Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Fall 2017

COMP 123-01

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Lian Duan

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, robotics, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language. (4 credits)

COMP 123-02

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Lian Duan

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, robotics, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language. (4 credits)

COMP 123-03

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Elizabeth Ernst

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, robotics, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language. (4 credits)

COMP 123-04

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Elizabeth Ernst

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, robotics, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language. (4 credits)

COMP 123-05

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Getiria Onsongo

Notes: *First day attendance required; Students are required to have a laptop on which software may be installed and to bring it to class every day; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, robotics, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language. (4 credits)

COMP 261-01

Theory of Computation

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Susan Fox

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with MATH 361-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

A discussion of the basic theoretical foundations of computation as embodied in formal models and descriptions. The course will cover finite state automata, regular expressions, formal languages, Turing machines, computability and unsolvability, and the theory of computational complexity. Introduction to alternate models of computation and recursive function theory. (4 credits)


COMP 261-02

Theory of Computation

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Daniel Kluver

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with MATH 361-02; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

A discussion of the basic theoretical foundations of computation as embodied in formal models and descriptions. The course will cover finite state automata, regular expressions, formal languages, Turing machines, computability and unsolvability, and the theory of computational complexity. Introduction to alternate models of computation and recursive function theory. (4 credits)


COMP 484-01

Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Susan Fox

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the basic principles and techniques of artificial intelligence. Topics will include specific AI techniques, a range of application areas, and connections between AI and other areas of study (i.e., philosophy, psychology). Techniques may include heuristic search, automated reasoning, machine learning, deliberative planning and behavior-based agent control. Application areas include robotics, games, knowledge representation, logic, perception, and natural language processing. Offered even-numbered fall semesters. (4 credits)


ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-04

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-05

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First Year Course only* This course is an introduction to micro- and macroeconomics. It develops tools to analyze contemporary economic policy issues. Policy topics include globalization, the environment, poverty and inequality, and economic development. Students that take this course satisfy a prerequisite for higher-level economics courses, add a valuable component to interdisciplinary majors, and develop skills necessary to understand the fundamentals of economic policy. Final grades are based on three exams, homework assignments, and a project that involves a formal research proposal and an annotated bibliography. The course requires substantial amounts of mathematical problem solving, data analysis, and quantitative reasoning. It does not fulfill a writing requirement; students that take this course must register for another course in their first semester that fulfills the college’s writing requirement.

Class meets TR, 9:40 am - 11:10 am in Carnegie 305

Writing designation: None

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


ECON 119-06

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: *First Year Course only* This course provides an introduction to micro- and macroeconomics. Students will be introduced to the fundamental models used in economic analysis and discuss applications to real-world economic issues. This course is a prerequisite for higher-level economics courses but also serves as a comprehensive treatment of economics for non-majors. Final grades are based on three exams, several homework assignments and a handful of small writing assignments requiring students to synthesize and critique arguments in popular media using the themes discussed in class. The course completely satisfies the quantitative thinking requirement, with a Q3 designation. It does not fulfill a writing requirement; students that take this course must register for another course in their first semester that fulfills the college's writing requirement.

Class meets TR, 1:20 pm - 2:50 pm in Neill Hall 401

Writing designation: None

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 490-01; Capstone course*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as a Group E elective for the major. Cross-listed with Psychology 490. (4 credit)

EDUC 220-01

Educational Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Tina Kruse

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*

An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings. (4 credits)

LING 100-01

Introduction to Linguistics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Christina Esposito

Notes: The aim of this course is to make you aware of the complex organization and systematic nature of language, the primary means of human communication. In a sense, you will be studying yourself, since you are a prime example of a language user. Most of your knowledge of language, however, is unconscious, and the part of language that you can describe is largely the result of your earlier education, which may have given you confused, confusing, or misleading notions about language. This course is intended to clarify your ideas about language and bring you to a better understanding of its nature. By the end of the course you should be familiar with some of the terminology and techniques of linguistic analysis and be able to apply this knowledge to the description of different languages. (4 credits)

LING 294-01

Time and Space

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Stephanie Farmer

Notes: Imagine making plans for the future without using the future tense, or giving your friend directions to your house without using the words "left" and "right." Imagine using a river as a compass, or mapping the human body onto objects to describe how they are oriented. Talking about time and space is central to the human experience, yet the languages of the world encode these concepts in vastly different ways. This course is an introduction to linguistic diversity through the lens of time and space. We will survey all corners of the world, looking at the fascinating ways human languages diverge from one another and pinpointing what is common between them.

LING 311-01

Philosophy of Language

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Joy Laine

Notes: *Cross-listed with PHIL 311-01*

What is language and what is it for? What makes a series of sounds into a meaningful sentence? What makes a sentence true? Why is language always changing? This course will introduce students to ways in which twentieth century philosophers have attempted to provide answers to such questions. Since the philosophy of language has been so crucial to contemporary philosophy, this course also serves as an introduction to philosophical thought from the beginning of twentieth century to the present. Topics will range from more technical problems (theories of meaning, reference and truth; synonymy and analyticity; universals and natural kinds; private languages) to broader issues examining the relationship between language and culture (language games; radical interpretation; social change). Readings typically include writings by Ludwig Wittgenstein, W.V. Quine, John Searle, Donald Davidson, Richard Rorty, Michel Foucault, and bell hooks. Cross-listed with Philosophy 311. (4 credits)

MATH 155-01

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-02

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-03

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-04

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


PHIL 111-01

Introduction to Symbolic Logic

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Janet Folina

Notes: *First Year Course only* Every day we hear, read, make and assess arguments. These occur in political rhetoric, advertising campaigns, and among friends and family. Many arguments are persuasive. But some persuasive arguments are incorrect (some of these abuse statistics, some are actually fallacies); and some correct arguments are not very persuasive (at least not immediately). Logic is the science of correct reasoning and argumentation, and symbolic logic is the use of symbols and formal rules to codify this correctness. Our approach is formal – symbolic logic depends only on the form of arguments rather than their content. (This course is thus somewhat abstract and theoretical; it is not a course on applied critical thinking.) We will focus on formal properties of deductive arguments; our tools and methods constitute the fundamental methods of contemporary symbolic logic. In symbolic logic symbols represent types of sentences, and rules are cited for each inference. Thus, proofs in this course are somewhat like proofs in geometry: they both depend on clear criteria for correctness and incorrectness.

The course divides into the following standard topics:

1. Formalization of arguments in propositional logic.

2. Natural Deduction: learning and applying formal rules of proof.

3. Truth tables and semantic trees.

4. Formalization of arguments in predicate logic.

5. Natural Deduction: proofs in Predicate Logic.

The immediate aim of this course is to provide you with some formal methods for (i) determining whether or not an argument has a correct form, and (ii) proving a conclusion from a given set of premises. In addition to learning a formal system, the tools acquired in this course can be applied to real arguments, and logic helps students distinguish good arguments from bad ones, and to justify such distinctions. Logic also helps students improve their writing, as it assists in articulating the logical structure of an argument. Finally, logic is central to mathematics as well as philosophy. This course provides a good foundation for both majors, and indeed any discipline that emphasizes correct, clear thinking, reading and writing.

Class meets MWF 9:40 am - 10:40 am in Carnegie 206

Writing designation: None


PHIL 111-02

Introduction to Symbolic Logic

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Janet Folina

Notes:

PHIL 310-01

Philosophy of Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Janet Folina

Notes: Are quarks “real”? Does science lead to objective knowledge? Is there really a scientific method? How do we distinguish between creation “science” and evolution; or astrology and astronomy? These questions are asked in philosophy of science, which studies the fundamental processes, principles, and presuppositions of the natural sciences. The social and historical contexts of the sciences are also considered. Topics include: science vs. pseudoscience, scientific explanation, scientific revolutions, the philosophy of space and time, the theory of evolution, theories of confirmation, objectivity in science, and realism vs. relativism. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

PHIL 311-01

Philosophy of Language

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Joy Laine

Notes: *Cross-listed with LING 311-01*

What is language and what is it for? What makes a series of sounds into a meaningful sentence? What makes a sentence true? Why is language always changing? This course will introduce students to ways in which twentieth century philosophers have attempted to provide answers to such questions. Since the philosophy of language has been so crucial to contemporary philosophy, this course also serves as an introduction to philosophical thought from the beginning of twentieth century to the present. Topics will range from more technical problems (theories of meaning, reference and truth; synonymy and analyticity; universals and natural kinds; private languages) to broader issues examining the relationship between language and culture (language games; radical interpretation; social change). Readings typically include writings by Ludwig Wittgenstein, W.V. Quine, John Searle, Donald Davidson, Richard Rorty, Michel Foucault, and bell hooks. Cross-listed with Linguistics 311. (4 credits)

POLI 269-01

Empirical Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: Strategies and tactics of design, observation, description, and measurement in contemporary political research. (4 credits) Empirical Methods: The department requires its majors to take one course in empirical research methodology, preferably before their junior year. There are a number of courses that fulfill this requirement, including: Political Science 269 (Empirical Research Methods), Political Science 272 (Researching Political Communication), Sociology 269 (Science and Social Inquiry), Sociology 270 (Interpretive Social Research), Sociology 275 (Comparative-Historical Sociology). In some cases, research methods courses taken in other social science disciplines may be used to fulfill this requirement following approval by the political science department chair.

PSYC 100-01

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Joan Ostrove

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 100-02

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Jhon Wlaschin

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. (4 Credits)


PSYC 180-01

Brain, Mind, and Behavior

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Deborah Kreiss

Notes: A multidisciplinary investigation of behavior and the nervous system. Particular emphasis is placed on human processes of perception, cognition, learning, memory, and language. This course also serves as the introductory course for the neuroscience studies major. (4 credits)

PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 220-01

Educational Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Tina Kruse

Notes: *Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*

An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings. (4 credits)

PSYC 242-01

Cognitive Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Ariel James

Notes: A survey of the experimental analysis of the mind. Topics include attention, memory and forgetting, problem solving, reasoning, and language. Special emphasis is given to the study of discourse comprehension and reading. The weekly laboratory sessions afford students an opportunity to interact directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods. Group A course. (4 credits)


PSYC 244-01

Cognitive Neuroscience

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: *Permission of the instructor is required for ACTC students*

Cognitive neuroscience is a relatively recent discipline that combines cognitive science and cognitive psychology with biology and neuroscience to investigate how the brain enables the myriad of complex functions we know as the mind. This course will explore basic concepts and contemporary topics in the field, focusing in particular on the methods used in cognitive neuroscience research. Through lecture and lab sessions, students will learn to read and interpret primary source material, design and implement cognitive neuroscience studies, and present research in verbal and written forms. Overall, students will gain an appreciation for the amazing intricacy of the brain-mind relationship, as well as a sense of how this relationship may be understood eventually using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Group A course. (4 credits)

PSYC 254-01

Social Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: William Johnson

Notes: This course will survey the ways in which social phenomena influence the thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals. The major theories, experiments, and issues associated with social psychology will be examined. Sample topics include love, aggression, conformity, attitudes, prejudice, persuasion, obedience, and attribution. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 490-01; Capstone course*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as Group E elective for the Economics major. Cross-listed with Economics 490. 4 credits

Spring 2018

COMP 123-01

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Lian Duan

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving five seats for first years students*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language.

COMP 123-02

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Lian Duan

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving five seats for first year students*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language.

COMP 123-03

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Getiria Onsongo

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving five seats for first year students*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language.

COMP 123-04

Core Concepts in Computer Science

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Susan Fox

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving five seats for first year students.*

This course introduces the field of computer science, including central concepts such as the design and implementation of algorithms and programs, testing and analyzing programs, the representation of information within the computer, and the role of abstraction and metaphor in computer science. The exploration of these central ideas will draw examples from a range of application areas including multimedia processing, turtle graphics, and text processing. Course work will use the Python programming language.

COMP 261-01

Theory of Computation

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Daniel Kluver

Notes: *Cross-listed with MATH 361-01; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor*

This course examines the theoretical foundations of computation. It explores different mathematical models that try to formalize our informal notion of an algorithm. Models include finite automata, regular expressions, grammars, and Turing machines. The course also discusses ideas about what can and cannot be computed. In addition, the course explores the basics of complexity theory, examining broad categories of problems and their algorithms, and their efficiency. The focus is on the question of P versus NP, and the NP-complete set. Prerequisite(s): COMP 124 and MATH 279, or permission of instructor.

COMP 380-01

Bodies/Minds: AI Robotics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Susan Fox

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

This course examines two distinct aspects of work in robotics: the physical construction of the robot's "body" and the creation of robot control programs that form the robot's "mind." It will study the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of robot sensors, including sonar, infrared, touch, GPS, and computer vision. It will also examine both reactive and deliberative approaches to robot control programs. The course will include hands-on work with multiple robots, and a semester-long course project in robotics. Prerequisite(s): COMP 221 or permission of instructor.

COMP 440-01

Collective Intelligence

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 101
  • Instructor: Shilad Sen

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor*

This course introduces the theory and practice of data science applied to online communities such as Wikipedia, Facebook, and Twitter. Students will read and discuss recent academic research papers that analyze behavior on these websites and use computational simulation, machine learning, and data-mining techniques to analyze massive behavioral datasets in areas such as recommender systems, natural language processing, and tagging systems. Prerequisite(s): COMP 124 and COMP 221, or permission of instructor.

ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money.

ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money.

ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money.

ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. This course counts as a Group E elective. Prerequisite(s): MATH 135 or MATH 137, and one 200-level Economics course from Group E electives. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. C- or higher required for all prerequisites.

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. This course counts as a Group E elective. Prerequisite(s): MATH 135 or MATH 137, and one 200-level Economics course from Group E electives. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. C- or higher required for all prerequisites.

ECON 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. This course counts towards the capstone.  This course counts as a Group E elective. Prerequisite(s): ECON 361 and ECON 371. C- or higher required for all prerequisites.

EDUC 220-01

Educational Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Tina Kruse

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*

An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings.

ENGL 260-01

Science Fiction: From Matrix Baby Cannibals to Brave New Worlds

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: James Dawes

Notes: In the past fifty years, science fiction has emerged as the primary cultural form for thinking about human extinction: climate catastrophe and natural disasters, plagues that empty continents, and species suicide through war. But science fiction has also emerged as the primary cultural form for imagining a near boundless future through technological progress: artificial superintelligence, cybernetic enhancement of the human, and the possibility of utopian political order. Facing such disorienting and unfathomable changes, science fiction seeks with frantic energy to understand what it means to be a human and to live a meaningful life. Why are we here? What are we to become? How will the promises of technology, or the lethal threats of scarcity, change what it means to be a thinking, feeling human? In this course we will examine works of science fiction as complex aesthetic achievements, as philosophical inquiries into the nature of being and time, and as theoretical examinations of the nature of human cognition. We will engage in intensive readings of contemporary texts, including works by Ted Chiang, Lidia Yuknavitch, Philip K. Dick, Margaret Atwood, Octavia Bulter, Stanislaw Lem, Kazuo Ishiguro, and others. A companion film series will include the Matrix and other films in the genre

GEOG 378-01

Statistical Research Methods in Geography

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *First day attendance required; Geography majors only*

This course focuses on the statistical methods that geographers use to describe and analyze places and themes. Students will learn both descriptive and inferential statistical methods for use in geographical research, including exploratory data analysis techniques, spatial statistics, geographic sampling, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. The course provides students with experience in the application of statistical methods to spatial problems through the use of statistical software. Students will also learn to evaluate and develop statistical research designs, including preparation and presentation of an original research project. Prerequisite(s): Geography major or permission of instructor.

LING 100-01

Introduction to Linguistics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Stephanie Farmer

Notes: The aim of this course is to make you aware of the complex organization and systematic nature of language, the primary means of human communication. In a sense, you will be studying yourself, since you are a prime example of a language user. Most of your knowledge of language, however, is unconscious, and the part of language that you can describe is largely the result of your earlier education, which may have given you confused, confusing, or misleading notions about language. This course is intended to clarify your ideas about language and bring you to a better understanding of its nature. By the end of the course you should be familiar with some of the terminology and techniques of linguistic analysis and be able to apply this knowledge to the description of different languages. There are no prerequisites, but this course is the prerequisite for almost every higher level course within the linguistics major.

MATH 155-01

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 155-02

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 155-03

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 155-04

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 313-01

Advanced Symbolic Logic

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Janet Folina

Notes: *Cross-listed with PHIL 313-01*

A second course in symbolic logic which extends the methods of logic. A main purpose of this course is to study logic itself-to prove things about the system of logic learned in the introductory course. This course is thus largely logic about logic. Topics include second order logic and basic set theory; soundness, consistency and completeness of first order logic; incompleteness of arithmetic; Turing computability; modal logic; and intuitionistic logic. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 111 or MATH 279 or permission of instructor.

PHIL 110-01

Critical Thinking

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Diane Michelfelder

Notes: This course introduces and explores the main principles and methods of Critical Thinking: distinguishing between good and bad arguments; identifying common fallacies; developing strong and persuasive arguments; the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning; constructing logical proofs; the nature of scientific, moral, and legal reasoning; evaluating polls and statistical hypotheses; understanding probability; deciding how to act under uncertainty. Students will apply these principles and methods to numerous academic and 'everyday' contexts, including journals, the print press, blogs, political rhetoric, advertising and documentaries. We will regularly reflect upon more broadly philosophical matters related to Critical Thinking - such as the nature of truth and objectivity and the distinction between science and pseudo-science - and examine a number of intriguing philosophical paradoxes. Students will improve their skills in writing clear and compelling argumentative papers and critically analyzing the writings of others. Course work includes reading, class discussion, regular homework assignments, quizzes, and short argumentative essays.

PHIL 201-01

Modern Philosophy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Geoffrey Gorham

Notes: A study of the 17th and 18th century philosophers, including the Empiricists, Rationalists, and Kant. The course considers issues regarding skepticism, justification, freedom of the will, personal identity, perception and the existence of God.

PHIL 213-01

Philosophy of Mind

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Joy Laine

Notes: Materialism, rather than solving the problem of mind, consciousness and intentionality, has spawned numerous philosophical perplexities. This course will examine a variety of philosophical problems associated with contemporary models of the mind (mind/body dualism; mind/brain identity theories; behaviorism; functionalism and artificial intelligence; eliminative naturalism and folk psychology; biological naturalism). The course will also look at contemporary philosophical accounts of personhood and personal identity, particularly narrative accounts of the self. Readings will typically include David Chalmers, Daniel Dennett, Owen Flanagan, Derek Parfit, Marya Schechtman, John Searle, Galen Strawson, and Kathleen Wilkes.

PHIL 313-01

Advanced Symbolic Logic

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Janet Folina

Notes: *Cross-listed with MATH 313-01*

A second course in symbolic logic which extends the methods of logic. A main purpose of this course is to study logic itself-to prove things about the system of logic learned in the introductory course. This course is thus largely logic about logic. Topics include second order logic and basic set theory; soundness, consistency and completeness of first order logic; incompleteness of arithmetic; Turing computability; modal logic; and intuitionistic logic. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 111 or MATH 279 or permission of instructor.

POLI 269-01

Empirical Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: Strategies and tactics of design, observation, description, and measurement in contemporary political research. Prerequisite: at least one political science foundations course. Every year. (4 credits) Empirical Methods: The department requires its majors to take one course in empirical research methodology, preferably before their junior year. There are a number of courses that fulfill this requirement, including:  POLI 269 (Empirical Research Methods), POLI 272, SOCI 269, SOCI 270, SOCI 275. In some cases, research methods courses taken in other social science disciplines may be used to fulfill this requirement following approval by the political science department chair. Prerequisite(s): at least one political science foundations course

PSYC 100-01

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Jhon Wlaschin

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and group and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components.

PSYC 100-02

Introduction to Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Ariel James

Notes: An introduction to psychological science -- the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and group and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components.

PSYC 180-01

Brain, Mind, and Behavior

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Deborah Kreiss

Notes: A multidisciplinary investigation of behavior and the nervous system. Particular emphasis is placed on human processes of perception, cognition, learning, memory, and language. This course also serves as the introductory course for the neuroscience major.

PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We examine how to test psychological hypotheses using various statistical analyses, and we consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational research designs. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 Permission of instructor is required for first year students

PSYC 242-01

Cognitive Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: How do people learn, remember, and think?  How much of our cognitive life are we even consciously aware of?  This course addresses these questions and others from the perspective of experimental cognitive psychology.  Topics include perception, attention, memory, the organization of knowledge, language comprehension, and decision making. Special attention will be paid to the role that cognition plays in applied setting such as the courtroom and classroom.  Weekly laboratory sessions afford students the opportunity to interact more directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods.  Readings are mainly from primary sources.  Group A course. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100

PSYC 377-01

Moral Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course explores how and why we make moral judgments about people and their behavior. How are our moral judgments shaped by intuition, emotion, and reasoning? What are the moral implications of climate change? Do we ever put the interests of our broader group or community above our own self-interest? How do we balance punishment motives of retribution and deterrence, and how do these relate to policy decisions about capital punishment? Could a robot have moral rights and responsibilities? We will examine these questions by considering theories and findings from social, developmental, evolutionary, and political psychology, as well as from related fields like philosophy and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 385-01

Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Darcy Burgund

Notes: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique used to provide indirect measures of neural activity in healthy (and unhealthy) humans. Although the technique has been readily available to researchers for only about 20 years, its popularity and use has grown tremendously in the last 10, and we now see it influencing aspects of culture and society not traditionally based in biomedical research (i.e., law, politics, economics). This course will cover the mechanics of fMRI, evaluate its strengths and weaknesses, and explore recent applications that have received wide and sometimes controversial media coverage. By the end of the course, students will understand essential components of the fMRI technique and be informed consumers of primary and secondary source reports involving brain imaging. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or MATH 155  and PSYC 244 or PSYC 248.

PSYC 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas.  Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as a Group E elective for the Economics major. Prerequisite(s): ECON 361 and ECON 371. C- or higher required for all prerequisites.

SOCI 269-01

Social Science Inquiry

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Terry Boychuk

Notes: Social science presents claims about the social world in a particular manner that is centered on theoretical claims (explanations) supported by evidence. This course covers the methods through which social scientists develop emprically-supported explanations. The course covers three main sets of topics: the broad methodological questions posed by philosophy of social science, how social scientists develop research design to generate relevant evidence, and methods with which social scientists analyze data. For both the research design and analysis sections, we will concentrate on quantitative research, learning how to use statistical software.