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Spring 2017

POLI 100-01

US Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Thomas Pryor

Notes: An analysis of the major ideas, actors, institutions, and processes that shape the formulation and execution of public policy in the United States. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 120-01

International Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Charmaine Chua

Notes: This course has three broad goals. The first is to develop the foundational knowledge and conceptual literacy necessary to engage with International Relations' multidimensional concerns. These include issues such as world order, power, hierarchy, political violence, international law, development, religion, human rights, gender, humanitarianism and international organizations (such as the United Nations). The second is to introduce students to the different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of international relations (also known as global or world politics), including realist, liberal, constructivist, historical materialist, postcolonial and feminist approaches. The third is to encourage students to reflect on some of the ethical issues inherent in both the study and practice of international politics. Emphasis will also be placed on developing a range of critical, analytical, research and writing skills required for the further study of international politics. The course is thus intended to prepare students for advanced work in the field, although it is also appropriate for those merely seeking to satisfy an interest in the study of global politics. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 140-01

Comparative Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: In Comparative Politics we use comparison to analyze political outcomes within and across countries, Why do Mexican presidents exercise strong centralized authority while Brazilian presidents must contend with powerful governors? Why do Muslims and Hindus fight in some Indian states but not in others? Why does Rwanda have such a high proportion of female legislators whereas the U.S. has such a low proportion? When confronted with large-scale protests in their cities, do state security forces in China, Russia, and the United States respond with similar methods or do they differ? Through comparative analysis, students will learn to describe diverse political institutions, to propose explanations for divergent outcomes, and to evaluate scholarly and popular arguments about politics. (4 credits)

POLI 160-01

Foundations of Political Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Charmaine Chua

Notes: An examination of the evolution of fundamental western political ideas from the Greeks to the present. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 204-01

Urban Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: American urban politics, emphasizing urban policy problems, planning and decision-making . Politcal Science 100 recommened.

POLI 212-01

Rights and Wrongs: Litigation and Public Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: This course explores the significance, possibilities and limits of litigation as a way of shaping public policy and society. Focusing mainly in the American context, the course connects two braod areas of interest: the rise of rights movements in the 20th century (from the NAACP to contemporary movements such as gay rights) and the use of class action lawsuits and tort law to compensate people for injuries or risk, especially in matters affecting public health (e.g. asbestos, tobacco). Related subjects discussed include the historical roots of litigation as an approach to social problems and government regulation as an alternative to litigation. (4 credits)

POLI 215-01

Environmental Politics/Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Roopali Phadke

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

This course provides an introduction to the field of Environmental Politics and Policy. Using a comparative approach, the course engages the meaning and development of environmental governance. We will explore the tandem rise of the modern environmental movement and profound new environmental legislation in the U.S. and internationally. Topics investigated will include: deforestation, hazardous wastes, climate change, population growth, and loss of biodiversity. Fall semester. (4 credits)

POLI 216-01

Legislative Politics

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Julie Dolan

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

This course explores legislative politics through a combination of academic theory and focused field experiences. Each student must simultaneously enroll in a credit-bearing internship at the Minnesota State Legislature. The class examines the basic structures, players and forces that shape legislative decision-making, the motivation or individual legislators, and their interactions with other political actors and institutions. This course is not available to First Year students. (4 credits)

POLI 222-01

Regional Conflict and Security: The Asia-Pacific Region

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes: This is a seminar on the challenges posed to US interests in the Asia-Pacific region, with a particular emphasis on the rise of China as an economic and military power, the “normalization” of Japan as a security actor, and on the challenges posed by North Korea to regional peace and security. It is organized around the following questions: What are the interests motivating US involvement in the Asia-Pacific? What are the challenges to US global and regional interests in the region? How well is the current US policy/strategy working to advance those interests? What realistic military, political, economic and diplomatic options are available to the US in the region? What strategic choices would you advise the Obama administration to make if it is to advance/defend key American interests in the region?

Throughout, seminar participants will approach these questions from the perspective of American policy practitioners seeking to craft a comprehensive strategy that advances US interests in the region and the world. The goal is not only to deepen participants’ understanding of the complexities of the security challenges in the region, but also to enhance their appreciation of challenges faced by the public officials charged with dealing with those complexities.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable to all students seeking to satisfy an interest in US foreign policy and/or the security situation in the Asia-Pacific region.


POLI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 245. (4 credits)


POLI 261-01

Feminist Political Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Zornitsa Keremidchieva

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 261-01*

Analysis of contemporary feminist theories regarding gender identity, biological and socio-cultural influences on subjectivity and knowledge, and relations between the personal and the political. (4 credits). Cross-listed with Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 261.

POLI 267-01

Liberal and Conservative Political Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes: This course deals with the liberal and conservative currents(s) running through the Western tradition of political thought from the time of the French Revolution to today. Its main goal of to provide a solid introduction to these two bodies of philosophical speculation. Through a close reading of texts and commentaries, we will critically (though empathetically) examine the relevant works of thinkers such as John Locke, Thomas Paine, Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill, John Henry Newman, Russell Kirk, William F. Buckley Jr., Leo Strauss, John Dewey, Friedrich von Hayek, Irving Kristol, Michael Oakshott, and Alasdair MacIntyre. The focus of our inquiries will be upon topics such as “how should I lead my life?” (ethics), and “how should we lead our lives together?” (politics).

Important secondary goals of the course include:

1. Familiarizing students with the various “languages” or “idioms” of conservative and liberal political thought;

2. Helping students understand the great political debates between conservative and liberals.

3. Applying both conservative and liberal political frames/concepts to a range of contemporary “hot-button” social and political issues.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in liberal and conservative political thought.

POLI 269-01

Empirical Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: Strategies and tactics of design, observation, description, and measurement in contemporary political research. (4 credits) Empirical Methods: The department requires its majors to take one course in empirical research methodology, preferably before their junior year. There are a number of courses that fulfill this requirement, including: Political Science 269 (Empirical Research Methods), Political Science 272 (Researching Political Communication), Sociology 269 (Science and Social Inquiry), Sociology 270 (Interpretive Social Research), Sociology 275 (Comparative-Historical Sociology). In some cases, research methods courses taken in other social science disciplines may be used to fulfill this requirement following approval by the political science department chair.

POLI 294-01

The Politics of Fear and Hope: Africa from Colonial Times to the “Cheetah Generation”

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 101
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: The popular image of Africa is one of poverty, violence, and dictatorship. However, these outcomes vary over space and time. Why are some parts of Africa more politically and economically successful than others? Why are civil wars ending? Why is inequality rising? What is the significance of an emerging generation of “cheetahs”—young Africans with an entrepreneurial spirit and distaste for the corrupt political establishment? This is a course for students of all levels who wish to answer such questions. It will introduce concepts that are central to the study of African politics: neopatrimonialism, coethnicity, “politics of the belly,” and more.

POLI 294-04

Blood, Borders, and Belonging

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: This course examines the politics of nationality and nationalism in border zones. How do legal borders and maps define national identity? Does it matter whether the borders are endogenous or colonial, old or new, porous or fortified? Is conflict inevitable when national and state borders do not align? How do allegiances change when borders shift? We will read theoretical and empirical texts from political science, geography, history, anthropology, and law. Examples will span world regions.

POLI 294-05

Defining Black Politics Then and Now: Black Political Leadership/Mvts for Racial Equity

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Brittany Lewis

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 294-04* This course will study Black political leadership and the politics of agenda setting in and outside social movements from the 19th to the 21st century. The course will start with first asking, Is President Barack Obama a Black leader or a leader who happens to be Black? And why does that matter to the Black community and its racial equity agenda? The exploration of this contemporary debate aims to illuminate the contentious political terrain that Obama enters as he walks on the heels of countless Black leaders before him. We will then dive immediately into questioning what then is Black politics? And what is the crisis of Black leadership then and now? This initial framing will guide the course as we review various periods of Black political development and the philosophical ruptures that existed between individuals, movements, and shifts in the U.S. political and economic landscape necessitating a new political agenda.

POLI 294-06

Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: *Cross-listed with PHIL 321-01* This course will focus on some central topics in contemporary Anglo-American (or "analytic") social and political philosophy. Likely topics would include an examination of John Rawls's theory of justice and the work of critics of that theory, the value of equality, and issues about global justice.

POLI 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Charmaine Chua

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required; cross-listed with INTL 320-01*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with International Studies 320. (4 credits)


POLI 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with International Studies 352. (4 credits)

POLI 390-01

Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

In his 40-year career at Macalester, Professor Chuck Green functioned as a one-man `leadership academy,¿ inspiring and guiding students to make the transition from detached observers to engaged citizens. Through his teaching, mentoring, and example, Professor Green instilled in students a sense of confidence and optimism about their ability to engage proactively in the world. The Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship honors this legacy. Students with sophomore or junior standing may apply for this seven-month fellowship that includes a spring seminar and a full-time, fully-funded summer field experience. Chuck Green Fellows will study democratic engagement in social and organizational change, identify a client organization working for the public good with whom the student can analyze and address a problem, and then work with that client on a mutually agreed-upon solution. The Fellowship culminates in the early fall with an event in which Fellows, faculty, and clients have an opportunity to reflect on the fellowship experience. The Fellowship fulfills both the practicum and advanced course requirements of the political science major. Contact the political science department for a full description and application. (4 credits)

POLI 394-01

Policymaking in the 4th Branch

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Julie Dolan

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required* Six years before the national controversy over transgender bathrooms erupted in 2016, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton quietly changed State Department rules to allow transgender individuals to register their gender identity on their passports. As an unelected official, how could she enact such a sweeping policy change? This course examines the role that members of the federal bureaucracy, like Secretary Clinton, play in setting policy agendas, writing rules and regulations that have the force of law, implementing laws on the books, enforcing compliance with existing laws, and expanding opportunities for Americans to participate in governance. Employing over 2 million civil servants and thousands of presidential appointees, the fourth branch of government plays a major role in US policymaking today, but in ways that are largely invisible to the public.

POLI 394-02

Immigrants and Refugees in Minnesota: Research Praticum

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Zornitsa Keremidchieva

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required* Through a collaboration with the International Institute of Minnesota and the Immigration History Research Center, this research practicum will provide you with an intimate view of the past and current pathways of immigrants and refugees in Minnesota. You will develop skills in archival research, digital liberal arts tools, and narrative analysis as we work to recreate, communicate, and draw lessons from the the complex experiences of individuals and groups of people who have made Minnesota the diverse and dynamic state that it is today. Through our collaborative research, we will explore the palpable ways in which immigration policies and procedures shape human lives. We will then juxtapose our findings to common public narratives about immigrants and refugees in the U.S. and discuss the ethical boundaries and obligations of engaged scholarship.

POLI 394-04

Boundaries of Political Community: Political Theory Appr to Human, Animals and Cyborgs

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Althea Sircar

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required* Why do non-human animals and other beings matter for politics? How do we understand the political subject or the idea of citizenship in an increasingly hybrid and technological world? How do human beings relate to other living and non-living entities? These questions have deep roots. Human beings have defined themselves in relation to animals, plants, gods, and machines for a very long time. In addition, while many claim that they can explain “human nature,” there is a lot of disagreement in science, philosophy, religion, literature, and politics about what this “nature” is. At the same time, ecological and technological change continue to shape our understanding of the interdependence of human, animal, and plant life. Just as social theorists have argued for millennia about the most ethical and harmonious ways to structure human societies, twenty-first century thinkers are asking about what it

means to live in societies comprised of humans, animals, cyborgs, and possible hybrids of these. We will join these thinkers in this project, examining relationships between humans and nonhuman entities from multiple perspectives. Our readings will range from the ancient to very contemporary. Since these questions matter in many parts of social life, we will consider how cinematic, literary, and visual representations of the human and its boundaries relate to the ongoing project of defining who and what matters in politics.


POLI 404-01

Honors Colloquium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required; 2 credit course*

A workshop for students pursing honors projects in the political science department. S/N grading only. (2 credits)


Fall 2017

POLI 100-01

Foundations of US Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: An analysis of the major ideas, actors, institutions, and processes that shape the formulation and execution of public policy in the United States. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 120-01

Foundations of International Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: *First Year Course only*

This course has three broad goals. The first is to develop the foundational knowledge and conceptual literacy necessary to engage with International Relations' multidimensional concerns. These include issues such as world order, power, hierarchy, political violence, international law, development, religion, human rights, gender, humanitarianism and international organizations (such as the United Nations). The second is to introduce students to the different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of international relations (also known as global or world politics), including realist, liberal, constructivist, historical materialist, postcolonial and feminist approaches. The third is to encourage students to reflect on some of the ethical issues inherent in both the study and practice of international politics. Emphasis will also be placed on developing a range of critical, analytical, research and writing skills required for the further study of international politics. The course is thus intended to prepare students for advanced work in the field, although it is also appropriate for those merely seeking to satisfy an interest in the study of global politics. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 120-02

Foundations of International Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: This course has three broad goals. The first is to develop the foundational knowledge and conceptual literacy necessary to engage with International Relations' multidimensional concerns. These include issues such as world order, power, hierarchy, political violence, international law, development, religion, human rights, gender, humanitarianism and international organizations (such as the United Nations). The second is to introduce students to the different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of international relations (also known as global or world politics), including realist, liberal, constructivist, historical materialist, postcolonial and feminist approaches. The third is to encourage students to reflect on some of the ethical issues inherent in both the study and practice of international politics. Emphasis will also be placed on developing a range of critical, analytical, research and writing skills required for the further study of international politics. The course is thus intended to prepare students for advanced work in the field, although it is also appropriate for those merely seeking to satisfy an interest in the study of global politics. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 140-01

Foundations of Comparative Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: How did state-building in Europe, Africa, and Latin America differ? Does the rise of right-wing nationalist governments in the UK, India, and the United States stem from similar or different causes? Do legislatures with a higher proportion of women lawmakers make different laws? What explains electoral violence in Kenya and Colombia? How do authoritarian regimes use elections to strengthen their grip on power? Comparison is a powerful analytical tool for understanding such political phenomena. In this course, students will learn to apply the comparative method to historical and contemporary problems in global politics, with particular focuses on state-building, democracy and dictatorship, and civil war.

POLI 160-01

Foundations of Political Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: *First Year Course only*

An examination of the evolution of influential political concepts and theories from ancient cultures to the present day, by those writing in/from/to the West. Introduction through textual analysis to historical and contemporary understandings of key terms such as authority, legitimacy, liberty, republicanism, democracy, revolution and “the good.” Additionally, the course provides an introduction to political theory methods of analysis and critique, through the development of skills in reading, critical thinking, and writing. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 200-01

Women and American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Julie Dolan

Notes: This course examines the evolutionary role of women in politics as voters, citizens, candidates, and leaders from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the present. Drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives, we examine women's historical and contemporary roles in U.S. politics, investigate and debate a variety of public policy issues of particular concern to women, and explore the intersection of race and gender in U.S. politics. (4 credits)


POLI 203-01

Politics and Inequality: American Welfare State

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 203-01*

Americans, at least since the Founding era, have cherished the ideal of political equality. Unlike European nations, the United States did not inherit economic class distinctions from a feudal past. But time and again, American social reformers and mass movements have highlighted inconsistencies between the value of equality and the actual practice of democracy. Through the extension of rights to citizens who were previously excluded or treated as second-class citizens, such as women and African Americans, the polity has become more inclusive. But over the last three decades American citizens have grown increasingly unequal in terms of income and wealth. The central question posed by this course is the implications of such vast economic inequality for American democracy. Do these disparities between citizens curtail, limit, and perhaps threaten the functioning of genuinely representative governance? In this course will 1) Explore what other social scientists, mostly economists and sociologists, know about contemporary inequality, particularly in terms of its causes, manifestation, and socio-economic effects; 2) Consider the concept of inequality in political theory and in American political thought, and; 3) Examine the current relationship between economic inequality and each of three major aspects of the American political system: political voice, representation, and public policy. Cross-listed as American Studies 203. (4 Credits)


POLI 205-01

Politics and Policymaking

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: This course examines the American public policy process through a case study approach. Attention will be paid to issues of policy formation and implementation with a focus on the role and interaction of national and state institutions. The United States government is a large, complex system of multiple institutions that share power and authority and govern across multiple issue dimensions. To understand the policy process in this context we will 1) Discuss foundational theories of the policy process; 2) Examine several case studies designed to engage these theories and debate their practical application, and 3) Become “experts” in a particular policy area as each student prepares a presentation on that topic and presents politically viable solutions. This course will focus on writing for a variety of audiences and leave students well-prepared to apply for policy-oriented scholarships, fellowships and jobs. Offered only in the fall. (4 Credits)

POLI 206-01

US Constitutional Law and Thought

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: An exploration of the structure of the American political system as seen through the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics include the separation of powers in the federal government, the scope of executive power, and the development of federal-state relations over the course of American history. The material also includes the nature of judicial review, economic rights and contemporary questions about the limits of government power. Political Science 100 recommended. (4 credits)

POLI 215-01

Environmental Politics/Policy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Roopali Phadke

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of call with permission of the instructor*

This course provides an introduction to the field of Environmental Politics and Policy. Using a comparative approach, the course engages the meaning and development of environmental governance. We will explore the tandem rise of the modern environmental movement and profound new environmental legislation in the U.S. and internationally. Topics investigated will include: deforestation, hazardous wastes, climate change, population growth, and loss of biodiversity. Fall semester. (4 credits)

POLI 221-01

Global Governance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to global governance. It begins with a discussion of the concept of global governance. It then turns to some of the central features of contemporary global governance, including the changing status of the state and of international/world organizations and the role of global civil society. The emphasis here is on how patterns of global governance have changed and are changing and on the implications of these changes for democracy, social justice, etc. The remainder of the course focuses on the areas of international peace and security, human rights and international humanitarian law, and economic governance. By addressing such topics as the International Criminal Court and the role of the IMF and the World Bank in economic development, these parts of the course highlight the contested nature of global governance in each of the three issue areas. Political Science 120 recommended.(4 credits)

POLI 242-01

Political Economy of Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: This course will help you answer questions about politics and economics in the developing world. For example: What explains global disparities in peace and prosperity? Is democracy good for the poor? Does foreign aid work? Our main objective is to use social science to describe and explain development outcomes. Although we will also address what can be done to solve problems such as poverty and civil war, this course will not provide any panaceas. If you finish the term unsatisfied and frustrated, you will have done something right! You will have begun to understand the complexity of development issues, which will equip you to contribute in a sophisticated way to ongoing scholarly and policy-oriented debates. (4 credits)

POLI 250-01

Comparative-Historical Sociology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Terry Boychuk

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 275-01*

The course introduces students to principles of cross-national and cross-cultural analysis. The class begins with a survey of the basic methodological orientations that distinguish various modes of analysis in the social sciences. The lectures and discussions in this section provide a general introduction to the logic of causal analysis, explore the relative strengths and weaknesses of differing methodological approaches to understanding social phenomena, and specifically, consider in greater detail the distinctive blend of theoretical, methodological, and empirical concerns that inform comparative-historical social science. The substantive topics of the course include: the Social Origins of the Modern State; the Sociology of Democracy and Authoritarianism; the Sociology of Revolution; and The Rise of the Welfare State. (4 credits)


POLI 265-01

Work, Wealth, Well-Being

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: Wealth has held an allure for many modern thinkers; the creation of a wealthy society often associated with "civilization" itself. The relationships among work, wealth and well-being are a perennial concern and have been central to the study of political economy, since its inception in the mid- to late-18th century. How does work produce wealth for the individual and for society? How, or when, does individual and social wealth translate into individual and/or social well-being? And, how does the character of work affect individual well-being or happiness? This course will examine the answers given to these questions (and myriad corollary questions) by writers within the political economy tradition. (4 credits)

POLI 266-01

Medieval Political Thought

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes: This course deals with the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050 - c. 1550). This body of thought is worthy of sustained study for two reasons. First, it is one of the glories of human civilization. In seeking to answer the timeless question "how we should live our lives as individuals" and "how we should live together in peace and justice" late medieval political thinkers produced a body of political thought second to none in the history of human philosophical speculation. Second, late medieval political thought is worthy of study because it gave rise to many of the concepts that continue to shape our collective lives today (including state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, "the people," nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights). Indeed, it is impossible to really understand contemporary political life without delving deeply into the way in which late medieval thinkers engaged with the big political issues of their day.

The main goal of this course is to provide a solid introduction to the political thought of this crucially important era in human history. In it, we will critically examine the relevant works of thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Paris, Marsilius of Padua, Bartolus of Sasseferato, and Baldus de Ubaldi. To the extent that they shed light on late medieval thought, we will also touch on classical political theorists such as Aristotle and Cicero as well as Muslim and Jewish thinkers such as ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rusd. (4 credits)


POLI 269-01

Empirical Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: Strategies and tactics of design, observation, description, and measurement in contemporary political research. (4 credits) Empirical Methods: The department requires its majors to take one course in empirical research methodology, preferably before their junior year. There are a number of courses that fulfill this requirement, including: Political Science 269 (Empirical Research Methods), Political Science 272 (Researching Political Communication), Sociology 269 (Science and Social Inquiry), Sociology 270 (Interpretive Social Research), Sociology 275 (Comparative-Historical Sociology). In some cases, research methods courses taken in other social science disciplines may be used to fulfill this requirement following approval by the political science department chair.

POLI 272-01

Researching Political Communication

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Adrienne Christiansen

Notes: A study of how presidents, politicians, and social movement activists worldwide use language and persuasive symbols to increase influence and affect political change. Students complete a semester-long project in which they analyze a significant political text utilizing descriptive-analytic, historical-contextual, critical, and interpretive research methods. (4 credits)

POLI 285-01

Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 285-01*

This course explores ethnic nationalism's causes and consequences in Eastern Europe. Drawing on several disciplines, we begin by examining the core concepts and theories in the contemporary study of nationalism. We then explore both the historical roots of Eastern European nationalisms, and their implications for democracy, minority inclusion, regional stability, and European integration. Cross-listed with International Studies 285. (4 credits)

POLI 294-01

Revolutionary Political Theory

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Althea Sircar

Notes: This political theory course examines how revolutionary movements in political thought intersect with and inflect revolutionary moments in history. Taking "revolutionary" to be descriptive of both events and theoretical frameworks, the course will study how political actors have articulated and enacted abolitionist, feminist, egalitarian, and anti-colonialist revolutionary perspectives. Topics covered will include: the American, French, Haitian, Bolshevik, Indian, and Iranian revolutions, as political events and occasions for political thought. Also under consideration will be contemporary revolutionary movements like #Occupy, the Arab Spring, Black Lives Matter, and prison abolition; and revolutions in political theories of gender, race, and (dis)ability.

POLI 294-02

Revolution and Counterrevolution in Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 294-03*This course traces the revolutionary tradition in modern Latin America, beginning with the Mexican Revolution and focusing in particular on the Cuban Revolution and the guerrilla movements it inspired. The 1979 Sandinista Revolution in Nicaragua will be a particular focus. The course treats counterrevolutionary responses, from state terror to paramilitaries and rondas campesinas to postrevolutionary uprisings (the Cristeros, the Contra), as an inseparable aspect of revolutionary politics. Students will encounter and analyze a diverse range of course materials: political science theory, historiography, combatant memoirs, and film.

POLI 300-01

American Government Institutions

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Michael Zis

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required* Many worry that the America’s political system is in a state of crisis. Is America’s democracy in peril? How does this moment compare to other moments in America’s political history when American democracy was also said to be in crisis? If this crisis is unique, what is the source? Is it ideological polarization, incompetence, authoritarianism, or something else? Is America’s unique system of checks and balances ill-suited to the complexities of modern governance? Is the election of President Trump a symptom of the problem, a cause, both, or neither? These are some of the questions we will be exploring in this seminar. Students will also work toward writing a final research paper related to the topic of study and present it to the class at seminar’s end. In the course of study, students will gain a deeper, historically informed understanding of American political institutional development, the complexity of public policy decision making, and the motivations and resources of various governmental actors.

POLI 316-01

Information Policy, Politics and Law

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required*

Over the past century the world has witnessed incredible changes in the ways that information is produced, distributed, and consumed. Through tutorials, seminar discussions, and individual projects, this course explores the policy problems and conflicts at the cutting edge of the global Information Society. Topics include secrecy, transparency, access to information, surveillance, privacy, intellectual property (such as copyrights and piracy), freedom of expression in a digital world, and the regulation of technology. Offered alternate years. (4 credits)

POLI 321-01

International Security

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes: *Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required*

This is a course designed to introduce students to global or world security studies as an academic field. It begins with a discussion of the various theoretical approaches to the study of international security (including traditional, critical and subaltern approaches). It then proceeds to explore a number of issues that are currently of interest to specialists in the field. While not an exhaustive survey, this course provides a solid introduction to the contemporary study of international security. (4 credits)

POLI 333-01

Power and Development in Africa

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 301-01; sophomore standing or permission of instructor required*

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem

(e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Cross-listed with International Studies 301. (4 credits)

POLI 400-01

Senior Research Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: The research seminar is designed to fulfill partially the capstone experience requirement for political science majors. It is expected that students will have taken the required foundations, methods and intermediate courses prior to beginning the seminar. The goal of the Senior Research Seminar is to launch students on a culminating academic experience organized around the supervised independent study of a political science topic of particular interest and relevance to them. The Seminar is premised on the assumption that students will have a working familiarity with the foundational knowledge in the sub-field(s) relevant to their research project, a mastery of the practical skills introduced in the foundations courses and further developed in the intermediate courses, and a willingness to engage actively in a rigorous, sustained inquiry into an important topic. It is also premised on the assumption that students will take responsibility for managing their own self-directed learning processes. The Senior Research Seminar will normally involve one or more faculty members "coaching" students through the process of defining a significant and important political science research question, developing a thesis, designing an appropriate research program, and writing a substantial portion of a draft Honors thesis or senior independent project. Following successful completion of the Seminar, students participating in the Honors Program are required to enroll in political science independent project. Students not participating in the Honors Program who nevertheless wish to continue with their research should enroll in Political Science 614 (Senior Independent Project). (4 credits)

POLI 400-02

Senior Research Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: The research seminar is designed to fulfill partially the capstone experience requirement for political science majors. It is expected that students will have taken the required foundations, methods and intermediate courses prior to beginning the seminar. The goal of the Senior Research Seminar is to launch students on a culminating academic experience organized around the supervised independent study of a political science topic of particular interest and relevance to them. The Seminar is premised on the assumption that students will have a working familiarity with the foundational knowledge in the sub-field(s) relevant to their research project, a mastery of the practical skills introduced in the foundations courses and further developed in the intermediate courses, and a willingness to engage actively in a rigorous, sustained inquiry into an important topic. It is also premised on the assumption that students will take responsibility for managing their own self-directed learning processes. The Senior Research Seminar will normally involve one or more faculty members "coaching" students through the process of defining a significant and important political science research question, developing a thesis, designing an appropriate research program, and writing a substantial portion of a draft Honors thesis or senior independent project. Following successful completion of the Seminar, students participating in the Honors Program are required to enroll in political science independent project. Students not participating in the Honors Program who nevertheless wish to continue with their research should enroll in Political Science 614 (Senior Independent Project). (4 credits)

POLI 400-03

Senior Research Seminar

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Julie Dolan

Notes: The research seminar is designed to fulfill partially the capstone experience requirement for political science majors. It is expected that students will have taken the required foundations, methods and intermediate courses prior to beginning the seminar. The goal of the Senior Research Seminar is to launch students on a culminating academic experience organized around the supervised independent study of a political science topic of particular interest and relevance to them. The Seminar is premised on the assumption that students will have a working familiarity with the foundational knowledge in the sub-field(s) relevant to their research project, a mastery of the practical skills introduced in the foundations courses and further developed in the intermediate courses, and a willingness to engage actively in a rigorous, sustained inquiry into an important topic. It is also premised on the assumption that students will take responsibility for managing their own self-directed learning processes. The Senior Research Seminar will normally involve one or more faculty members "coaching" students through the process of defining a significant and important political science research question, developing a thesis, designing an appropriate research program, and writing a substantial portion of a draft Honors thesis or senior independent project. Following successful completion of the Seminar, students participating in the Honors Program are required to enroll in political science independent project. Students not participating in the Honors Program who nevertheless wish to continue with their research should enroll in Political Science 614 (Senior Independent Project). (4 credits)

POLI 404-01

Honors Colloquium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: *2 credit course*

A workshop for students pursing honors projects in the political science department. S/N grading only. (2 credits)


Spring 2018

POLI 100-01

Foundations of US Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Michael Zis

Notes: An analysis of the major ideas, actors, institutions, and processes that shape the formulation and execution of public policy in the United States. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 120-01

Foundations of International Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: This course has three broad goals. The first is to develop the foundational knowledge and conceptual literacy necessary to engage with International Relations' multidimensional concerns. These include issues such as world order, power, hierarchy, political violence, international law, development, religion, human rights, gender, humanitarianism and international organizations (such as the United Nations). The second is to introduce students to the different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of international relations (also known as global or world politics), including realist, liberal, constructivist, historical materialist, postcolonial and feminist approaches. The third is to encourage students to reflect on some of the ethical issues inherent in both the study and practice of international politics. Emphasis will also be placed on developing a range of critical, analytical, research and writing skills required for the further study of international politics. The course is thus intended to prepare students for advanced work in the field, although it is also appropriate for those merely seeking to satisfy an interest in the study of global politics. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 140-01

Foundations of Comparative Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: In Comparative Politics we use comparison to analyze political outcomes within and across countries, Why do Mexican presidents exercise strong centralized authority while Brazilian presidents must contend with powerful governors? Why do Muslims and Hindus fight in some Indian states but not in others? Why does Rwanda have such a high proportion of female legislators whereas the U.S. has such a low proportion? When confronted with large-scale protests in their cities, do state security forces in China, Russia, and the United States respond with similar methods or do they differ? Through comparative analysis, students will learn to describe diverse political institutions, to propose explanations for divergent outcomes, and to evaluate scholarly and popular arguments about politics. (4 credits)

POLI 140-02

Foundations of Comparative Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: In Comparative Politics we use comparison to analyze political outcomes within and across countries, Why do Mexican presidents exercise strong centralized authority while Brazilian presidents must contend with powerful governors? Why do Muslims and Hindus fight in some Indian states but not in others? Why does Rwanda have such a high proportion of female legislators whereas the U.S. has such a low proportion? When confronted with large-scale protests in their cities, do state security forces in China, Russia, and the United States respond with similar methods or do they differ? Through comparative analysis, students will learn to describe diverse political institutions, to propose explanations for divergent outcomes, and to evaluate scholarly and popular arguments about politics. (4 credits)

POLI 160-01

Foundations of Political Theory

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Althea Sircar

Notes: An examination of the evolution of influential political concepts and theories from ancient cultures to the present day, by those writing in/from/to the West. Introduction through textual analysis to historical and contemporary understandings of key terms such as authority, legitimacy, liberty, republicanism, democracy, revolution and “the good.” Additionally, the course provides an introduction to political theory methods of analysis and critique, through the development of skills in reading, critical thinking, and writing. (4 credits)

Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.


POLI 207-01

US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: An examination of civil liberties and rights in the U.S., focusing on the cases decided by the Supreme Court. Central topics include the 1st Amendment freedom of religion, speech, and the press; the right to privacy and abortion; and the constitutional requirement of Equal Protection as affecting discrimination, affirmative action, and voting rights. (4 credits)

POLI 215-01

Environmental Politics/Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Roopali Phadke

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of instructor*

This course provides an introduction to the field of Environmental Politics and Policy. Using a comparative approach, the course engages the meaning and development of environmental governance. We will explore the tandem rise of the modern environmental movement and profound new environmental legislation in the U.S. and internationally. Topics investigated will include: deforestation, hazardous wastes, climate change, population growth, and loss of biodiversity. Fall semester. (4 credits)

POLI 216-01

Legislative Politics

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Julie Dolan

Notes: This course explores legislative politics through a combination of academic theory and focused field experiences. Each student must simultaneously enroll in a credit-bearing internship at the Minnesota State Legislature. The class examines the basic structures, players and forces that shape legislative decision-making, the motivation or individual legislators, and their interactions with other political actors and institutions. This course is not available to First Year students. (4 credits)

POLI 222-01

Regional Conflict/Security

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes: This course is intended to introduce students to the military, political, economic, cultural and/or diplomatic dimensions of various regional conflicts or "security complexes." The specific region to be covered will vary from year to year, but it is expected that regions of pressing interest or greater significance to international peace and security will be covered most regularly. This course is designed for political science majors, but is also suitable for others who need to fulfill a distribution requirement in the social sciences or who simply want to satisfy an interest in a specific regional conflict or international politics/security more generally. Political Science 120 recommended. (4 credits)


POLI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 245. (4 credits)


POLI 262-01

American Political Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Michael Zis

Notes: A study of selected writings and topics in political thought of the United States. Political Science 100 recommended. (4 credits)

POLI 269-01

Empirical Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: Strategies and tactics of design, observation, description, and measurement in contemporary political research. (4 credits) Empirical Methods: The department requires its majors to take one course in empirical research methodology, preferably before their junior year. There are a number of courses that fulfill this requirement, including: Political Science 269 (Empirical Research Methods), Political Science 272 (Researching Political Communication), Sociology 269 (Science and Social Inquiry), Sociology 270 (Interpretive Social Research), Sociology 275 (Comparative-Historical Sociology). In some cases, research methods courses taken in other social science disciplines may be used to fulfill this requirement following approval by the political science department chair.

POLI 277-01

Metaphysics in Secular Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Kiarina Kordela

Notes: *Cross-listed with GERM 277-01 and RELI 277-01*

A widespread tendency in contemporary Western societies is to associate metaphysics with religion, if not with what is often dismissively called the "irrational." This course will dismantle this myth by reading closely European philosophy and political theory, mostly since the seventeenth century, in their relation to theology and their reception by twentieth-century critical theory. This will allow us to examine the ways in which secular thought emerges not as an alternative to metaphysics—something which thought cannot supersede anyway—but rather as a different way of dealing with the very same metaphysical questions and issues that concern religion, from the meaning of life to the imminence of death, and from (actual or imagined) guilt to the hope for redemption. We shall endeavor to identify the similarities and differences between the 'secular' and the ‘religious’ ways, including their respective relations to rationality. Readings will include: Aristotle, Talal Asad, George Bataille, Walter Benjamin, Kenneth Burke, Richard Dienst, Emile Durkheim, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Peter Harrison, Jacques Lacan, Karl Marx, Marcel Mauss, Carl Schmitt, Baruch Spinoza, Alberto Toscano, Max Weber, Slavoj Zizek.

All readings in English. No pre-knowledge required. Cross-listed with German Studies 277 and Religious Studies 277. 4 credits

POLI 294-01

Politics of the First World War

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes:

POLI 294-02

Education Politics and Policy

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: *First day attendance required*


POLI 294-03

Women, Gender and World Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes:

POLI 294-04

POLI Topics Course

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Andrew Latham

Notes:

POLI 294-05

Civil Wars and Their Aftermath

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Mosinger

Notes:

POLI 320-01

Global Political Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: David Blaney

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 320-01*

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc. Political Science 120 recommended. Cross-listed with International Studies 320. (4 credits)


POLI 323-01

Humanitarianism in World Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: The past two decades appear to have been very successful ones for humanitarianism. Funding for humanitarianism has skyrocketed; humanitarian organizations have expanded their public support, as well as their activities; and, increasingly, humanitarian issues have found a place at the center of policy decisions. It is also generally agreed that humanitarianism is in crisis owing to the growing awareness of the sometimes harmful effects of aid; the expansion of the concept of humanitarianism to include human rights, development, and peace-building; and the increasing involvement of states in humanitarian operations. This advanced-level course explores the nature and dilemmas of contemporary humanitarianism. (4 credits)

POLI 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with International Studies 352. (4 credits)

POLI 390-01

Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: In his 40-year career at Macalester, Professor Chuck Green functioned as a one-man `leadership academy,¿ inspiring and guiding students to make the transition from detached observers to engaged citizens. Through his teaching, mentoring, and example, Professor Green instilled in students a sense of confidence and optimism about their ability to engage proactively in the world. The Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship honors this legacy. Students with sophomore or junior standing may apply for this seven-month fellowship that includes a spring seminar and a full-time, fully-funded summer field experience. Chuck Green Fellows will study democratic engagement in social and organizational change, identify a client organization working for the public good with whom the student can analyze and address a problem, and then work with that client on a mutually agreed-upon solution. The Fellowship culminates in the early fall with an event in which Fellows, faculty, and clients have an opportunity to reflect on the fellowship experience. The Fellowship fulfills both the practicum and advanced course requirements of the political science major. Contact the political science department for a full description and application. (4 credits)

POLI 394-01

Art of the Possible-4th Branch

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Julie Dolan

Notes:

POLI 394-02

Postcolonial Political and Social Thought

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Althea Sircar

Notes:

POLI 404-01

Honors Colloquium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: *2 credit course*

A workshop for students pursing honors projects in the political science department. S/N grading only. (2 credits)