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Spring 2017

INTL 114-01

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-02

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 194-01

Introduction to International Studies: Pandemics and the World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore only, or by permission of instructor* Historically, infectious diseases have been among the great equalizers of nations. Infectious diseases cross borders with little respect for societal hierarchy or political position in the world order. Pandemics have repeatedly challenged the notion of the nation state, religious and political ideology and social structures. Modern day pandemics have the ability to spread further geographically, reflecting our ever more globalized world. Pandemics can concurrently reflect strong nationalist (almost isolationist) tendencies, alongside growing reliance on a global governance structure. However, they also increasingly reveal society’s marginalized peoples and their limited participation in and attention from government. Through the stories of historical and modern day pandemics, students will explore notions of the state, definitions of society, political and governance structures, and the interactions between people and their self-defined world.

INTL 194-02

Going Global: The Experiment of World History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 180-01*


INTL 225-01

Comparative Economic Systems

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*

Intermediate Courses. This course examines the workings of economic systems from the perspective of the incentives facing the firm and consumer. The course provides an introduction to the economics of information and organization which is used to evaluate resource allocation under the specific institutional environment of different economic systems. Our understanding of the incentive system is then used to evaluate the overall economic system. The focus of the course is primarily on the U.S., Japan and the former Soviet Union/Russia. As time permits the course may examine China, Germany and Central Europe. This course counts as a Group A elective for Economics major and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. Cross-listed with Economics 225. (4 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 252-01

Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with ANTH 252-01 and MCST 252-01*

This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century. In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.” This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations. One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally. (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 credits)

INTL 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field. Cross-listed with Anthropology 253. (4 credits)

INTL 265-01

Translation as Cross-Cultural Communication

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Julia Chadaga

Notes: *Advanced proficiency in a second language required; cross-listed with LING 294-02 and RUSS 265-01*

When communication takes place across language barriers, it raises fundamental questions about meaning, style, power relationships, and traditions. This course treats literary translation as a particularly complex form of cross-cultural interaction. Students will work on their own translations of prose or poetry while considering broader questions of translation, through critiques of existing translations, close comparisons of variant translations, and readings on cultural and theoretical aspects of literary translation. Advanced proficiency in a second language required. (4 credits)

INTL 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

INTL 294-01

Muslim Women Writers

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 294-09 and WGSS 294-02* Against the swirling backdrop of political discourses about women in the Islamic world, this course will engage with feminist and postcolonial debates through literary works by Muslim women writers. The course will begin with an exploration of key debates about women’s agency and freedom, the Islamic headscarf, and Qur’anic hermeneutics. With this in mind, we will turn to the fine details of literature and poetry by Muslim women. How do these authors constitute their worlds? How are gendered subjectivities constructed? And how do the gender politics of literary texts relate to the broader political and historical contexts from which they emerge? Themes will include an introduction to Muslim poetesses and Arabic poetic genres, the rise of the novel in the Arabic speaking world, and Muslim women’s literary production outside of the Middle East: from Senegal to South Asia, and beyond.

INTL 300-01

Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*

This course is an in-depth study of some specific theories and methodologies on which contemporary feminist and queer thinkers have based their analysis, critique, and reconstruction of men's and women's roles. Some guiding questions are: What is a nation? Who are its citizens? How do language and gender roles shape the ways we imagine our roles as men and women? Do sexuality or economy affect how we subscribe to or resist political ideologies? In previous offerings, the course has explored the intersection of Postcolonialism (specifically gendered critiques of colonizing sociopolitical structures) with Postmodernism (specifically gendered critiques of language and sexuality). The course will include film, photography, music, and the writings of Butler, Foucault, Chodorow, Kristeva, hooks, Spivak, and Trinh, among others. It offers ways to create links with local community and social-work organizations. (4 credits)

INTL 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Charmaine Chua

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required; cross-listed with POLI 320*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with Political Science 320. (4 credits)

INTL 321-01

Cultures of Neoliberalism

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Bradley Stiffler

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 321*


INTL 342-01

Representing the World As It Is: Histories/Theories of Ethnographic Film

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with ANTH 342-01 and MCST 342-01*

How can an experience of the world as it is be represented? What are the promises and challenges of transcultural filmmaking? This course will explore what has been called ethnographic, cross-cultural and transcultural cinema from several points of view. We will look at ethnographic film in terms of its geo-political, anthropological and cinematic origins, and then delve into its various forms and contemporary manifestations. We will examine some of the major films of the canon of ethnographic cinema, and look at the developments of several it its most renowned practitioners (Flaherty, Mead, Rouch, Marshall, Gardner, Asch, MacDougall). We will explore the shifting forms and representational strategies of ethnographic film and how these are linked to technological and ideological transformations. We will see how scholars inside and outside of anthropology have defined, criticized or challenged the project of ethnographic film, and how recent film and video makers, including those who traditionally have been the subject of the ethnographic gaze, have created new ways of visualizing experience for themselves and for others. (4 credits)

INTL 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with Political Science 352. (4 credits)

INTL 380-01

Global Leadership

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: ZLeadership is among the deepest features of associational life, pervading every profession and institution, especially in the age of complex global change. Thus this seminar explores leadership. We begin with the relationship between structure and agency, and then focus on vision and invention, integrity and legitimacy, flexibility and decisiveness. Readings draw from Western, Islamic, and Indian sources. The main paper will focus on a major individual from any century or locale, chosen by the student. Open to all but first years. Every fall. (4 credits)

INTL 382-01

Poverty, Health, and Development

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course explores the links among poverty, health and socio-economic development in low-income countries. Key principles, methodologies and approaches to designing and evaluating programs to improve the health of poor populations will be discussed. We will explore several contemporary approaches to linked poverty reduction, public health improvement, and development. Enrollment limited to International Studies majors, Community and Global Health Concentrators, or International Development concentrators, or by permission of the instructor. 4 credits.

INTL 394-01

Colonial Rites: Anguish, Otherness, and the Study of Religion

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: William Hart

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 394-01* This course explores colonialism as an ensemble of ritual performances. To what extent, we ask, is colonialism the interpretive context for the study of religion? And how is this context related to historical and contemporary questions of anguish and otherness? Drawing on developments in theater, ritual, and performance studies, we explore five modalities of colonialism: colonialism as charisma, violence, gender, race, and writing. After explicating these colonial modalities, we turn our attention to specific cases, which are drawn from the triangulation of India, Africa, and America in the modern, European imperial/colonial imagination.

INTL 394-02

Global Generosity

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 394-03* From Italian Mafia dons to famous American philanthropists; from the knitting of “trauma teddies” in Helsinki to gift shopping in London; and from ceremonial exchange rings in Melanesia to the present day global refugee crisis: this course will investigate how generosity is understood and practiced in global perspective. We’ll begin the semester by examining key debates surrounding reciprocity, gifts, and exchange, theories of altruism and generosity, and patron-client relations. We’ll then explore the birth of the “humanitarian spirit,” and the complicated ethics and politics of humanitarian intervention. We will compare diverse religious traditions’ approaches to giving, including Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Jainism. And we’ll explore contemporary debates surrounding volunteerism within sectarian and neoliberal political regimes.

INTL 489-01

Senior Seminar: Capitalism and World (Dis)Order

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: Capitalism, for many, is synonymous with the "natural" exchange of goods and services through "the free market." But fuller examination shows capitalism to be neither natural, free, nor limited to economic transactions. Capitalism more precisely is a historical social system and a way of being which now penetrates all forms of life: cultural, ecological, civic and more. This senior seminar aims to identify capitalism's origins and development, and interrogate its contemporary status. Thinkers such as Smith, Marx, and Braudel will loom, but readings will focus on works by Beaud, Weber, Tawney, Kotz, Wallerstein, and others. The course concludes with a significant research paper on a topic, relevant to the theme, of a student's choice. Senior standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits)

Fall 2017

INTL 110-01

Introduction to Intl Studies: Globalization - Homogeneity and Heterogeneity

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

Globalization is upon us, resulting in unprecedented cultural interpenetration and civilizational encounter. Most of what animates this condition is old. However, the contemporary velocity, reach, and mutations of these forces suggest a new "world time," full of contradictions, perils, and promises. This course introduces students to globalization by asking What is globalization, and how does one study it? What are the principal forces (social groups, ideas, institutions, and ecological circumstances) that shaped and now propel it? What are its concrete consequences, and how are we to respond? Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 112-01

Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

What roles do media play in constituting identities for people and places both near and far? How do various media facilitate or hinder globalization? How are cultures and cultural identities shaped by contemporary media practices and globalization? The course introduces some key concepts in social theory that have been central to how media is researched (i.e.: public sphere, nation, media, identity, diaspora, multiculturalism and so on). We will investigate the role of media in constituting national identities, contesting and proposing political visions, creating subcultures, and representing and shaping social categories such as race, gender and class. How do media create categories of people? How do people inhabit, resist, subvert, reproduce those categories in and through media? This course focuses on thinking through, about and with media. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 112-02

Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

What roles do media play in constituting identities for people and places both near and far? How do various media facilitate or hinder globalization? How are cultures and cultural identities shaped by contemporary media practices and globalization? The course introduces some key concepts in social theory that have been central to how media is researched (i.e.: public sphere, nation, media, identity, diaspora, multiculturalism and so on). We will investigate the role of media in constituting national identities, contesting and proposing political visions, creating subcultures, and representing and shaping social categories such as race, gender and class. How do media create categories of people? How do people inhabit, resist, subvert, reproduce those categories in and through media? This course focuses on thinking through, about and with media. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 194-01

Introduction to Islam

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Gregory Lipton

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with RELI 100-01* This course charts the formation of Islam and the expansion of Muslim peoples, from the life of the Prophet Muhammad to the Mongol conquest of Baghdad. It will examine Muslim institutions, beliefs, and ritual practices in their historical contexts. In addition to the basics of Muslim practice and belief, the class will introduce students to mystic traditions (Sufism), Islamicate statecraft, and intellectual/legal traditions as well as cultural trends including art, architecture, and literature.

INTL 202-01

Global Media Industries

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Michael Griffin

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 202-01*

Global media collectively have tremendous influence in how many see and comprehend the world and therefore on the information and beliefs upon which they feel or act. While media are central to the continued production of a sense of "the world" at large or the "global" scale, media industries are situated geographically, culturally and institutionally. Even if they promise worldwide coverage or are multinational companies, there is much to be gained from studying how media are produced and distributed differently according to specific social, political, economic and historical conditions. This course considers media industries around the world with a focus on the relationships between the labor and infrastructures behind representations in a broad range of media (television, radio, cinema, news, telecommunications, internet). (4 credits) Cross-listed with Media and Cultural Studies 202.

INTL 232-01

Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MARKIM LOWER
  • Instructor: Kate Reiling

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 232-01; first day attendance required; students that have completed the Economics Department Entrepreneurship course cannot enroll in this course*

This course is focused and driven by student team project work. Students will prioritize social problems / issues for which they would like to engage in the creation / implementation of a solution. They will spend the semester working to more deeply understand the problems, research successful and failed attempts to resolve the problem in other contexts, and to generate a solution that includes a well researched model for introducing sustainable social change. It is through this engagement that students will grapple with the challenging realities of practice and implementation. Students will study several methodologies including Lean Startup, Human Centered Design, Participatory Poverty Assessment and Impact Gap Analysis. Students will learn through their own experiences and utilize case studies comparing problems, their root causes and the entrepreneurial approaches deployed to address them from various countries and cultural contexts. (4 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01 and RELI 294-02*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field. Cross-listed with Anthropology 253. (4 credits)

INTL 282-01

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Kata Chillag

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course will place emphasis on the social, ethical, and political dimensions of international public health policies, programs, and research. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Different perspectives and approaches to health problems will be considered and debated, including occasional guest presentations and discussions with international public health professionals.

INTL 285-01

Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 285-01*

This course explores ethnic nationalism's causes and consequences in Eastern Europe. Drawing on several disciplines, we begin by examining the core concepts and theories in the contemporary study of nationalism. We then explore both the historical roots of Eastern European nationalisms, and their implications for democracy, minority inclusion, regional stability, and European integration. Cross-listed with Political Science 285. (4 credits)

INTL 294-01

Disease Eradication:Global Health Policy, Practice, and the Challenges of the Polio End Game

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Kata Chillag

Notes: The scale and complexity of disease eradication efforts highlight technical, sociocultural, economic, and political dynamics present in many global health programs. Such efforts present dilemmas and questions common in global health: how to invest limited resources? Whose priorities and what values does a policy or program reflect? What will be the impacts —positive and negative—on health systems, other health and societal problems, and future public health efforts? This course will examine principles of and justifications for disease elimination and eradication initiatives and the technical, sociocultural, and political dimensions of past and current efforts, including smallpox, neglected tropical diseases, and malaria. The centerpiece will be an in-depth examination of the polio eradication initiative and its final stages.

INTL 301-01

Power and Development in Africa

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 333-01; sophomore standing or permission of instructor required*

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem

(e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Cross-listed with Political Science 333. (4 credits)

INTL 364-01

Culture and Revolution

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Cross-listed with RUSS 364-01*

Intermediate Courses

This course examines the relationship between cultural and political change during three very different revolutions: France 1789, Russia 1917, Iran 1979. How do people change when governments are overturned? How do revolutions shape popular consciousness? Do people understand events as revolutionaries intend? To answer these questions, we will examine symbols and political ideologies, mass media, education, social identities, the culture of violence, popular participation and resistance, and other issues. Readings will include revolution-inspiring works of Voltaire and Rousseau, Marx and Lenin, Khomeini and the Koran. We will read sympathetic and antagonistic contemporary accounts, and look at popular culture to see how events were understood. Fashion and etiquette, comics and caricatures, movies and plays will be used. (4 credits)

INTL 368-01

Sustainable Development and Global Future

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Roopali Phadke

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of instructor*

This course examines the history and modern use of "sustainable development" as a framework for international development. Close attention is given to the role of philanthropies, NGOs and social movements in shaping projects and policies. The course examines a range of topics including appropriate technology, microfinance, ecotourism and ecovillages. Prior coursework in international development and/or environmental studies is strongly recommended. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 368. (4 credits)

INTL 381-01

Transnational Latin Americas

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 381-01 and LATI 381-01*

Examines critical and primary literatures concerning the transnational, hemispheric, Atlantic, and Pacific cultures that have intersected in Latin America since the early colonial era, with a particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 381 and Latin American Studies 381

INTL 384-01

Langston Hughes: Global Writer

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and ENGL 384-01*

The great African American writer Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is best known as the poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance. But his career was vaster still. He was a Soviet screenwriter, Spanish Civil War journalist, African literary anthologist, humorist, playwright, translator, social critic, writer of over 10,000 letters, and much more. This course engages Hughes's full career, bridging race and global issues, politics and art, and makes use of little-known archival materials. Cross-listed with American Studies 384 and English 384. (4 credits)

INTL 415-01

Cultural Resistance/Survival: Indigenous and African Peoples in Early Spanish America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Margaret Olsen

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 415-01 and LATI 415-01*

In the Old World, Spain defined its national identity by locating its "others" in Jews, conversos, Muslims, moriscos, Turks, gypsies, pirates and Protestants. In the New World, Spaniards employed many of the same discursive and legal tactics—along with brute force—to subject Amerindian and African peoples to their will and their cultural norms. But indigenous and African populations in the Americas actively countered colonization. They rejected slavery and cultural imposition through physical rebellion, the use of strategies of cultural preservation and the appropriation of phonetic writing, which they in turn wielded against European hegemony. We will examine a fascinating corpus of indigenous pictographic codexes, architecture, myths, and histories and letters of resistance, along with a rich spectrum of texts in which peoples of African descent affirm their own subjectivity in opposition to slavery and cultural violence. What will emerge for students is a complex, heterogeneous vision of the conquest and early colonization in which non-European voices speak loudly on their own behalf. This course satisfies the Area 1 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 415 and Hispanic Studies 415. (4 credits)

INTL 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 477-01; first day attendance required*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 477 and Geography 477. (4 credits)

INTL 485-01

Senior Seminar: Confronting Global Hatred

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Senior seminar*

Students should have at least two courses in international studies including an Introduction to International Studies, or the permission of the instructor. Drawing on several disciplines, this course confronts global hatred from three angles. The first is the hater's internal world and looks at how human nature, genetic structure/instincts, and individual psychology may foster hatred. The second is external, exploring the role history, culture, ideology, social structure, religion, and mass psychology play. The third seeks to apply the insights gained from the first two, asking: how might we break the devastating cycles of hatred so present in our world? Senior standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits.)

INTL 494-01

Global Media Spectacle

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Senior seminar; first day attendance required* What is an event? Events shape international relations. Events occur, but they are also constructed in that events must be mediated in order to be knowable. How are events recognized as events both when they happen and as they are passed on to generations who never witnessed the event? This class will look at what constitutes an event by considering ways in which events have been theorized across disciplines. Then we will work through a few case studies of events and their mediation (some possible events we might consider include hurricane Katrina, the Bhopal gas tragedy, the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the Iran revolution, the bombing of Hiroshima, the fall of the Berlin Wall, September 11th, the circulation of the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse photographs, the earthquake in Haiti) The final third of the course will be run as a writing-workshop in which students will be producing their own capstone papers.

Spring 2018

INTL 111-01

Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. One of the most significant trends of the current era has been globalization: the shrinking of distances, the greater interpenetration of the world's peoples, and the rise, perhaps, of a so-called global culture. Yet it is too simple to say, "it's all a big mix," for the questions of how the mixing is done, and who mixes, are complex. The study of literature illuminates these questions. By reading important recent texts, this course tackles "world" questions: what does it mean to be from a certain place? what is a culture? and who are we in it? We'll work to link our own personal readings with the texts in dialogue with the world. Texts will be drawn from U.S. multicultural, "world," and travel literature, and rich theoretical readings. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-01

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-02

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 252-01

Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 252-01 amd MCST 252-01; first day attendance required*

This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century. In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.” This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations. One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally. (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 credits)

INTL 294-01

INTL Topics Course

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes:

INTL 300-01

Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with WGSS 300-01; first day attendance required*

This course is an in-depth study of some specific theories and methodologies on which contemporary feminist and queer thinkers have based their analysis, critique, and reconstruction of men's and women's roles. Some guiding questions are: What is a nation? Who are its citizens? How do language and gender roles shape the ways we imagine our roles as men and women? Do sexuality or economy affect how we subscribe to or resist political ideologies? In previous offerings, the course has explored the intersection of Postcolonialism (specifically gendered critiques of colonizing sociopolitical structures) with Postmodernism (specifically gendered critiques of language and sexuality). The course will include film, photography, music, and the writings of Butler, Foucault, Chodorow, Kristeva, hooks, Spivak, and Trinh, among others. It offers ways to create links with local community and social-work organizations. (4 credits)

INTL 316-01

Mapping the New World: Explorations, Encounters, and Disasters

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Margaret Olsen

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 316-01 and LATI 316-01; first day attendance required*

Europeans were by no means the first peoples to explore new territories and human populations. Renaissance scientific methodology, however, led European travelers to meticulously document each New World encounter in writing and develop new tools with which to navigate and represent space, devices that subsequently became weapons of colonial domination. But as Nature and indigenous populations refused to be subjected to European epistemology, failure and disaster were frequent events: shipwrecks left Old World survivors stranded among unknown lands and peoples in the Americas; Amerindians rejected the imposition of a foreign culture and religion, murdering colonists and missionaries; Africans rebelled against slavery and escaped to mountains and jungles to form autonomous communities. An examination of maps, exploration logs, missionary histories, travel literature, historiography and colonial documents will provide the foundation for this course on the ambivalent reality of the Old World's encounter with the Americas, in which Europeans were often the losers. This course satisfies the Area 1 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. Cross-listed with Hispanic Studies 316 and Latin American Studies 316. (4 credits)

INTL 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 320-01*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with Political Science 320. (4 credits)

INTL 321-01

Cultures of Neoliberalism

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Morgan Adamson

Notes: *Cross-listed with MCST 321-01*


INTL 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with Political Science 352. (4 credits)

INTL 367-01

Postcolonial Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*

Traces the development of theoretical accounts of culture, politics and identity in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and related lands since the 1947-1991 decolonizations. Readings include Fanon, Said, Walcott, Ngugi and many others, and extend to gender, literature, the U.S., the post-Soviet sphere, and Europe. The course bridges cultural, representational, and political theory. Prior internationalist and/or theoretical coursework strongly recommended. (4 credits) Cross-listed with English 367.

INTL 380-01

Global Leadership

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: ZLeadership is among the deepest features of associational life, pervading every profession and institution, especially in the age of complex global change. Thus this seminar explores leadership. We begin with the relationship between structure and agency, and then focus on vision and invention, integrity and legitimacy, flexibility and decisiveness. Readings draw from Western, Islamic, and Indian sources. The main paper will focus on a major individual from any century or locale, chosen by the student. Open to all but first years. Every fall. (4 credits)

INTL 394-01

Hope: Possible Futures in Impossible Times

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 394-02; first day attendance required*


INTL 489-01

Senior Seminar: Capitalism and World (Dis)Order

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: Capitalism, for many, is synonymous with the "natural" exchange of goods and services through "the free market." But fuller examination shows capitalism to be neither natural, free, nor limited to economic transactions. Capitalism more precisely is a historical social system and a way of being which now penetrates all forms of life: cultural, ecological, civic and more. This senior seminar aims to identify capitalism's origins and development, and interrogate its contemporary status. Thinkers such as Smith, Marx, and Braudel will loom, but readings will focus on works by Beaud, Weber, Tawney, Kotz, Wallerstein, and others. The course concludes with a significant research paper on a topic, relevant to the theme, of a student's choice. Senior standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits)