History

HIST 114 - History of Africa to 1800

A study of the history of Africa before 1800, this course covers the major themes relating to the development of African societies and cultures from the earliest times. Students will engage with themes of state-building, trade and religion as catalysts for change and learn how historians have reconstructed the history of early Africa. This course will provide students with knowledge of specific case studies from North, South, East, West, and Central Africa.

Frequency: Every year.

HIST 115 - Africa Since 1800

This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent.

Frequency: Every year.

HIST 121 - The Greek World

This course surveys the political, economic, and cultural development of the peoples of the ancient Greek world from the late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic era. Students will hone their critical thinking skills while working with translations of ancient literature, archaeological remains and works of art. The basic structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the interaction between physical landscape and historical change; rule by the one, the few and the many; the nature and development of literary and artistic genres; the economic, military, and/or cultural dimensions of empire; or the intersections of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, slave/free status and civic identity in the Greek world.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

CLAS 121

HIST 122 - The Roman World

This course introduces students to the Roman world, which at its height stretched from Britain to Iran, from Germany to Africa, and lasted well over a thousand years. Students will develop critical thinking skills while working with Roman literature in translation, art, architecture and other archaeological remains. The structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the development of Roman literature out of and in response to Greek culture; the effects of the civil wars and the resulting political change from a republic to a monarchy; the cultural, religious and/or military aspects of the Roman empire and its immediate aftermath; Roman conceptions of gender, sexuality, slave and free status, citizenship and/or ethnicity, and how these social categories were used to legitimize or exercise power.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

CLAS 122

HIST 137 - From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to the Civil War

In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S.  Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own.

Frequency: Spring semester.

HIST 140 - Introduction to East Asian Civilization

This course introduces the cultures and societies of China, Japan and Korea from the earliest times to the present day. Primarily an introductory course for beginners in East Asian civilization, this course considers a variety of significant themes in religious, political, economic, social and cultural developments in the region. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Every fall.

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 140

HIST 154 - African Life Histories

In this course we will learn about African history through the stories that Africans themselves have told about their own lives. We will use oral history, songs of West Africa's griots; slave narratives; political autobiographies; theatre and film to explore the personal narration of lived experience. To guide our class discussions we will also consult scholarly essays about life history as a genre, to help us understand the methodology behind the production of these important texts. Class activities will include seminar discussions, writing workshops, a field trip and intermittent background lectures. Each student will carry out an individual research project on their topic of choice.

Frequency: Offered annually.

HIST 164 - Governing the Body: Health/Eugenics/Population Control in Global Perspective

Concerns about health and population transcend both temporal and geographic boundaries. These are problems that have preoccupied governments, colonial armies, international organizations, and individual families throughout history. While disease has affected populations from the earliest days of human civilization, doctors and politicians in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries developed new and different ways of governing bodies. This course traces the dramatic shift from a concern about the transmission of infectious diseases to an overriding fear about the "quality and quantity" of families, workers, and soldiers. Using a global/comparative approach, we will explore themes such as the history of epidemic disease control, population policy and eugenics, and the creation of international health organizations

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 168 - Sex, Love, and Gender in History

This introductory course will use a global/comparative approach to introduce students to the ways that historians think about sex, love, and gender. We will explore themes such as sex and war, the role of the state in shaping people's intimate lives, the intersections between gender, race, and social class, changing courtship practices, and the ways that the politics of sex and gender shaped the evolution of empires and nations. Students will engage with a wide variety of historical sources, including memoirs, poems, novels, art, film, and photography and will engage with a range of theoretical approaches to thinking about sex and gender. This course will emphasize critical reading skills and will also introduce students to the basic tenets of historical research and writing. We will discover together how archives work and, as a final project, students will explore the collections at the Minnesota Historical Society and develop their own individual research projects on the theme of "Sex, Love, and Gender in Global Minnesota."

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

HIST 180 - Going Global: The Experiment of World History

What broad patterns do we see repeated across human cultures and eras? How do current international concerns shape the way we perceive these patterns, and retell the past? This course is an introduction to the youngest and boldest experimenters in the discipline of history: global historians. We follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the planet and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to present day. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural and geographic boundaries. It also forces us to sharply rethink the methodology of traditional historians. Throughout our critical survey of world history we will assess the usefulness (and potential outdatedness) of the concepts of civilization, empire, revolution, and global networks. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the major.

Frequency: Every year.

HIST 181 - Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. Meets the global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Offered every year.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 181

HIST 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

HIST 201 - History of U.S. Feminisms

This is an introductory course about the history of U.S. feminism as it was articulated and experienced in the United States from roughly 1800-1970. We will focus on not only on the experience of those who worked for the cause of women's rights but also the ideologies at home and abroad that influenced feminist thought. In so doing, we will interrogate the myths about feminism and the backlash against it that are central to the history, culture, and politics of the United States. This course is especially concerned with the multiple and contradictory strains within feminism. Topics that the class will consider include: the roots of feminism as it took shape in the anti-slavery movement, the overlap of women's rights and the civil rights movement of the twentieth century, and the women's health movement, among others.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 201

HIST 209 - Civil Rights in the United States

The course examines the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States.  In the class, students will analyze key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.  Throughout the semester, students will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.   

Frequency: Every year

Cross-Listed as

AMST 209 

HIST 213 - Women in African History

The objective of this course is to explore the role that women have played in the development of African history and to understand the major issues that define their experience as women from this region of the world. This course introduces students to the ways in which gender is studied in African history and to the major "break-through" works on women in African history. An important component of this course is the study of life histories of women from various geographical regions of the continent.

Frequency: Alternate years

HIST 219 - In Motion: African Americans in the United States

In Motion is an introduction to modern African American History from slavery to contemporary times. In Motion emphasizes the idea that both African Americans and the stories of their lives in the United States are fluid, varied and continually being reinterpreted. Rather than a strict chronological survey, this course is organized thematically. Some of the important themes include movement/mobility/migration; work/labor; resistance to systems of oppression; gender/sexuality/culture/performance; politics/citizenship; and sites of (re)memory. While the course is geographically situated in the United States, we will also consider African American life, culture, thought and resistance in global perspectives. In this course, students will read important historical texts, both primary and secondary, engage in discussion, and write essays that ask them to critically engage the history of African Americans in the US. Cross-listed with History 219. 4 credits.

Frequency: Every year

Cross-Listed as

AMST 219 

HIST 222 - Imagining the American West

The American West is central to the construction of America's identity and popular culture.  The mythology of the American West, built on a narrow foundation of Euro-American settlement and conquest, is critical to understanding the role of the West in the national narrative of American history. Using a variety of materials, including films, art and photography, literature, and historical sources, this course will examine how writers, artists, actors, settlers, and government officials, among others, shaped the creation of the mythic West.  This course will investigate what - and who - is and is not considered part of this mythology, as well as the ways in which these constructs attempted to make sense of the diverse populations converging in the West.

Frequency: Offered alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 222 

HIST 224 - African American History: Slavery, Emancipation, and Reconstruction

This course explores the Afro-American experience from the villages of West Africa to the cotton plantations of the antebellum South. Considers West African social structure and culture, the international slave trade, the development of racism, the development of American slavery, the transformation of Afro-American culture over more than two centuries, the struggle, the possibilities of reconstruction, and the ultimate rise of share-cropping and segregation.

Frequency: Occasionally

Cross-Listed as

AMST 224

HIST 225 - American Indian History to 1871

The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. European (and, later, Euro-Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands, cultures, religions, politics, and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1871 - the year that Congress stopped making treaties with Native nations - by considering the complicated and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this courses argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience from pre-contact toward the twentieth century.

Frequency: Occasionally.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 225 

HIST 226 - American Indian History since 1871

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continually fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans.

Frequency: Offered spring semester.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 226 

HIST 228 - Gender and Sexuality in Colonial America and the Early Republic

Since the 1960s historians have revisited early American history to identify populations on the margins and historical actors whose stories and experiences were neglected in the traditional canon of history. Historians of women made some of the first forays into this important work of recovery. Building up the foundations produced by women's historians, the field of gender and sexuality studies have flourished and enriched the narratives of American history. This course examines American peoples and cultures from the 16th through early 19th centuries to uncover the ways in which gender and sexuality shaped the formation of an early American society. Particular attention will be given to the way that ideologies of gender and sexuality shaped early concepts of race and the development of North American political institutions.

Frequency: Occasionally

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 228

HIST 229 - Narrating Black Women's Resistance

This course examines traditions of 20th century African American women's activism and the ways in which they have changed over time.  Too often, the narrative of the "strong black woman" infuses stories of African American women's resistance which, coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women's activism. It also aims to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. The course also asks students to consider narrative, voice and audience in historical writing, paying particular attention to the ways in which black women's history has been written over the course of the twentieth century.

Frequency: Every year

Cross-Listed as

AMST 229 and WGSS 229 

HIST 232 - Immigration and Ethnicity in US History

An overview of U.S. history as seen through the experiences of newly arriving and adjusting immigrant groups. This course is designed primarily for students who have no previous college-level background in U.S. history.

Frequency: Occasionally

Cross-Listed as

AMST 232

HIST 234 - U.S. Environmental History

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked.

Frequency: Offered yearly.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 234 

HIST 235 - Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in the Early Modern Atlantic World

This course explores cross-cultural encounters in the Americas that characterized the meetings of Europeans, Africans, and Americans in the early modern world between 1492 and 1763.  During this period, the Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent land masses became critical locations for economic, biological, and cultural exchanges.  This course focuses on the Americas as sites for discovery, mutual incomprehension, and exploitation.  The course explores the ways that conquest, resistance, and strategic cooperation shaped peoples' "new worlds" on both sides of the Atlantic. It also considers how colonialism framed and was framed by scientific inquiry, religious beliefs, economic thought, and artistic expression.  Students interrogate primary sources-written, visual and aural--that emerged from these encounters and the secondary literatures that have sought to make sense of them.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 235 and LATI 235 

HIST 236 - Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century

"Of all the strange beasts that have com slouching into the 20th century," writes James Twitchell, "none has been more misunderstood, more criticized, and more important than materialism." In this course we will trace the various twists and turns of America's vigorous consumer culture across the twentieth century, examining its growing influence on American life, its implications for the environmental health of the world, and the many debates it has inspired.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 236 

HIST 244 - US Since 1945

This course examines the tumultuous changes that define the postwar era in U.S. society and culture. Themes of the course will vary depending on instructor. Topics may include: cultural tensions of the Cold War era, the civil rights movement and Black Power, the women-s movement, postwar prosperity, suburbanization, the Vietnam War, and the New Right.

Frequency: Occasionally

HIST 250 - Science, Magic and Belief

Events of the distant European past continue to shape our modern attitudes towards religion, magic and science. How did people in the sixteenth- and seventeenth- century Atlantic world use these frameworks to make sense of the world around them? In this course we will journey back to the period of the "Scientific Revolution" to investigate how and why people began to distinguish sharply between the three systems. Who lost, and who profited, from this transition? What similarities between religion, magic and science persisted? To understand this turning point, we will compare contemporaneous cases of individuals who practiced magic, science and religion and ran afoul of authorities. Their trials highlight how the three spheres began to diverge. Cases we will consider might include the 1633 trial of Galileo, and the 1663 witchcraft trial of Tempel Anneke in Germany.

Frequency: Every other year.

HIST 251 - Pirates, Translators, Missionaries

Why are cultural intermediaries often remembered as villains or traitors? This course calls the popular stereotype into question by focusing on four dramatic case studies of notorious but pivotal mediators who moved between the Spanish, Aztec, English, French, Kongolese and Portuguese empires of the early modern period. Among others, we will consider conflicting primary source accounts and current scholarship about the Dona Marina, the Mexica translator for the Army of Cortes; Nathaniel Courthope, and English profiteer who made a fortune peddling nutmeg between India and New York; two competing French pirates who sacked the South American port city of Cartagena de Indias twice in a single month; and Dona Beatriz, an Kongolese convert to Christianity who was burned at the stake for professing that she was possessed by the spirit of Saint Anthony. This diverse group of pirates, missionaries and translators walked a similar tightrope between worlds, both liberated and constrained by their border crossings. We will evaluate how gender, race, religion, and imperial loyalties affected the survival of this small group of interlopers, and how, in spite of this, they came to disproportionately influence events in the Atlantic world. This course fulfills both the global/comparative and pre-1800 requirements for the major.

Frequency: Every other year.

HIST 252 - Conversion and Inquisition: Religious Change

What causes people to change their religious beliefs? How have societies handled those who do alter their spiritual attitudes? This course focuses on several dramatic case studies of men and women who self-consciously changed their religion during the turbulent period of imperial encounters between the mid-1500s and the 1700s. Among others, we will examine and interrogate reports of converts to Christianity including Jewish and Muslim prisoners of the Inquisition, captives of Mediterranean pirates, and the nearly canonized Mohawk convert Catherine Tekakwitha. We will consider how violence, national loyalties, gender, charisma, local power dynamics, environmental upheaval, and serendipity affected the choices and fates of these converts. This course fulfills both the global/comparative and pre-1800 requirements for the major.

Frequency: Every other year.

HIST 256 - Transatlantic Slave Trade

This class examines the Atlantic commerce in African slaves that took place roughly between 1500 and 1800. We will explore, among other topics, transatlantic commerce, the process of turning captives into commodities, the gendered dimensions of the slave trade, resistance to the trade, the world the slaves made, and the abolitionist movement on both sides of the Atlantic. Students will read a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a more complex understanding of the slave trade and how it changed over time. Meets the global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 256

HIST 257 - Empires

This course will survey the evolution of modern European empires from their inception in the mid-nineteenth century to their aftermath in the 1980s and 1990s. The course will be organized topically, separate modules being devoted to theory, imperial administration, race and segregation in the colonies, cultural and economic exploitation of colonies, European culture and imperialism, indigenous anti-colonial movements and decolonialization, and the issue of colonialism's role in globalization. Materials will be drawn from the experiences of the British, French, German, Dutch and Russian empires. Lectures, class discussions and films. Essay exams prepared outside of class and quizzes.  Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 258 - Europe Since 1945

A survey of European history from the end of World War II to the present, emphasizing social and economic history and including both western Europe and the former socialist republics of eastern Europe. The course tests the hypothesis that Europe constitutes a social and political entity as well as a geographic one. Among the topics the course will cover are a comparison of European post-World War II reconstruction (East and West), Europe's power decline in a global context, Europe as a tool and a participant in the Cold War, political trends and their roots in social and economic change, and the origins and European-wide implications of the collapse of the socialist states of eastern Europe.

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 259 - Women, Gender, and the Family in Contemporary Europe

This course will explore the ways in which the major events and processes in contemporary European history shaped the lives of women and families as well and the way that both individual women and women's movements have shaped the history of contemporary Europe. Much of our discussion will revolve around the themes of equality and inequality and their evolution over the course of the last two centuries. Our exploration will begin with the French Revolution in 1789 and end with the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe in the late twentieth century. We will focus on issues such as family policy, reproductive rights, labor, immigration, women's political representation, and LGBTQ equality in Europe. We will also explore the importance of children and childhood in the context of contemporary European society and the role that the state has played in shaping the lives of young people. Whenever possible, we will approach the topics at hand by exploring the voices of our historical actors themselves and we will consider the experiences of people from a wide range of identities.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 259 

HIST 260 - Rise/Fall of Tsarist Russia

A survey of the development of Russian social and political institutions from Peter the Great (1682-1724) to 1917. The course will explain the growth of the tsar's authority, the origins and outlooks of Russia's major social/gender groups (nobility, peasants, merchants, clergy, women, minorities, Cossacks) and the relations which grew up between the tsar and his society. The course will conclude with an appraisal of the breakdown of the relationship in 1917, and the tsarist legacy for Russia's social and political institutions in the Soviet Union and beyond.

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 261 - Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art

Through the study of Russian films starting from the silent era up to the present day, the course will explore how storytelling in cinema differs from that in history and fiction, as well as how power relations, technology, and aesthetics shaped cinematic depictions of major historical events in Russia and the Soviet Union, from medieval times to post-Soviet era. Students will view and analyze films that are among the essential Russian contributions to world cinema, by directors including Eisenstein, Tarkovsky, Mikhalkov, and Sokurov. Course readings will draw upon film theory, history, fiction, and memoirs. We will use our readings to create a conceptual framework for examining the films as narratives about real events, as vehicles of propaganda, and as imaginative works of art. In addition to attending weekly film screenings and discussing the films and readings in class, students will give presentations on topics of their choice arranged in consultation with the instructor.

Frequency: Alternate spring semesters.

Cross-Listed as

RUSS 261 

HIST 262 - Soviet Union and Successors

A survey of Russian, Soviet and post-Soviet history from the Russian Revolution to the present. Topics include the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, Bolshevik rule and its tsarist heritage, Soviet "monocratic" society under Lenin and Stalin, dissent in the USSR, the "command economy" in the collapse of Communist political power, and national consciousness as an operative idea in the Commonwealth of Independent States.

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 264 - Public Health in Africa from Empire to Ebola

The 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone has served as an important reminder of the ongoing challenges that public health problems pose in Africa today-both for local governments and institutions as well as for international organizations like the World Health Organization and Doctors without Borders. This course explores the way that questions of health have shaped the African continent from the period of European colonization in the early twentieth century to today. We will explore topics such as the development of colonial public health infrastructure, the emergence of international health and development institutions during the period of African decolonization, and the continuing challenges that independent states in Africa today face dealing with both epidemic disease and preventative care. We will focus on a wide variety of public health issues, including insect-borne diseases like malaria and sleeping sickness, AIDS, cancer, malnourishment and malnutrition, infant and maternal health care, and Ebola. This course will give students a historical as well as a contemporary perspective on public health in African society and politics. In addition to our readings of leading scholars in this field, we will engage with historical documents, literature, and film. We will also continuously engage with contemporary news coverage over the course of the semester.

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 265 - Europe in the Era of World War

Rather than approaching the history of Europe in wartime solely through the lens of military history or the history of international relations, this course will also delve into European culture, politics, and society in the period 1914-1945 and will explore the ways that both world wars profoundly changed the lives of Europeans living at the time, as well as the landscape of Europe itself. We will take a peripatetic approach, diving into different themes in different places and times. We will explore, for example, the lives of a young British nurse and a young German soldier during the First World War. We will grapple with the experiences of a concentration camp survivor during the Holocaust. We will think about the ways that critics of empire drew on the experiences of fascism in the twentieth century to build their case against colonialism. And finally, using more contemporary accounts and news coverage, we will consider the legacies of these two transformative wars and think about how they shape our conceptions of Europe and Europeans today. The class will strongly emphasize the development of research and writing skills. We will engage with a wide range of primary source material and students will conduct historical research on a topic of their choice, culminating in a major research paper that they will present as part of an in-class research conference.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

HIST 266 - European Revolutions, 1789-1917

This course will provide an introduction to the study of history and to European politics, culture, and society in the long nineteenth century from the French Revolution in 1789 to the Russian Revolution in 1917. We will explore a multitude of different kinds of revolutions - including political revolutions, dramatic changes in class and social structure, evolving gender roles for men and women, and the establishment of new empires and nation states. This class will situate these vast changes in Europe in a broad global context and will consider the experiences of people with very different identities, ranging from women fighting for equal rights under the banner of the French Revolution to Russian peasants to African workers in the Belgian Congo. We will challenge traditional notions of what constitutes Europe and we will explore the various transnational connections that linked Europe to the rest of the world.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

HIST 267 - Race and Immigration in Europe

This course will explore the way that questions of race have shaped European society and politics, as well as the ways that immigration has created the uneasily multi-cultural Europe that we know today. We will explore topics such as the origins of immigration policy in interwar Europe, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, race and empire, post-colonial immigration from Africa and Asia, the place of Islam in European society, the emergence of anti-immigration political movements on the extreme right, and we will end the course with a discussion of the current migration crisis in Europe and the connections between European xenophobia and "Brexit." In addition to our readings of leading scholars in this field, we will engage with historical documents, literature, and film, as well as with contemporary European news coverage.

Frequency: Alternate years.

HIST 274 - The Great Tradition in China before 1840

A study of the culture and society of China from earliest times to the eighteenth century, when the impact of the West was strongly felt. The course will feature themes in Chinese history, including the birth of the Great Philosophers, the story of the Great Wall, the making and sustaining of the imperial system, the Silk Road and international trade and cultural exchange, the emergence of Chinese Buddhism and Neo-Confucianism, Genghis Kahn and his Eurasian Empire, the splendid literary and artistic achievements, the Opium War and its impact on modern China. Lecture/discussion format.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 274

HIST 275 - The Rise of Modern China

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, intellectual and cultural changes, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and the rise of China as a world power. Special attention will be given to China's international relations.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 275

HIST 276 - The Great Tradition in Japan before 1853

A survey of the major political, social, religious, intellectual, economic and artistic developments in Japan from earliest times to the opening of Japan in the 1850s. The course will revisit Japan's emperor system, Shintoism, feudalism, Samurai as a class, selective borrowing from China, Korea, and the West, and the background of Japan's rapid modernization after the Meiji Restoration.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 276

HIST 277 - The Rise of Modern Japan

Japan's rapid industrialization in the latter part of the nineteenth century, and its phenomenal rise as the number two economic power in the world after the devastation wrought by World War II, have led many scholars to declare Japan a model worthy of emulation by all "developing" nations. After an examination of feudal Japan, this course probes the nature and course of Japan's "amazing transformation" and analyzes the consequences of its strengths as a nation-state. Considerable study of Japanese art, literature, and religion will be undertaken and American attitudes toward the Japanese and their history will also be examined.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 277

HIST 281 - The Andes: Landscape and Power

This course explores the interaction between landscape and power in Andean history from the colonial period to the present day. The dramatic mountains have both shaped and have been shaped by sociopolitical relations, from the "vertical archipelagos" of ancient Andean peoples to the extractive economies of the Spanish and post-colonial Andean states. The course incorporates analytical perspectives from environmental, cultural, and urban history, alongside eyewitness accounts, to consider the relationship between the natural and built environments, on the one hand, and Andean racial and social identities, on the other. In selected years, this course will involve collaboration with contemporary Andean communities deploying oral history as a means of community and environmental preservation.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 281 and LATI 281 

HIST 282 - Latin America: Art and Nation

This course presents an historical overview of the interaction between artists, the state, and national identity in Latin America. After an introduction to the import of images to crafting collective identities during the colonial era and the 19th century, we will focus on the 20th century. Topics to be discussed include the depiction of race, allegorical landscapes and architectures, the art of revolution, and countercultures. Multiple genres will be explored with an emphasis on the visual arts, architecture, and popular music.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 282

HIST 283 - Amazon: A Cultural History

This course traces depictions of the Amazon rainforest from the 16th century to the present with an emphasis on three central allegories - the Amazon as cultural crossroads; the Amazon as untapped economic resource; and the Amazon as a-historical paradise (or hell).

Frequency: Every other year.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 283 

HIST 284 - Imaging the Modern City

From c.1850-1950 the world's cities transformed as never before. Across the globe, these burgeoning metropolises were reconstituted as massive stages for the economic and cultural transformations of the day - the sites of industrialization, centralized planning, mass transport, and the locus of global migration. This course will trace the broader history of global urbanization during this period with an emphasis on how these processes were represented and imaged by nineteenth and twentieth-century urbanites. How was the modern city conceived as it transformed beyond all recognition? How did the global scope of the modern city impact these images? How were new technologies incorporated into this radical re-imagining of the modern city? And how did these images travel across the globe, themselves spurring further urbanization as they went? Geographically, the class introduces the radical transformation of urban morphology that began in mid-19th century European cities such as Manchester, London, Paris, Vienna and engages the transfer and reinterpretation of such processes on global cities from Kolkata to Moscow to Mexico City to Rio de Janeiro to Chicago and back, often to Paris. The class also engages classic and contemporary urban theory, artistic representations, and other narratives of the modern city.

Cross-Listed as

INTL 284 

HIST 285 - Cold War Latin America

During the Cold War, Latin America was a decidedly "hot zone." This course considers this phenomenon as a result of internal and external pressures, including political and socioeconomic instability, a deep tradition of revolutionary and socialist activism, and the region's conflictive relationship with the United States. The class examines dramatic moments of the Latin American Cold War, such as the overthrow of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, and the Dirty Wars in Chile and Argentina. It also examines less heralded aspects of the Latin American Cold War, such as its important role in fostering transhemispheric solidarities, the creative possibilities of Cold War cultural production, the emergence of a youth counterculture, and the many attempts by Latin Americans across the political spectrum to reject the premise of the Cold War altogether.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 285 

HIST 290 - History: Then and Now

This advanced course is required for majors. It examines the various forms of analysis used by historians through a study of different kinds of historical texts and sources. It provides an opportunity for students to develop the skills and habits of thinking essential to practicing the discipline of history. This course invites students to address some of the myriad questions and controversies that surround such historical concepts as "objectivity," "subjectivity," "truth," "epistemology," and thereby to develop a "philosophy" of history. At the same time, it stresses the acquisition of such historical tools as the use of written, oral, computer and media sources and the development of analytical writing skills. The subject matter for study changes each year. Recent themes of the course have been memory, empires, and class formation.

Frequency: Every year.

HIST 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

HIST 315 - U.S. Imperialism from the Philippines to Viet Nam

In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. Global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Viet Nam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is it different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the "East"? How did they reshape or reconfigure "American" positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements.

Frequency: Spring semester.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 315 and ASIA 315 

HIST 320 - Decolonization

The end of colonialism and the emergence of new independent states in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the Middle East has been one of the most formative processes that has shaped the world we live in today. This research seminar will explore the process of decolonization in the twentieth century as the end of empire was negotiated between colonial states, former colonial subjects and citizens, international organizations, and a plethora of non-state actors. We will research and discuss several case studies of decolonization in different parts of the world, and we will especially emphasize the international dimensions and global interconnectedness that characterized the dismantling of imperial structures and regimes in the course of the twentieth century. Students will produce a twenty-page research paper using primary and secondary sources.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

One prior course in history

HIST 340 - US Urban Environmental History

In the minds of many Americans, cities are places where nature is absent-places where nature exists only in the crevices and on the margins of spaces dominated by technology, concrete, and human artifice. This course confronts this assumption directly, drawing on the scholarship from the relatively young field of urban environmental history to uncover the deep interconnections between urban America and the natural world. Among the other things, we will examine how society has drawn upon nature to build and sustain urban growth, the implications that urban growth has for transforming ecosystems both local and distant, and how social values have guided urbanites as they have built and rearranged the world around them. Using the Twin Cities has a backdrop and constant reference point, we will attempt to understand the constantly changing ways that people, cities, and nature have shaped and reshaped one another throughout American history.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 340

HIST 343 - Imperial Nature: The United States and the Global Environment

Although the United States accounts for just five percent of the world's population, it consumes roughly twenty-five percent of the world's total energy, has the world's largest economy, and is the world's largest consumer and generator of waste. Relative to its size, its policies and actions have had a significantly disproportionate impact on global economic development and environmental health. Mixing broad themes and detailed case studies, this course will focus on the complex historical relationship between American actions and changes to the global environment. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 343 

HIST 350 - Race, Gender, and Medicine

This seminar-style class examines the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in the history of medicine and health in the U.S. Our diverse topics for study include eugenics, sexuality, midwifery, cultural/spiritual healing methods, pandemics, race- and gender-based ailments and medical experiments (such as the science and politics of the birth control pill and the infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment), gender reassignment surgery, and sex-testing in the Olympics. This wide range of topics will prepare students to explore a research topic of their own choosing for a final paper.

Frequency: Offered alternate years.

HIST 353 - Oceans in World History

Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters. Every other year. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the history major.

Frequency: Every other year.

HIST 376 - Public History

This course introduces students to the ways history is being practiced in the public sphere. We will examine a wide array of topics that fall under the rubric of public history including the study of archives, museums, and oral histories. The course may also consider historical reenactment, commemoration, digital history, and the preservation of historical sites. As we explore these topics we will be asking larger questions about who practices history, the role of audience, and the relationship between history and memory.

Frequency: Offered infrequently.

HIST 378 - War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 378

HIST 381 - Transnational Latin Americas

This course examines critical and primary literatures concerning the transnational, hemispheric, Atlantic, and Pacific cultures that have intersected in Latin America since the early colonial era, with a particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

INTL 381 and LATI 381

HIST 382 - Remembering the Modern City

This class interrogates the role that memory and history have played in the formation of modern urban landscapes and identities during the 19th and 20th centuries. Besides introducing theoretical and global case studies, the course considers the layering of metahistorical significance upon sites in the Twin Cities and includes an archival research component. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

Frequency: Offered infrequently.

HIST 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

HIST 490 - Senior Seminar

The senior seminar is taught every fall on themes that cross chronological and geographic lines. Past themes have included Memory, Migration, Gender and Micro-History.

Frequency: Every fall.

HIST 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

HIST 601 - Tutorial

A student or a small group of students may get together with a department member to examine a theme in which the latter has considerable expertise but which is not normally covered in his or her regular courses.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 602 - Tutorial

A student or a small group of students may get together with a department member to examine a theme in which the latter has considerable expertise but which is not normally covered in his or her regular courses.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 603 - Tutorial

A student or a small group of students may get together with a department member to examine a theme in which the latter has considerable expertise but which is not normally covered in his or her regular courses.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 604 - Tutorial

A student or a small group of students may get together with a department member to examine a theme in which the latter has considerable expertise but which is not normally covered in his or her regular courses.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 611 - Independent Project

Students may carry out independent research on specific topics under the supervision of a member of the department with expertise on that particular field. The work should result in an original paper or series of papers. Only one independent study may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 612 - Independent Project

Students may carry out independent research on specific topics under the supervision of a member of the department with expertise on that particular field. The work should result in an original paper or series of papers. Only one independent study may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 613 - Independent Project

Students may carry out independent research on specific topics under the supervision of a member of the department with expertise on that particular field. The work should result in an original paper or series of papers. Only one independent study may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 614 - Independent Project

Students may carry out independent research on specific topics under the supervision of a member of the department with expertise on that particular field. The work should result in an original paper or series of papers. Only one independent study may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 621 - Internship

A student may register for an internship with any member of the department. Off campus learning experiences must have explicit historical content. The student, the faculty sponsor, and the site supervisor will negotiate a learning agreement which specifies the student's goals, means of achieving them, and the manner in which the internship will be evaluated. A standard internship will involve ten hours per week and earn four credits. Only one internship may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

HIST 622 - Internship

A student may register for an internship with any member of the department. Off campus learning experiences must have explicit historical content. The student, the faculty sponsor, and the site supervisor will negotiate a learning agreement which specifies the student's goals, means of achieving them, and the manner in which the internship will be evaluated. A standard internship will involve ten hours per week and earn four credits. Only one internship may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

HIST 623 - Internship

A student may register for an internship with any member of the department. Off campus learning experiences must have explicit historical content. The student, the faculty sponsor, and the site supervisor will negotiate a learning agreement which specifies the student's goals, means of achieving them, and the manner in which the internship will be evaluated. A standard internship will involve ten hours per week and earn four credits. Only one internship may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

HIST 624 - Internship

A student may register for an internship with any member of the department. Off campus learning experiences must have explicit historical content. The student, the faculty sponsor, and the site supervisor will negotiate a learning agreement which specifies the student's goals, means of achieving them, and the manner in which the internship will be evaluated. A standard internship will involve ten hours per week and earn four credits. Only one internship may count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

HIST 631 - Preceptorship

Students may arrange to precept a course with a department member. They will normally be expected to attend the course, do the reading and participate in discussion, look over student writing, and provide guidance or tutor as necessary. Preceptorships do not count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

HIST 632 - Preceptorship

Students may arrange to precept a course with a department member. They will normally be expected to attend the course, do the reading and participate in discussion, look over student writing, and provide guidance or tutor as necessary. Preceptorships do not count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

HIST 633 - Preceptorship

Students may arrange to precept a course with a department member. They will normally be expected to attend the course, do the reading and participate in discussion, look over student writing, and provide guidance or tutor as necessary. Preceptorships do not count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

HIST 634 - Preceptorship

Students may arrange to precept a course with a department member. They will normally be expected to attend the course, do the reading and participate in discussion, look over student writing, and provide guidance or tutor as necessary. Preceptorships do not count toward the ten courses required for a history major.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

HIST 641 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. The independent may be undertaken during a semester, during January, or during the summer.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 642 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. The independent may be undertaken during a semester, during January, or during the summer.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 643 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. The independent may be undertaken during a semester, during January, or during the summer.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.

HIST 644 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. The independent may be undertaken during a semester, during January, or during the summer.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor and department chair.