence including superintelligent biologically-enhanced "posthumans," a possibility alternately exciting and frightening.

These fears and desires have been shaped by a long and often suspicious history of reflection on technology in western culture, including a particularly rich French literary and cinematic tradition. In this course, we will gain perspective on our contemporary situation and attitudes through the analysis of French fiction, film and graphic novels associated with the genre of science fiction. The works we will study are drawn from a wide range of contexts and historical periods, but all take as their principal themes speculation on technology and science; travel in time and space; human nature and its limits and our differences from other terrestrial and extra-terrestrial beings; and utopian or dystopian representations of the future.

Guiding our discussions will be the following questions: 1) what do these French science fiction works tell us about how we should understand technology as a distinct form of human endeavor? 2) and what do they also tell us about what it means to be human or even posthuman? 3) are French science fiction works a projection or "journey into fear" reflecting only the anxieties of the historical moments that produce them, or can they suggest real possibilities for radical social transformation? and 4) how have French science fiction works contributed to the development of the science fiction genre, and to what extent do they reflect a specifically French attitude to technology and science?

Texts and films studied will include some prophetic early literary works such as Cyrano de Bergerac's The Other World: The Societies and Government of the Moon (1657) and Louis-Sebastien Mercier's 1771 novel The Year 2440; Jules Verne's From the Earth to the Moon (1865); Pierre Boulle's seminal sci-fi classic Planet of the Apes (1963) and its cinematic adaptations; graphic novels including Jodorowsky and Moebius's The Incal (1982); and films including Marker's The Jetty (1962); Franju's classic take on plastic surgery Eyes Without a Face (1960); Godard's Alphaville (1965); Laloux's Fantastic Planet (1973); Jeunet and Caro's City of Lost Children (1995); Besson's Fifth Element (1997); and Happy End

FREN 203-01  French III
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 112 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-02  French III
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 213 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-03  French III
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 213 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L1  French III Lab
R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L2  French III Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 401 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L3  French III Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L4  French III Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L5  French III Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 227 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L6  French III Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-01  Text, Film and Media
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 212 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-02  Text, Film and Media
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 212 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L1  Text, Film and Media Lab
M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L2  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L3  Text, Film and Media Lab
W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L4  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-01  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 402 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L1  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L2  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 306-01  Intro to Literary Analysis: "The World Upside Down"
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required; taught in French* The theme for this semester’s course will focus on the notion of “the world upside down,” a term used to describe the novels of Renaissance author François Rabelais (Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World, 1965). When the world is in tumult, although it may seem upsetting or shocking, Rabelais, as well as other French and francophone authors, believed that it was a moment for innovation – changing identities, finding new perspectives, and contesting traditional ways. We will analyze a variety of texts, written from the 13th century to the 21st century, that look at the “world upside down.” We will analyze texts together in class and you will also analyze them on your own in a number of writing projects.

This course is a writing intensive course, and we will study different types of writing, including critical analysis and argumentative writing as well as some creative writing. We will also develop critical tools for textual interpretation and integrate cultural and historical contexts for the works we are studying. There will be guided library research, several short papers with rewrites, and a long final paper that incorporates a research component.

The course counts for the French major and minor and is taught entirely in French.



FREN 307-01  La France contemporaine: histoire, culture et actualite
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 404 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required; taught in French; for students who have already taken French 204 or French 305 (or who have the equivalent level). Not open to students who have already taken French 306 or higher* This course is designed for students who want to understand contemporary events and issues in France. The course includes a review of essential historical events that have shaped modern France, in particular the legacy of the French Revolution, the colonial empire, WWII and the French-Algerian War. These events have shaped all contemporary debates (i.e. the recent law regarding wearing religious symbols in schools, the October 2005 suburb riots, recent immigration laws, and many other topics). The course also studies the place of France in relationship with the United States and the European community. Some units focus on the production of French culture, French regions, and various intellectual/artistic movements through a variety of up-to-date authentic materials: newspaper articles, films, TV news, radio, and websites accessible through Moodle. This course is ideal for students planning to spend time in France, for students who want to include the study of France in various disciplines, from a cultural rather than literary angle, or who want to be able to understand what is going on in France today.

FREN 415-01  Environmentalism, Industrialization and Nature in 19th-century Literature and Art
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers
*Cross-listed with ENVI 494-01; first day attendance required; taught in French* Nature is a temple where living columns sometimes emit confused lyrics – Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal

To hell with civilization, long live nature and poetry ! – Théodore Rousseau, peintre

Ecolos avant l’heure? Environmentalism, Industrialization and Nature in 19th-century Literature and Art: The Industrial Revolution and the rise of Capitalism had a major impact on the environment in France during the nineteenth century, as it did in other European countries and the U.S. In what ways did the French respond to the environmental crisis in the nineteenth century and how did that set the stage for later developments? In 1854, the same year that Thoreau published Walden, the French created the Société Nationale de la Protection de la Nature. And in 1861 the first Réserve Naturelle was created by the French government to protect the forests of Fontainebleau from clear cutting, due in large part to the well-written petitions by writers and artists such as Victor Hugo, George Sand, and others.

In this course, we will look at a number of literary, cultural, and political texts written during the nineteenth century that focus on nature, the environment, and issues related to the rapid urbanization and industrialization of France. We will also study artworks by the Barbizon school, and by later artists including the impressionists of the later part of the nineteenth century. Texts will include works by well-known authors such as Honoré de Balzac, George Sand, and Emile Zola, but also less well-known writers Olympe Audouard and Marceline Desbordes-Valmore among others. We will also study a variety of contemporary critical theories on the subject, from Claude Brosseau’s Romans-Géographes and Bertrand Westphal’s La Géocritique to Blanc, Pughe et Chartier’s works on l’écopoétique.

In the end, we will try to answer the question of why and how the green movement developed in France and why it has been so different (some would say “behind”) the ecology movements of other western nations in Europe and in North America.

This course counts toward the French major or minor and will be taught entirely in French; prerequisite of one course at the 300-level in French.



FREN 416-01  Of a Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-01*

‘What is the beautiful?’ Plato, Hippias Major

‘To love beauty is to see light’ Victor Hugo

A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature is beautiful and philosophy is intelligent (smart); however, these distinctions about pleasure and rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature “makes you think” and how philosophy delves into the “pleasure of the text”. While distinct, the two disciplines are mutually dependent, to some extent.

This course scrutinizes the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choice, human freedom, commitment, gender issues). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Julia Kristeva, Simone de Beauvoir and Léopold Sédar Senghor. We will follow three axes:

1. The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas

2. A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view

3. A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction and Feminist theories.

This interdisciplinary course is taught in English. In order for it to count toward the French major or minor, students are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’.

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated December 21, 2014 at 10:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
FREN 102-01  French II
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 409 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-02  French II
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 409 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L1  French II Lab
T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L2  French II Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L3  French II Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L4  French II Lab
R 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-01  Accelerated French I-II
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L1  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L2  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-01  French III
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L1  French III Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L2  French III Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-01  Text, Film and Media
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-02  Text, Film and Media
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-03  Text, Film and Media
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 202 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L1  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L2  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L3  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L4  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L5  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 409 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L6  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-01  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L1  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
M 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L2  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon
*First day attendance required*

FREN 306-01  Introduction to Literary Analysis
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*

FREN 416-01  French Interdisciplinary Studies: Haiti: Culture, Human Rights and Humanitarianism
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 404 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required* The January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, that killed more than 250.000 people, brought a lot of attention to the country traditionally described as "the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere." In October 2014, the former dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier (Baby Doc 1971-1986) passed away before being brought to justice for his human rights crimes against the citizens of Haiti.

This course aims to provide students interested in humanitarianism, human rights, the Caribbean, cultural studies, and French and Francophone Studies an introduction to Haiti and Haitian culture throughout its history, including pre- and post-earthquake culture. It also aims at providing a thoughtful critical frame to the extraordinary humanitarian situation after the earthquake and the responses it generated at the Haitian and international levels.

Throughout the course, students will become more familiar with Haitian history, its rich cultural production, and the relevance of culture to human rights representations, abuses, and responses to abuses as well as its relevance to various humanitarian crises in Haiti, especially the post-earthquake daily situation. Students will also gain knowledge about Haitian society, local organizations working in human rights and humanitarianism, the geography of Human Rights, local IDP environment, and humanitarian distribution of resources, and they will acquire the critical tools necessary to understand, assess, and participate in the current debates about human rights and humanitarianism practices in Haiti (including issues related to health, gender, economic rights, education, and access to resources of any kind).

Materials for the course include interdisciplinary readings and reports (including various human rights reports, humanitarian assistance reports and updates, C.L.R. James, Paul Farmer, Michael Dash, Peter Hallward, Elizabeth McAlister, Edwidge Danticat, Myriam Chancy, Beverly Bell, Jacqueline Regis, and Anne-Christine d'Adesky among others) and films (by Raoul Peck, Anne Lescot and Laurence Magloire, Rachel Magloire, Jonathan Demme). Speakers will include human rights activists, writers, and humanitarian aid specialists about and from Haiti. Technology permitting, students will meet members of the Haitian community involved in relief work via Skype.

This course will be taught in English. Students taking it for credit counting toward the French major or Minor will be able to read some of the material and conduct their research in French. Students interested in doing an internship with one of the many organizations in the Twin Cities linked with Haiti should speak to the instructor.

FREN 494-01  L'image du monde: influences de la cartographie sur la littérature française
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 404 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required; taught in French* Maps tell us much more than merely how to get from here to there. One of the oldest forms of human communications, they ultimately express the many ways we attempt to understand the world and be part of it. The explorers, their itineraries, and their diaries offer a complex view of this world, too. This course will expose the different interactions between maps, explorers, and writers from Antiquity to present. During the Renaissance and later explorations, colonization also ushered a significant challenge to Christian and Muslim accounts of their travels. The indigenous peoples of Africa and the Americas offered ways for the explorers and cartographers to express their consternation or their enthusiasm and to subvert what was ordered by kings or queens.

Our class will explore the ways that Egyptians and Greeks (Aristotle, Plato, Ptolémée) influenced the thought of travelers of the Middle Ages (Marco Polo). We will discuss French Renaissance exploration and travel writing (Verrazano, Cartier, Thevet, Léry, Lescarbot, Christine de Pizan, Montaigne) and artists/cartographers (Leonard de Vinci, Michel Angelo Dürer, Alberti). We will read about the influences of 17th and 18th century mapmakers (Champlain, Finé, Roccoco and Baroque art/maps) through diaries of Hennepin, Nicollet, Champlain, la Carte du tendre.

The 19th century will bring many diaries and maps from utopian discourse (Villemart, Gustave Raulin, Charles-Albert Gauthier) to romantic travels (Victor Hugo, Jules Vernes). Contemporary diaries (Ruffin, Le Clezio, Amélie Nothomb and Sophie Calle) and their maps of the world will be studied through discussion and will show the changing dynamics of identity and the other in the Modern world.

These concepts and ideas will be debated through the study of journals, maps, and philosophical and literary texts of the time. Students will visit the Ford Library, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the Walker Art Center for studies of maps, their philosophical concepts (Aristotle, Plato, Erasmus, Machievelli, Descartes, Kant, Foucault, Didi-Huberman, Jean Luc Nancy, Greenblatt, Onfray) and their conceptualizations from late Sixteenth century to present. Prerequisite(s): FREN 306 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)

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