Class Schedules

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Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 6, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
FREN 101-01  French I
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 402 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-02  French I
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 111 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L1  French I Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L2  French I Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L3  French I Lab
T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 102 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 101-L4  French I Lab
R 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-01  French II
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 111 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L1  French II Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L2  French II Lab
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-01  Accelerated French I-II
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 401 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L1  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L2  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 194-01  La Belle Epoque? The Best and Worst of France, 1880-1914
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 402 Juliette Rogers
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* In this course, we will study the time period in France known as the “Belle Epoque” (1880-1914). This era was one of the richest in modern French cultural history, and we will examine the rise of the Impressionist and Cubist movements in art, the development of modern music by Debussy and Satie, and the expansion of French literature by authors Colette, Gide, and Proust. In popular culture, nightclubs such as the Moulin Rouge became major gathering places for artists, and the farce dominated popular theater. We will also briefly review the major technological and scientific advances of the time period, including the discoveries by Marie and Pierre Curie and the invention of cinema, the metro, and the automobile. However, we must also remember that this “beautiful” time included a darker side, and we will study several key causes that led to damaging or destructive events, such as the anti-semitism that spurred the Dreyfus Affair, the racist policies that promoted the continuing colonization of Africa during the period, and the political events leading up to World War I in 1914. At the end of the course, we will examine how developments during the Belle Epoque have affected contemporary French society a century later.

FREN 203-01  French III
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 401 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-02  French III
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 401 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-03  French III
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 112 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L1  French III Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L2  French III Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 226 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L3  French III Lab
T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L4  French III Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L5  French III Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 102 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L6  French III Lab
R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-01  Text, Film and Media
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 409 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-02  Text, Film and Media
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 409 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L1  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 227 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L2  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 170 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L3  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L4  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-01  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L1  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 306-01  Introduction to Literary Analysis
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 409 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*

FREN 412-01  Text and Identity: Parisiennes
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 216 Juliette Rogers
*Cross-listed with WGSS- 494-01; first day attendance required* In this course we will examine the lives of “Parisiennes” - women who have lived in or come from the city of Paris from 1730 to the present. We will begin with the powerful salonnières of the aristocratic 18th century, intersections of sexism, racism, and colonialism, and the peasant women’s march on Versailles during the French Revolution of 1789. For the 19th century, we will examine women’s roles during the industrial revolution and the modernization of Paris, and the activists of the first wave of French feminism. In the first half of the 20th-century, we will study women artists and writers in Paris, including some American women who lived in Paris during that time. For the second half of the 20th century, we will look at changing roles for Parisian women, including the second wave of French feminism, women in politics, and the changing attitudes toward women in French law and society. Readings will include Claire de Duras’ Ourika (1823), Colette’s La Vagabonde (1910), and excerpts of Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex (1949). We will also study recent works by francophone women writers living in Paris today, and will view several contemporary films that focus on the lives of Parisian women.

FREN 416-01  French Interdisciplinary Studies:French-German Dialogues in Philosophy and Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 401 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and POLI 394-03* This course focuses on the dialogue and mutual influence between the French-and German-speaking traditions of political economy and philosophical and theoretical thought, as it becomes evident in the relations among German Idealism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, structuralism, and twentieth-century Critical Theory. In reading the work of influential thinkers in the above fields we shall also examine the structural and conceptual homologies or differences among political economy, abstract thought, and human subjectivity. Beyond Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Jacques Lacan, our readings will include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean Laplanche and J. B. Pontalis, Gilles Deleuze, and Robert Pfaller. All readings and class taught in English.*Paper will be written in French for those wishing this course to count for a French major or minor.* If the course has reached its capacity of 20 by the time you register, please contact Prof. Kordela and you'll be allowed to register at the start of the semester.

FREN 494-01  Introduction to the French and Francophone World
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 402 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required* This course is a topics course designed to introduce students to the diversity of French and Francophone Cultures. Through the means of diverse medias: images, music, films, and texts, students will engage with different approaches to the cultural productions of several areas. The course includes aspects of French culture as well to cover how France and the Francophone World engage with each other.

Units will include: The transformations of Paris (May 1968, immigration, Paris and its periphery); The Tunisian Revolutions (from one Tunisia to the next); West Africa (modern cultures; emigration; riches); Central Africa (identity; languages; survival); Algeria (web documentaries on several generations, gender, rural/urban); Morocco (youth, tales of women, performances of human rights); Island multiculturalism (Mauritius cosmopolitanism, Caribbean diversity, Haitian riches, French Polynesian artists, Madagascar youth and history); Quebec (identity; language; diversity). The course will be conducted as a seminar. The goals of the course are to introduce students to a rich cultural transnational world in multiple relations with France, French language, changed by this relation and changing France and French as well, through various media. Films will be screened out of class. The course is taught in French. Prerequisites: 305 or the equivalent.

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 6, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
FREN 102-01  French II
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 402 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-02  French II
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 402 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L1  French II Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L2  French II Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L3  French II Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 102-L4  French II Lab
R 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 247 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-01  Accelerated French I-II
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 404 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L1  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 111-L2  Accelerated French I-II Lab
TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 226 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-01  French III
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 404 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-02  French III
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 409 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L1  French III Lab
T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L2  French III Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 401 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L3  French III Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 203-L4  French III Lab
R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 227 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-01  Text, Film and Media
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 402 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-02  Text, Film and Media
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-03  Text, Film and Media
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 402 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L1  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 227 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L2  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L3  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 401 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L4  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L5  Text, Film and Media Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 150 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 204-L6  Text, Film and Media Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Zoe Meyer
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-01  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L1  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 305-L2  Advanced Expression: Communication Tools
T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 227 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*

FREN 306-01  Introduction to Literary Analysis
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Cedric Briand
*First day attendance required*

FREN 408-01  French Cultural Studies: French Intellectuals
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 102 Cedric Briand
Full title: French Intellectuals in/and the World, Critical Tools for Critical Minds, Literature and Engagement. This seminar presents an overview of French culture, theory and philosophy from the Middle Ages to today. It focuses on how French intellectuals have engaged across time with issues such as gender, class, race, language, and the public and the private, among others. The course studies how French intellectuals use their critical thinking, and theoretical and creative writing to propose ideas, take ethical positions (or not), and through writing and acting, engage in solidarity work. Readings include Christine de Pizan on the role of intellectual women in the public sphere, Montaigne on colonialism, Pascal and Descartes on religion and science, Voltaire and Beccaria on torture and prisons, Michel Foucault on enlightenment, Victor Hugo on capital punishment, Pierre Bourdieu on "the organic intellectual" and more recent notions of commitment and civic engagement with war and peace, immigration, and postcolonial cultural history through the works of various contemporary artists, writers, and public intellectuals such as André Breton, Jean-Paul Sartre, Michel Foucault, Assia Djebar, Hélène Cixous and Boubacar Boris Diop. Taught in French. Prerequisite: One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 494-01  What happened in France from the Renaissance to the XVIIth century?
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 228 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required* What happened in France from the Renaissance to the XVIIth century? Did anybody read, write or live well? What were the important facts happening during this period in France? What are the movements in art, history, philosophy and literature that influenced the everyday life of women, children, and men during this time? What pleased the people, the court, the king?

More than understanding events as explanatory reports attached to an historical timeline, we will analyze supporting media that configure the events and view the formalized representations that they induced. The facts themselves sometimes are less important than the system of textual representation which recorded the phenomenon.

We will adopt complementary perspectives; taking into account the events and its media representation on one hand and review the forms of writing claiming historical testimony on the other hand. How can we deduce the evolution or non-evolution of the role of the women during these periods? What is the conception of raising kids, or a king? What are the different representations of the economy or the war during these periods? What is the concept of the “other’’ in those centuries? How do the explorations influence the court, the socio and economic system? How is the daily life conducted? How is the concept of ‘’human’’ taken into account? How will it affect the centuries after?

We will center our attention in questioning these facts relative to the affirmation of monarchical power (acts of wars, Newspapers, compte-rendus, philosophical treaties, diaries of kings or writers, maps, invasions, explorations, plays, diagrams, etc.) discuss their impact on the economic, sociological issues and intellectual trends of the period. We will also study the complex problem of the construction of the political, intellectual and sociological events and examine their interpretations through the study of texts, archives, films, chronicles, travel logs, exemplary stories, critics of the times, archived commentaries, debates, class discussions and 3 visits outside Macalester (visits to MIA and the James Ford Library Special Collections)

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