Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Fall 2017

BIOL 255-01

Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 285
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An intensive exploration of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, chemistry, and function with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and experimental design. Using the same tools used to advance our understanding of modern cell biology and genetics, this lab requires students to become familiar with a mixture of biochemical, cytological, and genetic techniques as they develop testable hypothesis related to topics such as enzyme function, inheritance patterns, genome structure and gene expression, and cell-to-cell signaling. 2 credits.

BIOL 255-02

Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 285
  • Instructor: Randy Daughters

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An intensive exploration of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, chemistry, and function with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and experimental design. Using the same tools used to advance our understanding of modern cell biology and genetics, this lab requires students to become familiar with a mixture of biochemical, cytological, and genetic techniques as they develop testable hypothesis related to topics such as enzyme function, inheritance patterns, genome structure and gene expression, and cell-to-cell signaling. 2 credits.

BIOL 255-03

Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 285
  • Instructor: Randy Daughters

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An intensive exploration of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, chemistry, and function with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and experimental design. Using the same tools used to advance our understanding of modern cell biology and genetics, this lab requires students to become familiar with a mixture of biochemical, cytological, and genetic techniques as they develop testable hypothesis related to topics such as enzyme function, inheritance patterns, genome structure and gene expression, and cell-to-cell signaling. 2 credits.

BIOL 260-01

Genetics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Mary Montgomery

Notes: *First day attendance required*

An introduction to the principles of genetics, including topics from classical Mendalian concepts to the contemporary molecular biology of the gene. Three lecture hours per week.

BIOL 260-02

Genetics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Randy Daughters

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the principles of genetics, including topics from classical Mendalian concepts to the contemporary molecular biology of the gene. Three lecture hours per week.

BIOL 265-01

Cell Biology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Devavani Chatterjea

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the molecular and cellular processes of living organisms. Special attention is paid to problems faced by living cells in the acquisition of energy, growth and repair, reproduction and communication with other cells. Recent advances in biotechnology are also discussed. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or 115. (4 credits)

BIOL 270-01

Biodiversity and Evolution

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Kristina Curry Rogers

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required; must register for BIOL 270-L1* From so simple a beginning, endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved. So concluded Charles Darwin in The Origin of the Species. His final words are an apt description of this course, which focuses on the diversity of life on Earth and the evolutionary processes that influence this variety. We will track the evolution of life, from the first single-celled organisms to the varied flora and fauna of the modern world. We will draw upon recent findings from fields as diverse as molecular genetics, developmental biology, and paleontology to decipher the long and spectacular history of life on earth.

The laboratory component of this course includes hands-on interaction with data, from our own microbiomes, to the fossil record, to living organisms. The class includes local field trips that highlight ancient and modern biodiversity. Students in this course should be ready to explore the evolution of life on earth, and can expect to participate in class discussions, and work together on a larger project that will include a written report (with revisions) and an oral presentation. This course is residential, is one of four required core courses for students majoring in biology, and is a WA course.

Class meets MWF, 10:50 am - 11:50 am in Olin Rice 270. Lab meets T, 1:20-4:30 pm in Olin Rice 273.

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


BIOL 270-02

Biodiversity and Evolution

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Kristina Curry Rogers

Notes: *First day attendance required; must register in BIOL 270-L2; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the diversity and history of life. This course surveys the major groups of organisms (their morphology, physiology, reproductive cycles) and their evolutionary origins and relationships. Using recent findings from such diverse fields as molecular phylogenetics, developmental biology, and paleontology, this course introduces students to the major branches on the tree of life. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week. (4 credits)


BIOL 270-L1

Biodiversity and Evolution Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 273
  • Instructor: Kristina Curry Rogers

Notes: *First Year Lab only; attendance at first lab meeting required*

An introduction to the diversity and history of life. This course surveys the major groups of organisms (their morphology, physiology, reproductive cycles) and their evolutionary origins and relationships. Using recent findings from such diverse fields as molecular phylogenetics, developmental biology, and paleontology, this course introduces students to the major branches on the tree of life. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week. (4 credits)


BIOL 270-L2

Biodiversity and Evolution Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 273
  • Instructor: Michael Anderson

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the diversity and history of life. This course surveys the major groups of organisms (their morphology, physiology, reproductive cycles) and their evolutionary origins and relationships. Using recent findings from such diverse fields as molecular phylogenetics, developmental biology, and paleontology, this course introduces students to the major branches on the tree of life. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week. (4 credits)


BIOL 351-01

Biochemistry I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01; first day attendance required*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, elements of physical biochemistry, the structure of proteins, the mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and selected topics in intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. (4 credits)


BIOL 351-L1

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required*


BIOL 351-L2

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required*


BIOL 357-01

Immunology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Kristin Renkema

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course is an introduction to vertebrate immunity. Its evolution, cellular and molecular mechanisms, health and disease functions and therapeutic manipulations are explored through approaches including lectures, clinical case studies, extensive reading of the primary literature, problem-solving and an intensive focus on scientific writing. The course typically includes a civic engagement component where students work with health organizations and schools in the Twin Cities area. The course laboratory uses guided exercises and independent projects to focus on current immunological techniques including flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting and antibody assays. Three hours of lectures and four to six hours of laboratory per week. Junior or senior standing required. (4 credits).

BIOL 357-L1

Immunology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 277
  • Instructor: Kristin Renkema

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course is an introduction to vertebrate immunity. Its evolution, cellular and molecular mechanisms, health and disease functions and therapeutic manipulations are explored through approaches including lectures, clinical case studies, extensive reading of the primary literature, problem-solving and an intensive focus on scientific writing. The course typically includes a civic engagement component where students work with health organizations and schools in the Twin Cities area. The course laboratory uses guided exercises and independent projects to focus on current immunological techniques including flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting and antibody assays. Three hours of lectures and four to six hours of laboratory per week. Junior or senior standing required. (4 credits).

BIOL 358-01

Microbiology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course is an introduction to the subdisciplines of microbiology: virology, bacteriology, immunology, parasitology and mycology. Emphasis is given to our efforts to understand and control microbial growth processes. Additional focus will be on the effect of microbes on humans, especially as relates to disease processes. The laboratory emphasizes determinative microbiology. Three hours of lecture/discussion and four to five hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

BIOL 358-L1

Microbiology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course is an introduction to the subdisciplines of microbiology: virology, bacteriology, immunology, parasitology and mycology. Emphasis is given to our efforts to understand and control microbial growth processes. Additional focus will be on the effect of microbes on humans, especially as relates to disease processes. The laboratory emphasizes determinative microbiology. Three hours of lecture/discussion and four to five hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-01

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Keith Kuwata

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-02

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Paul Fischer

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-03

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-04

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L1

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L2

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 341
  • Instructor: Susan Green

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L3

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L4

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 341
  • Instructor: Susan Green

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L5

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L6

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 341
  • Instructor: Marc Rodwogin

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L7

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L8

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 341
  • Instructor: Susan Green

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 111-L9

General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*

This course offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 115-01

Accelerated General Chemistry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: *Reserved for First Year Students; $12 lab fee required*

This course combines topics from both Chemistry 111 and 112 and is meant to be an accelerated one-semester version of General Chemistry. The course begins with a rigorous treatment of atomic and molecular structure, and explores various modern models of chemical bonding. These ideas are applied to a thorough discussion of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Conceptual and mathematical methods for quantifying chemical equilibrium are also explored, with particular emphasis on the chemistry of acids and bases. Some knowledge of calculus is recommended. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 115-L1

Accel General Chemistry Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 380
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: *Reserved for First Year students only; $12 lab fee required*

This course combines topics from both Chemistry 111 and 112 and is meant to be an accelerated one-semester version of General Chemistry. The course begins with a rigorous treatment of atomic and molecular structure, and explores various modern models of chemical bonding. These ideas are applied to a thorough discussion of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Conceptual and mathematical methods for quantifying chemical equilibrium are also explored, with particular emphasis on the chemistry of acids and bases. Some knowledge of calculus is recommended. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $12 required. (4 credits)

CHEM 211-01

Organic Chemistry I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 211-02

Organic Chemistry I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 211-L1

Organic Chemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 211-L2

Organic Chemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 211-L3

Organic Chemistry I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 211-L4

Organic Chemistry I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 211-L5

Organic Chemistry I Lab

  • Days: F
  • Meeting Time: 01:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Marc Rodwogin

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course develops a broad understanding of the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital theory and valence bond resonance theory are invoked to describe and explain the ramification of covalent bonding in organic molecules, as well as to rationalize fundamental noncovalent associations. Thermodynamic considerations of 3-dimensional molecular shape are discussed. Contemporary instrumental techniques for the assignment of molecular structure are a key focus. Modern mechanistic theory of organic chemical reactions is developed in the context of acid-base, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CHEM 112 with a C- or better OR CHEM 115 with a C- or better.

CHEM 300-01

Chemistry Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *1 credit course*

Presentations on current topics in the molecular sciences by campus visitors, as well as by Macalester students and faculty. Students may be expected to prepare for the presentations by reading, and in some cases, discussing the work of a speaker in advance of his/her seminar presentation. Chemistry majors will make two oral presentations over four semesters. All students will submit a written synopsis for three seminar presentations each semester. One hour per week.

CHEM 311-01

Thermodynamics and Kinetics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course covers topics in macroscopic physical chemistry dealing with the bulk properties of matter and energy. These topics include the properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates of reactions and chemical kinetics, and x-ray diffractometry. Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 311-L1

Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 378
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course covers topics in macroscopic physical chemistry dealing with the bulk properties of matter and energy. These topics include the properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates of reactions and chemical kinetics, and x-ray diffractometry. Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 311-L2

Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 378
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course covers topics in macroscopic physical chemistry dealing with the bulk properties of matter and energy. These topics include the properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates of reactions and chemical kinetics, and x-ray diffractometry. Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 311-L3

Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 378
  • Instructor: Keith Kuwata

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course covers topics in macroscopic physical chemistry dealing with the bulk properties of matter and energy. These topics include the properties of gases, the First and Second Laws of thermodynamics and their application to physical and chemical systems, phase and chemical equilibria, rates of reactions and chemical kinetics, and x-ray diffractometry. Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 351-01

Biochemistry I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01; first day attendance required*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, physical biochemistry, structure of proteins, mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and introduction to intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 351-L1

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, physical biochemistry, structure of proteins, mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and introduction to intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 351-L2

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2;attendance at first lab meeting required*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, physical biochemistry, structure of proteins, mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and introduction to intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 361-01

Advanced Organic Chemistry

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Selected topics in organic chemistry, including stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, modern methods of organic synthesis and spectral methods of identifying organic compounds. Laboratory emphasis on spectral, chromatographic and synthetic methods. (4 credits)


CHEM 411-01

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Paul Fischer

Notes: This course examines how modern theories of chemical bonding are applied to an understanding of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic table. Students explore chemical structures, reactions and spectra on the basis of molecular symmetry and group theory. Topics covered include chemical periodicity, coordination compounds, and organometallic complexes. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 411-L1

Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 347
  • Instructor: Paul Fischer

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course examines how modern theories of chemical bonding are applied to an understanding of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic table. Students explore chemical structures, reactions and spectra on the basis of molecular symmetry and group theory. Topics covered include chemical periodicity, coordination compounds, and organometallic complexes. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

CHEM 411-L2

Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 347
  • Instructor: Paul Fischer

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course examines how modern theories of chemical bonding are applied to an understanding of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic table. Students explore chemical structures, reactions and spectra on the basis of molecular symmetry and group theory. Topics covered include chemical periodicity, coordination compounds, and organometallic complexes. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

MATH 135-01

Applied Multivariable Calculus I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Lori Ziegelmeier

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for applied work in the natural and social sciences. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing and mathematical modeling skills. The topics include functions as models of data, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, integration, differential equations, and estimation techniques. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. Every semester. (4 credits)


MATH 135-02

Applied Multivariable Calculus I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Lori Ziegelmeier

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for applied work in the natural and social sciences. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing and mathematical modeling skills. The topics include functions as models of data, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, integration, differential equations, and estimation techniques. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. Every semester. (4 credits)


MATH 137-01

Applied Multivariable Calculus II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: William Mitchell

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Every semester. (4 credits)

MATH 137-02

Applied Multivariable Calculus II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Joseph Benson

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Every semester. (4 credits)

MATH 137-03

Applied Multivariable Calculus II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: David Ehren

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Every semester. (4 credits)

MATH 155-01

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-02

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-03

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-04

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 237-01

Applied Multivariable Calculus III

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Ian Whitehead

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics.

MATH 237-02

Applied Multivariable Calculus III

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Ian Whitehead

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics.

PHYS 226-01

Principles of Physics I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Sean Bartz

Notes: A study of motion, including Newton's Law of Motion, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, waves in elastic media and thermal properties of matter. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 221 and Physics 226. Fall semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 226-02

Principles of Physics I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Sean Bartz

Notes: A study of motion, including Newton's Law of Motion, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, waves in elastic media and thermal properties of matter. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 221 and Physics 226. Fall semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 226-L1

Principles of Physics I Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-04:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of motion, including Newton's Law of Motion, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, waves in elastic media and thermal properties of matter. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 221 and Physics 226. Fall semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 226-L2

Principles of Physics I Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-09:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of motion, including Newton's Law of Motion, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, waves in elastic media and thermal properties of matter. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 221 and Physics 226. Fall semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 226-L3

Principles of Physics I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:10 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of motion, including Newton's Law of Motion, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, waves in elastic media and thermal properties of matter. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 221 and Physics 226. Fall semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 226-L4

Principles of Physics I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of motion, including Newton's Law of Motion, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, waves in elastic media and thermal properties of matter. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 221 and Physics 226. Fall semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 227-01

Principles of Physics II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 101
  • Instructor: Tonnis ter Veldhuis

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 222 and Physics 227. Every semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 227-L1

Principles of Physics II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:10 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 222 and Physics 227. Every semester. (4 credits)


PHYS 227-L2

Principles of Physics II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both Physics 222 and Physics 227. Every semester. (4 credits)


Spring 2018

BIOL 255-01

Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 285
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An intensive exploration of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, chemistry, and function with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and experimental design. Using the same tools used to advance our understanding of modern cell biology and genetics, this lab requires students to become familiar with a mixture of biochemical, cytological, and genetic techniques as they develop testable hypothesis related to topics such as enzyme function, inheritance patterns, genome structure and gene expression, and cell-to-cell signaling. Corequisite(s): BIOL 260 - Genetics or BIOL 265 - Cell Biology.

BIOL 255-02

Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 285
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An intensive exploration of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, chemistry, and function with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and experimental design. Using the same tools used to advance our understanding of modern cell biology and genetics, this lab requires students to become familiar with a mixture of biochemical, cytological, and genetic techniques as they develop testable hypothesis related to topics such as enzyme function, inheritance patterns, genome structure and gene expression, and cell-to-cell signaling. Corequisite(s): BIOL 260 - Genetics or BIOL 265 - Cell Biology.

BIOL 255-03

Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 285
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An intensive exploration of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, chemistry, and function with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and experimental design. Using the same tools used to advance our understanding of modern cell biology and genetics, this lab requires students to become familiar with a mixture of biochemical, cytological, and genetic techniques as they develop testable hypothesis related to topics such as enzyme function, inheritance patterns, genome structure and gene expression, and cell-to-cell signaling. Corequisite(s): BIOL 260 - Genetics or BIOL 265 - Cell Biology.

BIOL 260-01

Genetics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Randy Daughters

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the principles of genetics, including topics from classical Mendalian concepts to the contemporary molecular biology of the gene. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 111, CHEM 112,or CHEM 115.

BIOL 260-03

Genetics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Paul Overvoorde

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the principles of genetics, including topics from classical Mendalian concepts to the contemporary molecular biology of the gene. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 111, CHEM 112,or CHEM 115.

BIOL 265-01

Cell Biology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Lin Aanonsen

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the molecular and cellular processes of living organisms. Special attention is paid to problems faced by living cells in the acquisition of energy, growth and repair, reproduction and communication with other cells. Recent advances in biotechnology are also discussed.Three lecture hours. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or CHEM 115.

BIOL 270-01

Biodiversity and Evolution

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Sarah Boyer

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the diversity and history of life. This course surveys the major groups of organisms (their morphology, physiology, reproductive cycles) and their evolutionary origins and relationships. Using recent findings from such diverse fields as molecular phylogenetics, developmental biology, and paleontology, this course introduces students to the major branches on the tree of life. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week.

BIOL 270-L1

Biodiversity and Evolution Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 273
  • Instructor: Michael Anderson

Notes: *First day lab attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the diversity and history of life. This course surveys the major groups of organisms (their morphology, physiology, reproductive cycles) and their evolutionary origins and relationships. Using recent findings from such diverse fields as molecular phylogenetics, developmental biology, and paleontology, this course introduces students to the major branches on the tree of life. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week.

BIOL 270-L2

Biodiversity and Evolution Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 273
  • Instructor: Michael Anderson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the diversity and history of life. This course surveys the major groups of organisms (their morphology, physiology, reproductive cycles) and their evolutionary origins and relationships. Using recent findings from such diverse fields as molecular phylogenetics, developmental biology, and paleontology, this course introduces students to the major branches on the tree of life. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week.

BIOL 351-01

Biochemistry I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, elements of physical biochemistry, the structure of proteins, the mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and selected topics in intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212 and BIOL 265, or permission of the instructor. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite course(s).

BIOL 351-L1

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, elements of physical biochemistry, the structure of proteins, the mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and selected topics in intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212 and BIOL 265, or permission of the instructor. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite course(s).

BIOL 351-L2

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, elements of physical biochemistry, the structure of proteins, the mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and selected topics in intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212 and BIOL 265, or permission of the instructor. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite course(s).

BIOL 353-01

Advanced Genetics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Mary Montgomery

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An in-depth study of the principle of modern genetics, this course will examine topics which range from Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance patterns to the concepts and practices of molecular biology. Among other topics, there will be discussions on human genetics, the human genome project, and the application of genetic principles in genetic counseling. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 255, BIOL 260  and BIOL 265

BIOL 355-01

Virology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

This seminar course will focus on the molecular biology of viruses, including prions and retroviral vectors. Topics will include bacterial, plant and animal viral infection and replication cycles, morphology, oncogenesis, and virus-host interactions. Viruses of epidemiologic and biotechnological importance, including new and emergent viruses, will be emphasized. Students will read current literature, lead class discussions and prepare a research proposal. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 255, BIOL 260, BIOL 265 and junior or senior standing.

BIOL 356-01

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Randy Daughters

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

A study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the biological basis of behavior. While particular emphasis is placed on the molecular and cellular components of the nervous system, these components are the foundation for the analysis of various systems. Discussion topics may include the role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and receptors in learning and memory, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and drug addiction. The laboratory will be used to introduce major research techniques in neurobiology. These techniques will be used in independently designed research projects. Three lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 255, BIOL 260, and BIOL 265

BIOL 356-L1

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 277
  • Instructor: Randy Daughters

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

A study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the biological basis of behavior. While particular emphasis is placed on the molecular and cellular components of the nervous system, these components are the foundation for the analysis of various systems. Discussion topics may include the role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and receptors in learning and memory, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and drug addiction. The laboratory will be used to introduce major research techniques in neurobiology. These techniques will be used in independently designed research projects. Three lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 255, BIOL 260, and BIOL 265

BIOL 489-01

Biology Seminar

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Boyer, Chatterjea

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

A weekly class consisting of a variety of activities, including career guidance and invited presentations by professionals who speak on a wide range of biologically related topics.  As part of the seminar, students complete their Senior Presentation, a multiple-draft paper written over the course of the semester accompanied by a 15 minute seminar on the paper's topic.  Satisfactory completion of the Senior Presentation is a required to receive credit for the Senior Seminar, which all majors must complete to graduate with a Biology major. Offered on S/NC grading only. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

CHEM 112-01

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Paul Fischer

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-02

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Paul Fischer

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-03

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-04

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Susan Green

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L1

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:11 am
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L2

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 347
  • Instructor: Keith Kuwata

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L3

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L4

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L5

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L6

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 347
  • Instructor: Marc Rodwogin

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 112-L7

General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 01:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 343
  • Instructor: Amy Rice

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*

This course provides an intuitive, yet rigorous, understanding of how energy is stored and transferred in chemical systems. We start with the behavior of individual atoms and molecules (using the foundation of atomic and molecular structure laid in CHEM 111 , and then build up to the macroscopic concepts of thermodynamics. We focus on free energy as a powerful tool for predicting physical and chemical behavior. We then apply our understanding of energetics to electrochemical systems and the rates of chemical reactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Lab fee of $7 required. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111 with a grade of C- or better, or satisfactory performance on a placement examination.

CHEM 212-01

Organic Chemistry II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 212-02

Organic Chemistry II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 212-L1

Organic Chemistry II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 212-L2

Organic Chemistry II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Ronald Brisbois

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 212-L3

Organic Chemistry II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Susan Green

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 212-L4

Organic Chemistry II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 212-L5

Organic Chemistry II Lab

  • Days: F
  • Meeting Time: 01:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 383
  • Instructor: Marc Rodwogin

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course further develops the theoretical concepts of organic chemistry, and helps students to develop an ability to propose plausible synthetic pathways to organic molecules. Particular focus is on nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, free radical, and pericyclic reactions. Three lectures, four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 222-01

Analytical Chemistry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Keith Kuwata

Notes: This course uses key concepts of chemical equilibrium and structure to solve problems in chemical analysis. Lecture and laboratory work provide both the theoretical foundations and practical training in classical methods (gravimetric and volumetric analysis), atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and chromatography. Statistics and error analysis are also emphasized throughout the course. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 with a grade of C- or better or CHEM 115 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 222-L1

Analytical Chemistry Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Keith Kuwata

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course uses key concepts of chemical equilibrium and structure to solve problems in chemical analysis. Lecture and laboratory work provide both the theoretical foundations and practical training in classical methods (gravimetric and volumetric analysis), atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and chromatography. Statistics and error analysis are also emphasized throughout the course. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 with a grade of C- or better or CHEM 115 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 222-L2

Analytical Chemistry Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Keith Kuwata

Notes: *Attendance at first lab meeting required*

This course uses key concepts of chemical equilibrium and structure to solve problems in chemical analysis. Lecture and laboratory work provide both the theoretical foundations and practical training in classical methods (gravimetric and volumetric analysis), atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and chromatography. Statistics and error analysis are also emphasized throughout the course. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 with a grade of C- or better or CHEM 115 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 300-01

Chemistry Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 350
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *1 credit course*

Presentations on current topics in the molecular sciences by campus visitors, as well as by Macalester students and faculty. Students may be expected to prepare for the presentations by reading, and in some cases, discussing the work of a speaker in advance of his/her seminar presentation. Chemistry majors will make two oral presentations over four semesters. All students will submit a written synopsis for three seminar presentations each semester. One hour per week. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing

CHEM 312-01

Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: This course covers topics in microscopic physical chemistry dealing with the structural and energetic properties of individual molecules. These topics include the foundations and applications of quantum mechanics, electronic structure and bonding, computational chemistry, molecular symmetry, group theory, rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or CHEM 115, PHYS 227, and MATH 237. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite courses.

CHEM 312-L1

Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Thomas Varberg

Notes: This course covers topics in microscopic physical chemistry dealing with the structural and energetic properties of individual molecules. These topics include the foundations and applications of quantum mechanics, electronic structure and bonding, computational chemistry, molecular symmetry, group theory, rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or CHEM 115, PHYS 227, and MATH 237. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite courses.

CHEM 351-01

Biochemistry I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, physical biochemistry, structure of proteins, mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and introduction to intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212 and BIOL 265 or permission of instructor. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite courses.

CHEM 351-L1

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, physical biochemistry, structure of proteins, mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and introduction to intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212 and BIOL 265 or permission of instructor. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite courses.

CHEM 351-L2

Biochemistry I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Leah Witus

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2*

A study of biological processes at the molecular level with an emphasis on the chemistry of biological molecules, physical biochemistry, structure of proteins, mechanisms and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, and introduction to intermediary metabolism, including the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 212 and BIOL 265 or permission of instructor. Student must earn a grade of C- or higher in prerequisite courses.

CHEM 394-01

Research in Biochemistry

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; must co-register for CHEM 394-L1* In this course students will pursue an independent research project in the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Broadly speaking, bioinorganic chemistry comprises the study of metal ions in biological processes and medicine. There are three main objectives for this course: 1.) become proficient in several biochemical preparation and analytical techniques 2.) learn about the bioinorganic chemistry field via the primary literature. 3.) develop an appreciation for the nature of scientific research.

CHEM 394-02

Research in Organic Chemistry

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; must co-register in CHEM 394-L2* The primary purpose of this course is to expose students to life as an organic chemist. Students will (1) practice advanced organic chemistry techniques, (2) analyze data obtained by operating state-of-the-art instrumentation, and (3) develop scientific writing and oral presentation skills. These learning goals will be achieved by student involvement in an active research project being pursued by faculty in the Chemistry Department. The course consists of one class meeting and two laboratory sessions each week.

CHEM 394-L1

Research in Biochemistry Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 364
  • Instructor: Kathryn Splan

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; must co-register for CHEM 394-01*

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CHEM 394-L2

Research Organic Chem Lab

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 360
  • Instructor: Dennis Cao

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; must co-register in CHEM 394-02*

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

MATH 135-01

Applied Multivariable Calculus I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Kristin Heysse

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limits reflects saving eight seats for first years students*

This course focuses on calculus useful for applied work in the natural and social sciences. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing and mathematical modeling skills. The topics include functions as models of data, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, integration, differential equations, and estimation techniques. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. Prerequisite(s): None.

MATH 135-02

Applied Multivariable Calculus I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: David Ehren

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving 8 seats for first year students.*

This course focuses on calculus useful for applied work in the natural and social sciences. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing and mathematical modeling skills. The topics include functions as models of data, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, integration, differential equations, and estimation techniques. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. Prerequisite(s): None.

MATH 137-01

Applied Multivariable Calculus II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: William Mitchell

Notes: *Limit reflects saving eight seats for first year students*

This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Prerequisite(s): MATH 135 or a year of high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with an AB score of 4 or higher.

MATH 137-02

Applied Multivariable Calculus II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: William Mitchell

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving eight seats for first year students.*

This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Prerequisite(s): MATH 135 or a year of high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with an AB score of 4 or higher.

MATH 137-03

Applied Multivariable Calculus II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Joseph Benson

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving eight seats for first year students*

This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Prerequisite(s): MATH 135 or a year of high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with an AB score of 4 or higher.

MATH 155-01

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 155-02

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 254
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 155-03

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 155-04

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Lisa Lendway

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving six seats for first year students*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression.

MATH 237-01

Applied Multivariable Calculus III

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Joseph Benson

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor; limit reflects saving eight seats for first year students*

This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. Prerequisite(s): MATH 137 or a strong high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with a BC score of 4 or higher.

MATH 237-02

Applied Multivariable Calculus III

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Joseph Benson

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 1st with permission of instructor;limit reflects saving eight seats for first year students*

This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. Prerequisite(s): MATH 137 or a strong high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with a BC score of 4 or higher.

PHYS 227-01

Principles of Physics II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Sean Bartz

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PHYS 222. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 226 and MATH 137 (MATH 137 may also be taken concurrently).

PHYS 227-L1

Principles of Physics II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:10 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PHYS 222. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 226 and MATH 137 (MATH 137 may also be taken concurrently).

PHYS 227-L2

Principles of Physics II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PHYS 222. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 226 and MATH 137 (MATH 137 may also be taken concurrently).

PHYS 227-L3

Principles of Physics II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:10 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 152
  • Instructor: Brian Adams

Notes: A study of electric charge and currents, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PHYS 222. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 226 and MATH 137 (MATH 137 may also be taken concurrently).