Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

LATI 181-01

Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 181-01*

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. (4 credits). Cross-listed with History 181.

LATI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Political Science 245. (4 credits)

LATI 249-01

Regional Geog of Latin America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01*

This course explores one of the world's most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments fosters great cultural diversity, as well: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Through projects that explore different elements of Latin America's cultural geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region. (4 credits) Course cross-listed with Geography 249.

LATI 281-01

The Andes: Race, Region, Nation

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 281-01*

This course provides a survey of Andean history with an emphasis upon the formation of collective identities. Class discussion will treat continuities and divergences between the Andean colonial and post-colonial experiences, especially the intersection between racial and regional tensions and their impact upon the emergence and construction of nation-states. Recent topics explored have included the role of landscape in Andean culture, Incan and neo-Incan cultural mythologies, the conflation of racial and class identities in the twentieth century, violence and guerrilla movements, urbanization, and the various shades of indigenismo. (4 credits). Cross-listed with History 281.

LATI 307-01

Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*

This course presents the student with essential tools for the critical analysis of a broad range of topics and forms of cultural production (literature, cinema, art, e-texts, etc) in the Hispanic world. It also teaches the student advanced language skills in written composition and public oral presentation. (4 credits)

LATI 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 228
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with American Studies and Hispanic Studies. (4 credits)

LATI 394-01

Science, Empire and Visual Culture

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 394-01; prerequisite of one History course or permission of instructor* This advanced seminar investigates the ongoing feedback loop between scientific measurement, techniques of visualization, and global empires in the early modern and modern world. Beginning with the expansion of optical science in the late medieval era and the development of “linear” perspective in the Renaissance, the ability to measure, describe and visualize distant geographical realms became a crucial ally to the knowledge and administration of empire. The course will focus particularly on the interaction of these forces during imperial and scientific exploration, especially during the 18th and 19th centuries. Case studies will include astronomical, botanical, and geographic studies in the early modern French and Spanish Atlantic empires, the Napoleonic survey of Egypt, the American journeys of Alexander von Humboldt, the Great Surveys of the US West and 19th-century polar expeditions. In each case, we will consider the relationship between measurement, visualization, collection, display, aesthetics, technology and coloniality.

Fall 2017

LATI 171-01

Susurros del Pasado: Whispers Toward the 21st Century

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Galo Gonzalez

Notes: *First Year Course only; Cross-listed with HISP 171-01*

The course “Susurros del Pasado: Whispers toward the 21st Century” will explore the definition of “Indigenous peoples” and its implication within the context of the Americas, and provide a forum for discussion of the suffering, oppression and discrimination experienced by this particular population. The course will also outline continuing struggle for freedom, for cultural and even their physical survival, by examining specific literature and cultural production authored by 20th and 21st century indigenous and non-indigenous authors from North, Central and South America. The chosen literature and cultural texts will illustrate trans-cultural and de-colonization processes, and resistance to assimilation.

The following authors and films will be the source of our readings and class discussion: Sherman Alexie (The Toughest Indian in the World, 2000), Jose Maria Arguedas (Yawar Fiesta, 1941), Victor Montejo (Testimony: Death of a Guatemalan Village, 1987; and Sculpted Stones, 1995), Rigoberta Menchú (I Rogoberta Menchú. An Indian Woman in Guatemala, 1983), and Subcomandante Marcos (Questions And Swords. Folktales of the Zapatista Revolution, 2001); among the films, "Spirit: The Seventh Fire (2005)," "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (2007)," "Cabeza de Vaca (1993)," "The Mission (1986)," and "A Place Called Chiapas (1998)." Students will also read and discuss theories proposed by Erica-Irene Daes (United Nations Human Rights Prize 1993), Ronald Niezen, Walter Mignolo, Jeffrey Sissons, among others. This course fulfills the WA (Argumentative Writing) requirement. Students will have the opportunity to learn how to construct a solid argumentative assay. They will receive instruction on the various steps of the processes of writing and revising an essay. Through the use of a variety of resources, students will practice methods of selecting themes, setting up solid arguments based on solid evidence, and reaching relevant conclusions in relation to the argumentative intention of the essay. This course is conducted in English.

Goals:

The goals of the First Year Course are the following:

•To introduce students to critical inquiry in the field of Hispanic and Latin American Studies.

•To provide some instruction in college level writing (including multiple drafts and appropriate citation of source materials) and library skills.

•To help students adjust to Macalester's academic life.

•To connect first year students with a faculty member who serves him/her as an advisor for the first two years at Macalester.

•To provide a supportive community of other first year students with shared interests and experiences to help in the transition to college.

Evaluation:

The work for this course consists of: extensive readings, research exercises, writing essays, and a combination of lectures, group and individual presentations, and class discussions. Students will be evaluated on the basis of:

1. Class partic

LATI 181-01

Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 181-01*

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. (4 credits). Cross-listed with History 181.

LATI 249-01

Regional Geog of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with GEOG 249-01; first day attendance required* This course explores one of the world’s most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments also fosters great cultural diversity: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Since this is a first-year course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in written and oral communication, scholarly research, and information literacy. Through research projects that explore different elements of Latin America’s geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region.

Class meets TR, 8:00 am - 9:30 am in Carnegie 05

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


LATI 285-01

Cold War Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 285-01*

During the Cold War, Latin America was a decidedly "hot zone." This course considers this phenomenon as a result of internal and external pressures, including political and socioeconomic instability, a deep tradition of revolutionary and socialist activism, and the region's conflictive relationship with the United States. The class examines dramatic moments of the Latin American Cold War, such as the overthrow of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, and the Dirty Wars in Chile and Argentina. It also examines less heralded aspects of the Latin American Cold War, such as its important role in fostering transhemispheric solidarities, the creative possibilities of Cold War cultural production, the emergence of a youth counterculture, and the many attempts by Latin Americans across the political spectrum to reject the premise of the Cold War altogether. Cross-listed with History 285. 4 credits

LATI 294-03

Revolution and Counterrevolution in Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 294-02*


LATI 307-01

Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Teresa Mesa Adamuz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*

This course presents the student with essential tools for the critical analysis of a broad range of topics and forms of cultural production (literature, cinema, art, e-texts, etc) in the Hispanic world. It also teaches the student advanced language skills in written composition and public oral presentation. (4 credits)

LATI 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Galo Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with American Studies and Hispanic Studies. (4 credits)

LATI 381-01

Transnational Latin Americas

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 381-01 and INTL 381-01*

Examines critical and primary literatures concerning the transnational, hemispheric, Atlantic, and Pacific cultures that have intersected in Latin America since the early colonial era, with a particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. (4 credits) Cross-listed with International Studies 381 and History 381

LATI 415-01

Cultural Resistance/Survival: Indigenous and African Peoples in Early Spanish America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Margaret Olsen

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 415-01 and INTL 415-01; first day attendance required*

In the Old World, Spain defined its national identity by locating its "others" in Jews, conversos, Muslims, moriscos, Turks, gypsies, pirates and Protestants. In the New World, Spaniards employed many of the same discursive and legal tactics—along with brute force—to subject Amerindian and African peoples to their will and their cultural norms. But indigenous and African populations in the Americas actively countered colonization. They rejected slavery and cultural imposition through physical rebellion, the use of strategies of cultural preservation and the appropriation of phonetic writing, which they in turn wielded against European hegemony. We will examine a fascinating corpus of indigenous pictographic codexes, architecture, myths, and histories and letters of resistance, along with a rich spectrum of texts in which peoples of African descent affirm their own subjectivity in opposition to slavery and cultural violence. What will emerge for students is a complex, heterogeneous vision of the conquest and early colonization in which non-European voices speak loudly on their own behalf. This course satisfies the Area 1 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. Cross-listed with Hispanic Studies 415 and International Studies 415. (4 credits)

LATI 436-01

Spanish Dialectology

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Cynthia Kauffeld

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 436-01 and LING 436-01*

A survey of modern dialectal variations of Spanish that includes examination of American Spanish dialects as well as those of the Iberian Peninsula. Sociolinguistic issues and historical aspects of dialect variation and study will be addressed, along with other extralinguistic factors. Through this course, students will be provided an introduction to theories of language change, as well as the history of the language, and will gain a broad understanding of the different varieties of Modern Spanish. (4 credits)

LATI 445-01

Frontera: The U.S./Mexico Border

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 445-01 and HISP 445-01; first day attendance required*

The border region between the United States and Mexico exists as both a physical space and an ideological construct. This seminar uses literary and filmic narratives to explore issues of identity, opportunity, and violence that arise from this contested space. How does the border shape individual and cultural identities? In what ways does the border create opportunities for both advancement and exploitation? How do these works engage conflicts and tensions of race, nationalism, gender, and power? The course will include writers and filmmakers from both countries, and we will read original texts both in Spanish and English. Cross-listed with Hispanic Studies 445 and Latin American Studies 445. (4 credits)

LATI 488-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *First day attendance required*

An integrative, research-oriented capstone which gathers senior majors of diverse regional and disciplinary focuses during the final semester. A faculty convener will integrate a schedule of issue-area seminars, faculty methods and topics presentations, talks by visiting speakers, and student reports on research projects. The course culminates in a lengthy final paper. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

LATI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Political Science 245. (4 credits)

LATI 294-01

Revolutionary Women in Latin America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jesse Zarley

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-01*


LATI 294-02

Afro Latin American History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jesse Zarley

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-02*


LATI 307-01

Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Galo Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*

This course presents the student with essential tools for the critical analysis of a broad range of topics and forms of cultural production (literature, cinema, art, e-texts, etc) in the Hispanic world. It also teaches the student advanced language skills in written composition and public oral presentation. (4 credits)

LATI 308-01

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Alicia Munoz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*

This course provides an interdisciplinary discussion of the Latino experience in the United States with a focus on Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Cuban- Americans. Using fiction, poetry, films and critical essays, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, language, identity, gender and sexuality, politics, and immigration. Course cross-listed with American Studies and Hispanic Studies. (4 credits)

LATI 316-01

Mapping the New World: Explorations, Encounters, and Disasters

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Margaret Olsen

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 316-01 and INTL 316-01*

Europeans were by no means the first peoples to explore new territories and human populations. Renaissance scientific methodology, however, led European travelers to meticulously document each New World encounter in writing and develop new tools with which to navigate and represent space, devices that subsequently became weapons of colonial domination. But as Nature and indigenous populations refused to be subjected to European epistemology, failure and disaster were frequent events: shipwrecks left Old World survivors stranded among unknown lands and peoples in the Americas; Amerindians rejected the imposition of a foreign culture and religion, murdering colonists and missionaries; Africans rebelled against slavery and escaped to mountains and jungles to form autonomous communities. An examination of maps, exploration logs, missionary histories, travel literature, historiography and colonial documents will provide the foundation for this course on the ambivalent reality of the Old World's encounter with the Americas, in which Europeans were often the losers. This course satisfies the Area 1 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. Cross-listed with Hispanic Studies 316 and International Studies 316. (4 credits)

LATI 422-01

Modern Hispanic Novel and the Visual Arts

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Antonio Dorca

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 422-01*

We use an interdisciplinary approach to narrative that focuses on the cooperation between the written and the visual text. For example, how did nineteenth-century painting influenced the novel? Or, what are the connections between cinematic adaptations of narratives? We also consider the perennial dilemma of literal versus personal interpretation. This course satisfies the Area 2 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. Cross-listed as Hispanic Studies 422. (4 credits)